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IUAES 2019 Inter-Congress “World Solidarities”

from to (Europe/Warsaw)
at Poznań, Poland
Support Email: iuaes2019@mazurkas.pl
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  • Tuesday, 27 August 2019
    • 16:00 - 18:00 Opening Ceremony & Keynote Lecture 1
      Location: AMU Rectorate, Wieniawskiego 1, 61-712 Poznań
      Material: Map link
      • 16:00 Opening Ceremony 45'
      • 16:45 Keynote Lecture 1 (The Seductions of Europe and the Solidarities of Eurasia) 30'
        Almost 40 years ago, when I was doing fieldwork in Poland, the word Solidarity was on everyone’s lips. One of the popular rallying cries, here and elsewhere in the region, was that of “rejoining Europe”. Similar ebullience was found in many Western countries at the time, justified by the increasingly progressive politics of the European Economic Community (as it was known at the time) and by the intellectual vogue for “civil society” as a key component of the continent’s liberal Enlightenment heritage.
        
        Today, in Poland and elsewhere in Europe, scepticism toward the idea of solidarity at the level of the EU runs deep. Populist politicians thrive and liberal civil society struggles. Why is this happening? Where else in the contemporary world can solidary solutions to the problems of the planet be forged?
        The answer given in this lecture will be radically Eurosceptic. Without denying the remarkable accomplishments of Europe since classical antiquity, it is necessary to place them in wider contexts. The landmass should be conceived as Eurasia, of which Europe is an important macro-region; it is an equivalent of China, not of Asia. The lecture will touch briefly on Axial Age theory, when social solidarities emerged on an unprecedented scale across the landmass, accompanied by ideas of moral universalism. It will also expound Jack Goody’s thesis concerning “alternating leadership” between East and West since the urban revolution of the Bronze Age. If we follow Goody by abandoning the rhetoric of a “European miracle” and look instead to Eurasian commonalities over the last three millennia, we shall be in a better position to create the geopolitical and moral solidarities urgently needed by humanity.
        Speaker: Chris Hann (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
      • 17:15 Music Welcome by DagaDana 45'
    • 18:00 - 19:30 Welcome Reception
      Location: AMU Rectorate, Wieniawskiego 1, 61-712 Poznań
      Material: Map link
  • Wednesday, 28 August 2019
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Plenary Session 1: 28 Aug
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71; 1.43; 1.44
      • 09:00 Plenary Session 1 (Anthropological Solidarities: Lines of Division and Collaboration within Academia [Young Scholars’ Plenary]) 1h30'
        We have learned and we teach that people and cultures are no self-contained units, but rather “encounter-based collaborations” (Tsing 2015). But how does it really affect our fieldwork and writing? And how does it affect our lives and work as anthropologists? Since the beginning of anthropology there have been many power hierarchies ingrained in the discipline, which relate to gender, race, ethnicity and age politics, as well as to geographical locations and issues of access (to databases and libraries, to language and editing, to field sites and conferences etc.). These divisions in many ways challenge solidarities within anthropology. With this plenary, we want to ask to what extent can we apply the idea of solidarity and collaboration in practice today, when we observe the ever present power inequalities, exacerbated by growing commodification of scholarship and privatization of academic work? How can we deal with divisions embedded in how we teach and practice anthropology? Can our everyday practices undermine the hegemony of individualism and growth? What kinds of solidarities can we demand from ourselves and imagine for the future of the discipline?
        Speakers: Dr. Amurabi Oliveira (Federal University of Santa Catarina) (Federal University of Santa Catarina), Dr. Mariya Ivancheva (University of Liverpool) (University of Liverpool), Dr. Dorota Woroniecka-Krzyżanowska (German Historical Institute Warsaw), Zofia Boni - Convenor (Adam Mickiewicz University) (Adam Mickiewicz University), Małgorzata Kowalska - Convenor (Adam Mickiewicz University) (Adam Mickiewicz University)
    • 10:30 - 11:00 Coffe break
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Beyond the Politics of Disregard: Charting the Affective Histories of Post/Colonialism: P 10.1

      Room 3.19

      This panel proposes a conceptualization of the histories of colonialism and postcolonialism as affective histories, taking affect and emotion as analytical starting points. Emotions are not irrational or solely private phenomena but social processes that can shed light on the socio-structural conditions that produce them.Colonial governance shaped people’s intimate ecologies and was underpinned by a politics of disregard. As Stoler(2009:236) has noted, “disdain, desire, and disaffection for thoughts and things native were basic to the colonial order of things”. Resentment, hate, shame, anger, and fear saturated the lived inequities of colonial relations. Simultaneously, however, these inequities produced transgressive/subversive emotional responses in the form of anger, resilience, courage, and solidarity, which form part of an alternate colonial archive or a politics of “decolonial love” (Sandoval 2000).If disregard and disavowal were integral to the edifice of colonialism, and anger, love and resilience to its dismantling, what are the dispositions and emotions characterizing the so-called ‘postcolonial’ present? We welcome presentations that investigate the silences and omissions at the heart of politics of disregard, which continues to permeate the postcolonial order, whether in policy-making and governance, cultural production and consumption, migration, or tourism encounters.Furthermore, we are interested in examinations of practices and policies that draw on the affective tradition of decolonial love and attempt to go beyond disregard, as a means of combatting coloniality and cultural dominance.We invite papers that chart the troubled emotional landscape of the postcolonial present, without dismissing colonial durabilities or contemporary instances of the neo/colonial present in Europe and beyond.
      Conveners: Dr. Alexandra Oanca (University of Amsterdam), Dr. Daniela Franca Joffe (University of Hull), Dr. Laura Pozzi (University of Warsaw)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.19
      • 11:00 Criminals or Victims?- Indian Denotified Tribes Fettered by British Laws 20'
        The saga of unending problems of Denotified tribes emanates from the British colonial policies that branded certain nomadic and semi- nomadic tribes as ‘born criminals’. The British were fearful of the revengeful tendencies of these inexorable communities, and tried to control them by Criminal Tribal Act (CTA) , 1871, which subjected them to severe administrative measures. They were kept in open jails, were forced to appear daily before police and were interrogated whenever any crime occurred. Such policy of ‘British misadministration’ permanently harmed them and denied them their basic rights. Indian government repealed the CTA 1871 and brought in new Habitual Offenders Act, 1952 to provide some respite to these tribal communities. The notified tribes were denotified and ostensibly some attempts were made to ameliorate their condition. These administrative approach however reflected the British policy of controlling and ostracizing these tribes. Till today they bear the brunt of wearing the tag of ‘born criminals’, are terrorized by the police department and exploited by others. They live as vagabonds and beggars and are often forced to take to activities like prostitution. In spite of various recommendations given by different commissions appointed by government, there is no effective solution to end their quandry. The present study ponders over the dilemmas faced by these denotified tribes of Indian society and difficulties they undergo in their daily lives prejudices. Using a combination of empirical method and doctrinal research, the study aims to critically evaluate the condition of denotified tribes and provide useful suggestions.
        Speaker: Dr. Deepshikha Agarwal (GGSIP University)
      • 11:20 The ‘nègre blanc’ in action: emotional mobilization and political symbols in independence movements in Québec (1963-1975) and Northern Ireland (1969-1997). 20'
        This paper explores two examples of independence movements in the West combatting the collective emotion of “shame of the colonized”, namely the Front de Libération du Québec (FLQ, 1963-1975) and the Irish Republican Army (IRA, 1969-1997). In Québec and in Northern Ireland, the independence struggles were based on and legitimized by a strong focus on their culture and how it was devalued by the British(-Canadian) government. This devaluation evoked a feeling of shame.
          
          The FLQ and the IRA were inspired by the Civil Rights Movement. In order to identify the Québécois and Northern-Irish case with the Civil Rights Movement, the FLQ and IRA created a new national identity around the figure of the so-called 'nègre blanc' or ‘white nigger’. The metaphor worked in three ways. First, it evoked collective shame and legitimized the independence struggles. Secondly, the metaphor made it possible to refer to the Civil Rights Movement as a model for a successful revolution to turn 'nègre blanc' or ‘white nigger’ shame into pride. Thirdly, the metaphor helped to reveal dominant British(-Canadian) practices as shameful.
          
          The use of the metaphor is an example of the ongoing presence of the colonial past in the West, even in the age of decolonization. Anthropologist Ann Stoler stated that colonial histories “yield new damages and renewed disparities.” This paper will explore two examples of these disparities and at the same time open up a new historiographic approach that focuses on the role of emotions in social action during the period of decolonization.
        Speaker: Lisa Koks (University of Amsterdam)
      • 11:40 Hidden desires, haunted dreamscapes. Postwar West Germany’s consumer culture in a postcolonial perspective 20'
        Only few scholars have asked how the dominant consumer ideals of the postwar period in western Europe were entangled with the previous colonialist and fascist politicization of the commercial sphere (Lombardi-Diop 2011). The same holds true for the possible links between the meanings of postwar consumer cultures and the context of decolonization (Ross 1995).
          
          Based on a broad range of material stemming from West German consumer culture during the 1950s, the paper will use a number of examples to analyze the affective economies inscribed in consumer imaginaries that constructed an ideal of cultural homogeneity and superiority as well as fantasies of global conquest, while this dreamscape continued to be built on the exclusion of racial “others”. Such imaginaries thereby imbued consumer objects with a socially and politically redemptive quality which simultaneously addressed both the manifest desire to leave the past behind and to silently (re-)connect to past imperial aspirations. In order to understand the affective economy of this constellation, it is necessary to consider how the supposed break with the Nazi past after 1945 in West Germany coincided with the context of a postwar western Europe that had not yet transitioned from the colonial paradigm to a “postcolonial condition” (Young 2012).
          
          Finally, the paper argues that because this figuration of imaginaries and affects defies the distinction between a (colonial/imperial) “past” and a (postcolonial/post-imperial) “present”, the scholarly process has involved confronting experiences of “haunting” (Bhabha 1992) linked to the relevant encounters in the archive.
        
        Speaker: Dr. Natalie Scholz (University of Amsterdam / Department of History)
      • 12:00 Modern position of the traditional Ngoni leaders (cross-cultural research experience) 20'
        A lot of researchers predicted disappearance of chiefs from the lives of the modern African countries. The chiefs, having been the instruments of colonial administration, integrated into the State apparatus were supposed to be replaced by elected politicians. At present, there is an opportunity to assess the position of the Ngoni traditional leaders due to the sociological survey’s data analysis of Afrobarometer 2005-2015. Apart from the Ngoni respondents as monitoring category, Chewa, Yao, Nyanja, and Tumbuka people, whose languages are currently spoken by the majority of the Ngoni, were also integrated into the survey. First and foremost, in all the communities under consideration, democratic attitudes of the respondent’s majority are being revealed. Nepotism and autocracy were condemned. It is necessary to highlight the care towards the traditional leader’s political neutrality. According to the fact, there is no ethnical specificity in the evaluation of the activities done by the traditional leaders as well as the elected politicians. The direction of the leader’s authority is rather limited: resolving local disputes and land distribution. The Ngoni traditional leaders have credibility of high level, approval of their authority and influence, that according to respondent’s expectations will increase in future. Although, since the colonial authorities have been established, the chiefdom has no longer been playing its former role, but the traditional leaders themselves occupied their own niche in the specific hybrid political system. It is possible to predict that the borders between elected politicians and the Ngoni traditional leaders will gradually vanish.

        [This research has been supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 18-011-00644)].
        Speaker: Elena Valieva (Saint Petersburg State University)
      • 12:20 Emotions on Display: colonial history and visitors’ emotional response in the Shanghai History Museum 20'
        This paper analyses visitors’ emotional response to the Shanghai History Museum’s (SHM) representation of colonial past. Chinese historiography refers to the years between the First Opium War and the establishment of the People’s Republic (roughly 1839-1949) as China’s “century of humiliation” due to the country semi-colonial status. By juxtaposing images of colonial violence and the heroic fight of the local population against the usurpers, the exhibition is designed to rise nationalist feelings among local visitors, but is it always the case? What do visitors think about the SHM’s representation of the city colonial history? Do foreign tourists show a similar understanding of the exhibition? Based on interviews and visitors’ comments, this paper sought to analyse how visitors’ national background influence their understanding of the exhibition and their emotional reaction to it. This paper also attempts to analyse how Chinese museums’ representation of the country past does (or does not) influence Chinese citizens’ emotional response of their country neo-colonial expansion in Asia. Under Mao Zedong, the People’s Republic was one the supporter of the process of decolonization of third world countries, but now it is seen by many as a neo-colonial power. Are the feelings of disdain and anger against Western/Japanese colonial projects promoted by Chinese institutions still valid when looking at China’s own neo-colonial practices? How do Chinese museums tackle these questions?
        Speaker: Dr. Laura Pozzi (University of Warsaw)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Wandering Cultures at the Turn of the 20th and 21st Centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. Experience, Memory, Narration: P 22.1

      Room 3.138

      "Aimless wandering from place to place has had various dimensions conditioned by social-historical context in the 20th and 21st centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. Adopted exceptional forms as exile during wars and revolutions being a result of ethnic and political persecution, war damage, famine. In the period of peace, wandering was also a response to poverty, including people’s need for shelter and work. For the Roma and Sinti, wandering has been associated with their nomadic tradition included in their long history of traversing the world rather than settling it. Wandering has been also a choice of a lifestyle of artists - flaneurs and tourists – seeking, in the ""way without an aim"", experiences, emotions and inspiration for their creativity. Nowadays, when some people still experience wandering as a burden, others decide to pay a high price to be participants of wandering tourism. Apart from people, also animals and objects have been wanderers. The experience of wandering in its various dimensions has been the most important part of memory of Eastern, Central and Southern Europe in the 20th/21st century and work of that memory is still a rich source of wandering narratives. In this context, we propose the following issues of our session: - diversity of experiences, memories and narratives of wandering - people, animals and objects as actors of wandering - transitions between experience, memory and narration concerning wandering - experience, memory and narration of wandering and the present challenge of exile."
      Conveners: Dr. Marta Cobel - Tokarska (Akademia Pedagogiki Specjalnej im. Marii Grzegorzewskiej), Dr. Claudia Florentina Dobre (Centre for Memory and Identity Studies (CSMI))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.138
      • 11:00 The memory of women's care and hospitality in the context of their post-war wandering 20'
        The experience of wandering in its various dimensions has been the most important part of memory of Eastern, Central and Southern Europe in XX century. Work of that memory is still a rich source of wandering narratives. Among these narratives there are also women's diaries related to their postwar (IIWW) experiences. I intend to analyse these diaries using two categories - „care” and „hospitality”. These two categories are attributed to women and femininity and they are closely related to the private sphere which is their family life and home. But how do the care and hospitality work in the diaries of wandering and homeless women? And what is the gender perspective here? I intend to answer this question in my speech.
        Speaker: Dr. Izabela Skórzyńska (Adam Mickiewicz University Poznan, Poland)
      • 11:20 Migration crisis and polarization of Polish society - rivalry of two national identities 20'
        The migration crisis in 2015 provoked media panic in many European countries, including Poland. Refuges’ issue became part of the election campaign and divided Poles into two hostile camps: supporters of opening the borders to refugees ("humanitarian Europeans") and supporters of closing the borders to refugees ("defenders of faith and homeland"). 
        In this study I propose to analyze the polarization of Polish society in the context of the European migration crisis. Polarization of Poles in terms of accepting refugees has renewed the rivalry between two visions of national identity, one based on ethnicity and the other on civility which rewrite the nation in terms of a common, inclusive, civic ‘we’. 
        Based on moral foundations theory developed by Jonathan Haidt (2011) and the perspective of evolutionary psychology, I discuss the contemporary polarization of Polish society in the area of moral values and attitudes (openness/closure). Using data from social surveys in years preceding and following migration crisis, I found that the crisis was instrumentally used to sharpen existing society division and gather supporters for conservative political wing. The strategy proved to be effective and gave, first time in history after 1989, the parliamentary majority to single party.
        Speaker: Dr. Barbara Pasamonik (The Maria Grzegorzewska University)
      • 11:40 Lower Silesian heritage. Wandering cultures and difficult past 20'
        Lower Silesia is one of the regions that witnessed almost total population exchange as a result of the postwar border change. The former inhabitants, mostly Germans, were forced to leave and the new settlers came from Eastern Polish borderlands, France, Romania, Belgium and Bosnia. Lower Silesia became a melting pot not only of varied migrants’ groups (Poles, Ukrainians, Lemkos, Jews) but also of their material and intangible culture. The paper analyse the heritage Lower Silesia borderland from the perspective of difficult or contentious past incorporated into the material manifestations of culture.
          The authors posed the following questions: whether and how the heritage from the post-conflicted and post-migrant region can become familiar, ordinary, or even appreciated? What is the role of objects in wandering cultures: whether the wandering of people reflects and echoes in objects and narratives created around them? Which meanings of objects are affirmed and which ignored?
          The approaches towards contentious heritage will be considered by the example of the pottery produced in Boleslawiec. The city located in the Lower Silesia was for an extended period within the borders of Germany. Despite this, Boleslawiec pottery and ceramics are now widely recognized as a symbol of Polishness. The framework of interpretation will be indicated among others by the conceptions of “translocality” by Arjun Appadurai, the idea which we will transfer from the migration studies to the field of heritage studies.
        Speaker: Dr. Katarzyna Maniak (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Jagiellonian University)
      • 12:00 Memory, places, (not)belonging: the experiences of Ukrainian migrants from Poland do Canada 20'
        The subject of my attention is a group of people of Ukrainian descent who came from Poland to Canada in the 1980s. The empirical basis derives from ethnographic field studies conducted in 2014-2016 in Edmonton and Toronto in Canada. In total the research lasted 12 months. 
          The role of memory in migratory, resettlement, or dispersion circumstances and in diaspora conditions is extremely important, but also poorly recognized and usually underestimated by researchers. What makes such recognition even more difficult is the domination of European concepts of memory (J. Assmann, M. Halbwachs, P. Nora) in memory studies, under which memory is examined as a derivative of the category of nation and citizenship immersed in a relationship with the nation state. Therefore, contemporary theories of memory, placing it in a stable, unchanging environment, are inadequate to study the memory of immigrants. 
          The memory of Ukrainians from Poland is closely related to their migration and examining it provides knowledge about their identity ambiguity, modification and manipulation of belonging to particular communities within the Ukrainian and Polish diasporas, and with their relationship with Poland. I will try to show the phenomenon of migratory memory and the impact of local history of Ukrainians in Poland, especially the displacement of 1947, on their biographical trajectories, choices and identities. I consider the burden of 1947 as an important factor that shaped their decisions and influenced their migratory biographies.
        Speaker: Dr. Patrycja Trzeszczyńska (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 The Fires and Destructions in Rio and Elsewhere: What Is Anthropology Losing and What We Should Do? [WAU Special Session]: RT 1
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.43
      • 11:00 The Fires and Destructions in Rio and Elsewhere: What Is Anthropology Losing and What We Should Do? [WAU Special Session] 1h45'
        On 2 September 2018, the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro was burned down and totally destroyed. It was Brazil’s most important scientific museum with a collection of reportedly twenty million items including the most valuable materials for anthropological research. The incalculable loss was an epitome of the vulnerabilities and precarities in which anthropology and related disciplines are now placed. This is not an isolated incident but there are other “fires,” destructions and risks for them around the world. For instance, the name and category of anthropology/ethnology, departments and resources for anthropology in universities, and anthropological and other humanistic curricula in general have been variously threatened in many countries. Gender studies have become a target of aggression in particular. There are other related destructions, like the environmental disaster and human sufferings caused by the recent dam burst in Minas Gerais. This roundtable organized by WAU, the World Anthropological Union, in cooperation with the organizer of IUAES 2019 Congress will address these issues, placing the tragic loss at the National Museum in Rio at the center. We will try to grasp what was exactly lost, is being lost and will potentially be lost in these turns of events; what the nature, particularly structural, of precarities and vulnerabilities of anthropology is; and what we can and should do not only as individual anthropologists and as national anthropological associations but also as a global organization which is WAU with the IUAES and WCAA Chambers.
        Speakers: Dr. Junji Koizumi - Convenor (WAU/IUAES Osaka University/NIHU), Dr. Carmen Rial - Convenor (WAU/WCAA Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina), Prof. Michał Buchowski (Adam Mickiewicz University), João Pacheco de Oliveira (Museu Nacional, Brazil), Gustavo Lins Ribeiro (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana – Unidad Lerma, Mexico), Motoi Suzuki (National Museum of Ethnology, Japan)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Imagining and Practising Solidarities in Urban Contexts [Sponsored by the Commission on Urban Anthropology]: P 26.1

      Room 3.131

      From sanctuary cities to urban social movements and community activism, cities across the world generate inspirational ideas and practices that challenge the effects of global social inequalities and environmental destruction. Many societies have a tradition of informal dynamics of solidarity. One thinks, on the one hand, of various kinds of charities but also of individual actions that are aimed to help poor urban dwellers. On the other hand, cities are also seedbeds of organized urban movements, which can be transnational in scope. We are looking for contributions which build on concrete projects and programmes, as well as on everyday practices of collaboration and solidarity in urban contexts, including case material and ethnographically-based analysis of: - Actions in support of the socially and economically disadvantaged, and politically marginalised; - Practices aimed at building cooperative relations in neighbourhoods among native and non-native residents; - Social activism and its potential political impact; - The construction of solidarity through heritage practices, including the social role of memory and of historical forms of cooperation; - The drive to creating more sustainable environmental futures. We are interested in forms of co-operation among different urban dwellers, which might extend to formal and informal forms of support and solidarity.
      Conveners: Dr. Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia), Dr. Giuliana Prato (University of Kent)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.131
      • 11:00 Solidarity and commonalities in network sociality. 20'
        In mobility studies researchers concern mobility mainly as practices, technology, infrastructure and capital that maintains or reproduce already existing relations (Bissel 2013). There is lack of research that would examine how mobility produce new forms of proximity and mutuality of being (Bissel 2013; Glick Schiller and Salazar 2013). The rise of network sociality is especially visible in urban spaces and milieus. On the one hand networks are described as an effects of new connections that are results of technological developments which enabled mobility of people, goods, and ideas along routes and trajectories that come to be portrayed as networks (Castells 1996, Hannerz 1992). On the other hand, we witness the appearance of spontaneously emerging network patterns. People who are ‘consumers’ of implications of this networked movement of populations, power and capital in response are self-consciously organizing themselves into ‘networks’ of their own (Riles 2001; Wittel 2001).
          I would like to discuss concept of Andreas Wittel of network sociality (2001) as meaningful for describing practices and experiences of forming social relations, solidarity and reciprocity among migrants. Instead of looking at mobility as leading to erosion of enduring relationships, network sociality describes social relations as informational not narrational. They are based on exchange of data and constant integration and disintegration. This concept allows to escape from methodological nationalism and tendency to privilege fix boundaries while ignoring mediated interactions, commonalities and connectivity.
          The presentation will be based on fieldwork conducted among migrants and few initiatives organized for and by migrants in Trondheim, Norway.
        Speaker: Agata Kochaniewicz (Department of Social Anthropology, NTNU)
      • 11:20 Practices of Remembering and Belonging: Jewish Heritage and Civic Agency in Poland’s Haunted Urban Spaces 20'
        "Based on research in the Polish city of Wroclaw (conducted together with my colleague and co-author Juliet Golden) situated in the Polish city of Wroclaw, we investigate the potential of urban actors as agents of resilience and social change, focusing primarily on practices related to historical memory and heritage. We focus on creative modes of engagement with the past by these agents. We are particularly interested in the ways they deal with Jewish absences or voids (K. Till 2005; G. Zubrzycki 2016; JB Michlic and M. Melchior 2013) as a part of constructing contemporary modes of urban belonging. Our ethnographic study draws on interviews and observations of concrete individuals and institutions that specifically build their urban activity on sites of or in reference to the city’s Jewish heritage. Our examples include non-public schools, NGOs and Jewish cemeteries, which have become important locifor interaction with the past in the city’s landscape, a space largely devoid of actually living Jewish residents. We are interested in how the practices of historical memory of these urban agents in today’s Poland counteract the reactive historical politics of the state, directed at the suppressing and silencing of historical and actually existing social, political and cultural diversity. In this way, we explore how Jewish heritage in urban Poland becomes a gateway for the building of open society and inspiring civic engagement in times of rising state-inspired tribal nationalism and the degradation of national democratic politics. "
        Speaker: Dr. Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia)
      • 11:40 Reflexive Coexistence: Imagining and Practicing Solidarities in a Mixing Neighborhood 20'
        This paper is based on an ethnographic research that I conducted in the neighborhood of Hadar in Haifa (Israel), where Jews of different ethnic ancestry and Palestinians of different religions live together in what is commonly called “coexistence”. In Hadar I found that willingly or otherwise, people in the neighborhood are being subjected to a social practice of mixing. One of my main research findings is that living in a mixing neighborhood under the wider hegemonic discourse of separation in Israel creates an incommensurability that prompts social practices of reflexivity as a mechanism for confronting it, thereby creating what I call Reflexive Coexistence.
          
          However, assuming that reflexivity means de-naturalization of experiences and their consequences and not accepting things the way they are does not necessarily mean a determinist outcome of the practice of reflexivity. By analyzing several projects of social activism that took place in the neighborhood I will show how reflexivity can lead to a variety of ways to confront the incommensurability between the hegemonic discourse of separation and the experience of living in a mixing neighborhood: from working to eliminate the social mixing and restore the separation, to imagining alternative solidarities.
        Speaker: Dr. Regev Nathansohn (Sapir Academic College)
      • 12:00 Between volunteering, resistance and the neighbourhood: investigating imaginaries of solidarity in contemporary Turin 20'
        This paper investigates imaginaries of solidarity that are apparent in contemporary Turin (Italy). It firstly provides a contextualized understanding of the concept of solidarity by retracing its many forms within the twentieth century’s social economic history and industrial identity of the city. It then examines the marks left, the continuities and discontinuities in the ways solidarity is conceived by Turinese today. To do so, it discusses examples from the ethnographic experience of the author (as part of the research project "Food Citizens?Collective food procurement in European cities: solidarity and diversity, skills and scale") as well as city level public debates. More precisely, this material allows to study solidarity as part of volunteering and neighbourhood-based social activities. The discussion explicates how imaginaries of solidarity reproduced in these activities are infused with images from the past while intermeshing with contemporary issues of legality, distinction mechanisms, and the city neoliberal agenda.
        Speaker: Maria Vasile (Leiden University)
      • 12:20 The transformative character of the gift 20'
        Based on the consequences of the economic crisis of 2008, the entrepreneur, philanthropist and Buddhist Libor Malý decided to fulfil the vision of improving interpersonal relationships and creating an economic system that is able to complement the existing market economy in case of a new crisis. Moreover, his aim was to change the current paradigm into the so called “paradigm of generosity and kindness” and to ensure that people will be able to make the living by work they enjoy. For this purpose, he founded a “generous social network” Hearth.net which presents a space where users can offer and receive gifts without an expectation of a counter-gift. Hearth.net is supposed to provide the network of solidarities in the anonymous urban environment and the gift should be a tool which will allow the paradigm shift.
          The paper deals with the role of the gift within the current social and economic context and in relation to the daily practices of people living in the cities. The gift is not only “where obligation and liberty intermingle” (Mauss 1954: 83) but it gains transformative character and it allows the change of practices and values of few individuals. The paper analyzes the contemporary forms of the gift, gift-giving and generosity but also the imaginations of new sociabilities designed to cope with an anticipated social crisis. The analysis draws on the theory of human economy and anthropological discussions of the Maussian theory of the gift.
        Speaker: Barbora Stehlíková (Faculty of Humanities, Charles University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Islands Ethnography: Reflecting “islandness” in the anthropocene: P 28.1

      Room 3.129

      "In recent years, islands have experienced a hype in various research areas: flight and migration (Bachis 2016; Nimführ 2016; Mountz 2011), tourism (Wang 2017), ecology – with special reference to climate change, interspecies, and «friction» in the Anthropocene (Tsing 2005) – heritage making (Bujis 2016, Welz 2017), island cities and urban archipelagos (Grydehøj 2015) etc. Furthermore, there is an increased scientific interest on various forms of solidarities within islands and beyond them (e.g. Guribye & Stalsberg Mydland 2018; Reckinger 2013). The objectives of the proposed panel are three-fold: 1) to link research interests that address the historical and/or current discourses on “islandness” and geographical location, (political) dependence, resource management, energy transition and ecology, as well as sociocultural forms of island life; 2) to develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks that can be used to build common approaches for research on and about islands, and 3) to promote and facilitate discussion, information exchange and cooperation between ‘island researchers’ at European and international level. This panel, therefore, invites scientists, who work on islands or are doing research about islands, to give insights on their island research. These can deal with the special features, challenges and opportunities of the island both content analytical and method-theoretical. Likewise, questions of comparison, in which differences, similarities and intertwines of island research are worked out, can be analysed. The session is open to contributions that focus more specifically on issues impacting on islands and island life as well as on methodological issues in research on and about islands.
      Conveners: Dr. Francesco Bachis (University of Cagliari), Ms. Greca N. Meloni (University of Vienna), Mr. Sarah Nimführ (University of Vienna)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.129
      • 11:00 The contemporary sicilian ecofrictions against the industrial and military presence in the island: the noMUOS and noTRIV social movements 20'
        "In the sixties years the politic of economic development and american militarization of Sicily were addressed to resolve the economic and soclal gap between of island with the rest of Italy, and the securitization of meditarranean area against the soviet army power. The solutions were found in the industrial modernization of several coastal area of island, and in the build of several military infrastructures arround the sicilian coastal and internal areas. These politics of economic-social development and militarization were promoted both by industrial and politic world with a modernistic and industrial rethoric. and by atlantic military alliance (NATO) with a securitarian rethoric. The political-economic and social problems caused both by the industrial presence and NATO military presence in the island, were ignored by anthropological study (regional, italian and trans-national), much more focalised in the culture and social relations of agrotowns. 
          After the long years of deindustrialization of some sicilian industrial areas, and of extension of NATO military presence in the island, are emerging strong ecofrictions between the new politics both of industrial development/military securitazion and the local civic citizenship, to promote new forms of economic development, emergent forms of biodiversity and the demilitarization of island. 
          The paper is addressed to show the new faces of sicilian citinzenship, which to react against the politics of expropriation of territories with the build of industrial and military infrastructures. 
        Speaker: Alessandro Lutri (University of Catania)
      • 11:20 Living between Terra Longe and Terra Mamaizinha: Insularity and transnational family in Cape Verde migrations. 20'
        The Cape Verdean identity has been described and analyzed first of all through its insularity. The sea, at Cape Verde, makes the islander open to the outside, but, at the same time, closed and prisoner within the limits of the island (Bettencourt, 1998). This element historically reconnects to the production of gender boundaries that saw the islands as feminine and the exterior as masculine. Since the seventies on the island of Santo Antão (Cape Verde), there has been a gradual feminization of migration to Europe. Women migrated mainly with the aim of buying a house in the place of origin for themselves and their children, who often stayed at home with other women. These so-called "surrogate mothers" managed the new domestic space, revolutionizing the previous "sense" of home and giving life to a new form of transnational female family that connected places of immigration and places of origin. When emigration was mainly male, the boundaries of the inside/outside were played on the opposition between male/female, external/internal, Terra Longe (land of immigration) /Terra Mamaizinha (motherland), and danger/security. Nowadays, the feminization of Terra Longe, has led home to become a transnational space characterized as feminine. The boundary between inside and outside expands including Terra Longe. Home, thus, becomes synonymous of transnational female practices, where both groups of women, those who migrate and those who stay, manage together this new domesticity in a single continuum, taming a the space of Terra Longe, once perceived as dangerous.
        Speaker: Martina Giuffrè (University of Parma)
      • 11:40 The island as an imaginary space 20'
        The topographical uniqueness that provides islands their attraction has led since ancient times to the fact that the island motif has been an indispensable part of world literature and later also of the visual arts and film. As popular literary material, islands function as places of shipwrecks and adventures, of fear and terror, hope and salvation. Islands also gained an increased interest within science, in which both real islands and their fictionalization as well as the island as a ‘figure of thought’ are thematized. Similarly to belletristic island literature, forms of ""islanding"" (Baldacchino 2007) can also be observed in the scientific context by overemphasizing the island in the form of a seemingly hermetically sealed complex.
          The view of the island as an isolatable biotope is almost always a view from the mainland. This ‘mainland consciousness’ emanates from the mainland as normality and from the island as deviation. But also islanders can be producers of insular imaginations and processes of othering. To be able to sell their ""sea, sun and sand"", island images of paradise are used. Further, in order to prevent refugees and migrants from coming and staying, island images of the anti-paradise are created.
          As a non-islander and scientist who has conducted research on an island, my presentation will address different island imaginations, that I was confronted with during my research. Thereby, I will also reflect on my own island attributions.
        Speaker: Sarah Nimführ (University of Vienna)
      • 12:00 To be European in 2019 for a resident of an ultra-peripheral region of Europe 20'
        Located in the Indian Ocean, in the Mozambique Canal, the population of Mayotte is mainly of Bantu and Malagasy origin and the majority of the population speaks Shimaoré ; derived from the Swahili, and Kibushi ; derived from the Malagasy. While it is in an economic and social central position relative to the other islands of the archipelago of Comoros and Madagascar, Mayotte is located on the periphery of Europe since it has been part of one of its ultra-peripheral regions since 2011.
          From semi-directive interviews, we search to know the Mayotte inhabitant's perception of Europe in 2019 (Taglioni, 2006, 2010). What does it mean to be European for a Mahorais (Schnapper, 2000, 2003)? What representation do they have of Europe, the issues underlying its political, social and economic organization, and the impact of decisions taken at European level (Pelletier, 2006) on their local territory and daily lives (VItalian, 2002).
          
          Schnapper, D. (2003). La Communauté des citoyens. Paris. Gallimard.
          Schnapper, D. (2000). Qu’est-ce que la citoyenneté ? Paris. Gallimard.
          Taglioni, F. (2006). Les petits espaces insulaires face à la variabilité de leur insularité et de leur statut politique de, Annales géographie, n°652, p. 664-687.
          Taglioni, F. (2010). L’insularisme : une rhétorique bien huilée dans les petits espaces insulaires. Dans Olivier Sevin. Comme un parfum d’île, PUF, p. 421-435.
          Vitalien, C. (2002). Les régions ultra-périphériques entre assimilation et différenciation, Revue française d’administration française, n°101, p. 115-126.
        Speaker: Philippe Charpentier (Cufr Mayotte)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Evoking the intangible. Sensory media, anthropological film and art-based practice in engagements with epistemically challenging phenomena: P 21.1

      Room 3.132

      "Recent decades brought a surge of methodological experiments in anthropology: challenging or reinventing the formula of ethnographic film, embracing the creative possibilities of sensory media, and combining anthropology with art in fusions of creative practice, performance and ethnographic research. Interrelated circumstances necessitate such turn to alternative means of evoking and representing lived realties. For once, paradigmatic shifts in anthropological theory grasping at alternative modalities of being call for renewed encounters with topics that seemed to have been analytically tamed and foreclosed. Second, the need for ontological reframing called upon by acknowledging human and non-human lives in the anthropocene or its imminent wake. Third, the surge in technological developments that prompt existential questions about sentience, subjectivity and agency and ways in which these can be addressed anthropologically. The above description does not foreclose the range of challenges we must face and the means we can face them by employing non-textual or hybrid media. This panel welcomes anthropologists who seek or invent new methods and forms of engagement, contemporary artists and filmmakers drawn to anthropology, and those who operate across and beyond these disciplinary realms and question their boundaries."
      Conveners: Dr. Jan Lorenz (Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy), Dr. Piotr Goldstein (Trinity College Dublin)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.132
      • 11:00 360° FILM: Expanding the frame as a collaborative approach 20'
        In this paper, I will pursue the idea that using 360° films can be staged as a first step to both narrative and sensorial collaborative methods. During my current research, participants are invited to wear binaural microphones and 360° camera in order to travel an everyday walking path in autonomy. After meeting up with me, they will be engaged into a new experience of their path through a « virtual reality » helmet. Through it they will comment this stroll and discuss their impressions concerning both the digital tools and the urban space that they crossed, more specifically the ambiance of this space time. The restitution form of this work will be a 360° film installation, the public will be invited to wear a helmet broadcasting the film of the walk and the participants’ selected comments about their own impressions.
Placing the participants in the center of the image and sound production is a way to co-produce this research. Hence, engaging them into the reflexive work of visualizing and commenting on their own experience is a way to co-construct the research object.
          This methodology is involved into a research project in Lyon (France) on the links between urban ambiance and health: how the urban weave can affect physical activity for young people who got cancer. This experience, in first-person view, questions the kinds of impressions, sensations, that 360° films can translate through an immersive approach of film.
        Speaker: Hugo Montero (University Lumière Lyon 2)
      • 11:20 Cultural participation of young people making audiovisuals in Jantetelco, Morelos, Mexico. Notes on a methodology to study solidarity in the modes of organizing to make audiovisuals about the Day of the Dead Festival. 20'
        In the Municipality of Jantetelco, Morelos, Mexico, a group of young people have adopted the new technologies, gathering in artistic collectives and organizing to make audiovisual works in the form of documentaries, fiction and animated films, in order to revive and preserve the celebration of the ""Día de Muertos"". They have thus created agencies and made their cultural practices visible. Through a new methodological approach that analyzes the organization created by the agents to carry out their audiovisual works apart from industry and professional systems, the paper proposes a comparative method for observing new forms of cultural participation that constitute other ways of producing, preserving and disseminating culture. I understand cultural participation as a concept used in the study of the convergence between culture and media to refer to a new way of adopting technological instruments and devices to generate new audiovisual content, and thus, create and share distribution channels that are used in turn by the producers of corporate and hegemonic content (YouTube, Facebook). In this transition, people have ceased to be only spectators and consumers of content, in order to be recognized not only as creators, but also as citizens with cultural rights. Within this process, solidarityand creativityare explored and expressed, understood primarily as the spontaneous non-institutionalized expressions that people explore and construct in multiple material and immaterial works in which identity and cultural diversity are imprinted. 
        Speaker: Dr. Juan Carlos Domínguez Domingo (Centro Regional de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias (CRIM) de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM))
      • 11:40 Challenging the audience´s suspension of disbelief: Reflexive Practice and Collaborative Methods in Ethnographic Filmmaking 20'
        In this paper, I explore how a collaborative film can become “ethnographic” by proposing a critical relation with the audience through challenging the viewer´s suspension of disbelief. I follow Pink (2011) who proposed that ´ethnographic images´ do not exist in isolation or without a viewer, but rather that the ´ethnographic´ status can only emerge in the encounter with the audience.
          
          Rather than an element emerging from the editing suite, I suggest that reflexivity should be embedded in the practice from the field to the screen as a path to achieve the image´s ethnographic status. This approach stresses reflexivity as a central element of the filmmaking rationale from the conceptualization, creation and crafting of the images. It proposes questions to the audience about how the material was produced and why is presented in a specific way.
          
          To illustrate this I rely on analysing some of my own practice presented in the film ´This is my Face´ (2018), in which I experimented with reflexivity to challenge the audience´s suspension of disbelief. By expanding on Ruby’s conceptualizations of reflexivity (1977), I propose a way in which it can be used strategically as a means to critically engage in a dialogue with a wide audience. I suggest that if reflexivity emerges from the practice (from pre to post-production) and not as an expost activity (from the edit suite) it becomes part of the film´s diegesis without necessarily disrupting its narrative.
        Speaker: Dr. Angélica Cabezas Pino (The University of Manchester)
      • 12:00 Ruins of a Splendid Holiday 20'
        This paper concerns the memories of perpetrators of state violence, particularly lower level actors who carried out the murderous plan during the May 18 in 1980, Gwangju, South Korea. In 1980, Gwangju, located in the agricultural Honam region in South Korea, became a theater of state violence as a great many civilians were brutally killed by the martial law army. But we still know almost nothing about the “people” especially lower level actors who carried out the massacre. While the victims of the May 18 have been the subject of significant academic research since the 1990s, particularly after the democratization of South Korea, the perpetrators of state violence have rarely been featured in this landscape. I wish to examine the contrast between the visibility of victims and the invisibility of perpetrators.
        Speaker: Dasom LEE (Free University of Berlin)
      • 12:20 Digital Imaginings and Analog Hardware: Compositional Processes Revealed Through Interaction Between Human and Non-Human Actants 20'
        During collaborative compositional work in recording studios, spoken narratives were reduced to a series of vocable utterances, rendering the understanding of processes reliant on the technical understanding of the participants. Conversation about the progression of audio work is grounded in references to other signs, rather than cohesive descriptions of such. 
          
          Usage of analog hardware and its deployment within the studio illuminates an embedded strategy of compositional practice utilised by interlocutors as they engage more and more in the digital domain, and are cycling further away from analog studios and equipment. For my interlocutors, analog hardware was seen as a tool for physically manipulating the digital imagination. As the structure of a composition is sketched out in a digital audio workstation, such as Logic Pro, the work undertaken on a computer is seen as a cerebral process that demands little in physicality from the artist.
          
          I propose that the lack of physical engagement felt by artists during compositional performance is revived through the interaction with non-human actants. It is in the interfacing between human and machine that the awareness of capacity is realised, and that this is guided to sculpt the imaginings in the digital realm by engaging the body in real time manipulation of materials. This in turn creates a space of inquiry between the digital and physical engagements of musical practice, and narratives that arise during this transitory period reveal aspects of self-making that would otherwise remain silent and unspoken.
        Speaker: Holly Warner (University of St Andrews)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Writing for a public of non-anthropologists [Commission on Anthropology and Education]: W 1.1
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.19
      • 11:00 Writing for a public of non-anthropologists [Commission on Anthropology and Education] (Part 1) 1h45'
        The LAB experiments in practice a type of narrative different from the professional ethnographic writing. Creating stories, with a common framework, we want to reach a varied audience of both young people and adults, to entertain, intrigue, surprise, discover, excite and engage non-professionals in the experience of different cultures. Our aim is to encourage, outside the Academy, a more widespread sensitivity towards the figure of the anthropologist: after the workshop, we will publish some significant stories on the web and interact with the school international/national networks and with cultural institutions, eg museums. Activities: Preliminary exchange of information about the field experiences of each participant. Discussion starting from photographs or notes related to a particular episode. Analysis of narrative techniques suited to the goals to be achieved and to the recipients. Examination of multilingual tools and transversal anthropological themes, aimed at overcoming linguistic differences and highlighting commonalities and cultural diversities in the world. Definition of the main idea for some short stories. Verbal and written production (individual or in small groups) of narrative schemes. Study of a possible common frame for the single stories. Requirements: Registration is needed. Participants must have a field experience. We ask them to bring one significant picture, in their own laptop/smartphone/notebook, or a printed photo or some notes related to a particular episode in the field experience of which they were protagonists or witnesses. We suggest them to bring their own laptops or a paper notebook: during the workshop we will train to write short stories.

        Number of participants: 5 - 20
        Duration of the workshop: 210 min
        Pre-registration is required: Yes (Via the registration system)
        Contact to organiser: g.guslini@gmail.com, rpgajeet@gmail.com, sabine.klocke-daffa@ethno.uni-tuebingen.de
        Speakers: Giovanna Guslini ((Formerly) Ministry of Education, University and Research, Intercultural and International Training), Ajeet Jaiswal (Pondicherry University, Department of Anthropology), Sabine Klocke-Daffa (University of Tuebingen, Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Deconstructing Race: Biological or Social Concept?: P 19.1

      Room 2.103

      Race as a scientific concept arose in Europe in the eighteenth century, with the idea that humans can be subdivided into groups (subspecies) based on a set of morphological features and common geographic origin. Since the 1960s, an increasing number of anthropologists, especially in the United States, have successfully argued that biological race does not exist and emphasized that race is a socio-cultural construct. However, implicit assumptions of the race concept have not been eradicated. Moreover, in the current political climate, we are seeing the rise of nationalism and associated racial narratives that explicitly biologize social groups and construct geographic variation racially. Recently, some scientists have supported this narrative by publicly asserting that biological differences between human groups is evidence of the existence of race. This is an important time for anthropologists to work together, across sub-disciplines, to engage with race and we think this special IUAES Inter-Congress is an ideal venue. This panel will emphasize changes in the meaning of ‘race’ over time, paying special attention to the concept of race in modern research. The panel will bring together international scholars of biological and cultural anthropology to explore ways to develop and promote a shared anthropological perspective on race and human diversity. We will address both the resurgence of the race concept itself in science and society, and also the effects that the implicit assumptions of race have on the production of knowledge in anthropology.
      Conveners: Dr. Katarzyna A. Kaszycka (Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University), Dr. Rachel Caspari (Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, Central Michigan University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.103
      • 11:00 Biological Theories of Race Beyond the Millennium 30'
        The biological concept of race is ancient, beginning with creationist narratives and eventually becoming a part of the modern evolutionary paradigm. Unfortunately, our understanding of this concept has always been complicated by its association with human social and cultural practices, especially in regard to the classification of races within our species, anatomically modern humans. The prerequisite for the dismantling of false biological theories of race in humans was the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859, followed by The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex in 1871. Our modern understanding of biological concepts of race was furthered by the Neo-Darwinian synthesis of the early 20th century, the maturation of population genetics in the mid- to late 20th century, and finally the revolution in genetic sequencing technology of the 21st century.
          Unfortunately, modern genomic analysis of human biological diversity is often disconnected from the historical debates over the meaning of biological conceptions of race. This paper provides a summary of biological conceptions of race, why our species does not adhere to modern evolutionary conceptions of race, and how we may utilize this understanding to better utilize the power of modern genomic tools to solve crucial problems related to human biological diversity.
        Speaker: Dr. Joseph Graves Jr (North Carolina A&T State University)
      • 11:30 Anthropologists' and Biologists' Views on Race 30'
        Race, once the core concept in physical anthropology, is currently being rejected by an ever growing number of anthropologists in the United States (85 percent in 2013). In Poland, at the beginning of the 21st century, the concept of race was rejected by only 25 percent of professional physical anthropologists. Between 2013–2014 the academic community (professors and students) in biology, cultural anthropology, and a group of biological anthropologists were surveyed to assess their current views on race.
          Apart from the question on the existence or non-existence of races in humans, we gathered and analyzed opinions on: supposed racial characteristics by which races differ from one another, the number of races people can be divided into, whether race is a concept that is needed in science, what the term 'race' should symbolize today, and whether participants were familiar with the term 'social race'.
          The survey data show, on the one hand, that the belief in human races is generally shared by the Polish academic community: race was accepted by three-fourths of cultural anthropologists and four-fifths of biologists. On the other hand, an awareness of the non-existence of races in our species became visible among a group of young adepts of biological anthropology. It is suggested that general persistence of racial thinking about human variation is, to a large extent, a consequence of the homogeneous character of Polish society, educational factors, and lack of scientific debate over race.
        Speaker: Dr. Katarzyna A. Kaszycka (Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University)
      • 12:00 Re-configuring ethno-racial boundaries in the National Genographic Project (NGP). Science and 'soft' racism. 30'
        As a legitimate concept for scientific inquiry and explanatory of human diversity race has been widely contested in the social sciences and critical biology (Goodman 2000; Marks 1995 & 2003; Ingold 2008) . Racial thinking has been publicly rejected as scientifically wrong and politically incorrect, even in the biosciences. However, contemporary science (evolutionary studies, population genomics, epidemiology, biomedicine) take it for granted that human variation can be clustered into genetically based groups. Distributing people and individuals into natural(ised) kinds suspiciously brings back narratives of racial disparities. This sort of 'soft' racism (Saldaña-Tejeda & Wade, 2017) seriously bias epistemologies and theories, jeopardizing design quality, methodological robustness, sound data production and accuracy of meaningful results, i.en. in the bioscience field (Fausto-Sterling, 2003). The National Genographic Project (NGP) was launched in 2005 by the National Geographic Society with the purpose of locating human genetic signatures of ancient human migrations (Behar et al., 2007). By collecting mtDNA and Y chromosome DNA samples ancestry could be tracked down to past populations geographically distributed in the world and their migratory patterns established . This paper will explore the NGP classificatory system of populations and how it is organised around non-coherent inconsistently coalesced criteria (i.e. “native American” “sub-Saharan African” “indo-european”, cf. TallBear, 2007) that, nonetheless do not attribute any role other than biological principia for human diversity. Quite the opposite. Populations defined exclusively by DNA differences resonate too much with what racial categories stand for (FROCGLOB, HAR2017-86776-P, 2018-2020. Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation)
        Speaker: Prof. Eugenia Ramirez-Goicoechea (Dpt. Social Anthropology, UNED)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Audiovisual Session: AV 1

      Room 2.122

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.122
      • 11:00 A Woman Who Paints Thangka (画唐卡的女子) 26'
        Rebgong is located in Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai province in China. Rebgong has been the center of Tibetan Buddhist Thangka art for centuries. However, Rebgong Tibetan women were not allowed to paint or to learn Thangka until recent years. In 2013, I met Lutso, one of the few Tibetan female Thangka painters in Rebgong. The film captures her unique life as a female student in a Thangka art School in 2013, as well as her life and career as a professional painter with a family to support five years later.

        2018, China and USA/Shooting locations: Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in China/Original language: Mandarin, Tibetan
        Speaker: Ming Xue (American Museum of Natural History)
      • 11:26 Kashi Labh/Original title: Kashi Labh 43'
        Aesthetics of dying, family as a unit of care and the last vital breath in Kashi, India’s sacred city. My interlocutor Shiv’s dying mother announced to the family, ‘it calls me’. Terminally ill, barely able to communicate and be understood by others, she found her life impossible. Subsequently, with her family by her side, she embarked on an arduous journey to Kashi—India’s holy city—to release her last vital breath and achieve the ultimate possibility of existence in Moksha. Reflecting upon my work with families who make a pilgrimage to Kashi, this research examines audiovisual ethnography as a shared ontological approach to researching and understanding the imaginative lifeworlds family members inhabit while waiting, confronting and performing the dying process of their parent at Kashi Labh Mukti Bhawan (a local salvation home).

        India, 2018/Shooting locations: Varanasi/Original language: Hindi
        Speaker: Rajat Nayyar (York University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development: P 7.1

      Room 2.21

      "Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development” is based on significant events of present era demonstrate that anthropology has established a new grip in the public sphere—one can make the most of novel forms of communication to reach far beyond the academic activities to distribute knowledge widely and freely. This focuses on different contemporary areas of vigorous anthropological research in future that also addressed some of the natural life most extreme problems and issues. Anthropology believes in a model of development that is more people centric. One that focuses on issues such as environment, poverty, food security, gender, social justice, inclusive growth etc. Such a model, we believe, needs to take culture as an important component of the idea of sustainable development with world solidarity and peace. Anthropology as a discipline enable the cultivation of certain modes of thinking which will prepare individuals and societies to face these three urgent challenges of the twenty first century: solidarity, peace and development. As a discipline, Anthropology can lend a powerful voice to non–hegemonic and marginalized cultural perspectives on Solidarity, Peace and Development, and thereby lead to more fruitful conversations on the topic.
      Conveners: Dr. Iswa Chandra Naik (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha), Dr. Raghuraman Trichur (California State University), Ms. Dwiti Vikramaditya (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.21
      • 11:00 The Open Society Must Be Defended. Notes on Values, Language and Deeds. 20'
        This paper's title recalls foucaultian philosophy of epistomological indicators in the context of the concept of the Open Society. This bergsonian idea, later developed by Karl Popper and others is today at the center of an ongoing criticism formulated not just towards this idea, but also towards cultural diversity, multicultural politics and democracy in general. Before we announce however the end of democracy as we know it, we might ask ourselves if this criticism has any real substance? Anthropological inquiries show that cultural diversity is being socially accomodated on several levels, among which norms, language and agency are the most obvious.This paper takes these areas of cultural foundations and presents the idea of Open Society in a more diversified light. It highlights the ways anthropologcal theory and practice embrace the social and political surroundings and give it a public apperance which goes beyond the level of politics. It stays however grounded in a more pragmatic sense of necessity to act upon ongoing processes of dissasembling the democratic values which lay behind the Open Society formula. My thesis here is based on a profund belief that anthropology still remains an important player within the public discourse in many Western societies, or at least it still has kept it's transformative power to inititae a more fact based debate on how diversity and subjectivity might today be maintained and paired with the interests of the state.
        Speaker: Dr. Jarema Drozdowicz (Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań)
      • 11:20 People’s participation in developmental programmes and sustainable development among the Parajas of Odisha, India 20'
        Speaker: Dr. RUDRANI MOHANTY (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF ORISSA, KORAPUT)
      • 11:40 Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences (KISS) Reflects a System of Social Solidarity, Peace and Development: An Overview 20'
        Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences – KISS, Bhubaneswar, India is a fully free, fully residential home for 27000 marginalized indigenous children who are provided holistic education along with boarding and health care facilities besides life skills empowerment.
          
          KISS as a system of solidarity, peace and development: -
          
          KISS Promotes: - Quality, Holistic & Complete Education
          Girl Child Education
          Vocational & life Skills Education
          Comprehensive Healthcare
          Assured Career Opportunities
          Cleanliness and Hygiene
          Afforestation
          Sustainable Development
          Quality sports education 
          KISS Arrests: - Naxalism/ Antisocial activities
          Hunger and Malnutrition
          Poverty
          Child Labor
          Early Girl Child Marriage
          Superstitious Practices
          Human Trafficking
          Half Education
          Deforestation
          Dropout Besides formal education, KISS also imparts:- Vocational Training
          Mother tongue based multilingual education for primary students
          Physical education and discipline learning (NCC, NSS, Scout & Guide, Youth Red Cross)
          English classes through the English Access Microscholarship Program 
          Special Features of KISS: - Skill Development Program: The program links education with productivity, economic development & individual prosperity among the indigenous masses. International Internship and Volunteering Program: The Program is to enable likeminded young global students and professional to be associated with KISS in order to enable creative thought leadership. Life Skills Education based Adolescent Reproductive Sexual Health (UNFPA supported): The Program is in order to enable indigenous world to deal with the demands and challenges in their life effectively.
        Speaker: Krupasindhu Nayak (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, Deemed University)
      • 12:00 Socioeconomic Development and an Applied Anthropology of Cyberspace 20'
        Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, and smart cities have emerged as topics of intellectual inquiries regarding socioeconomic development. Anthropology’s encounter with cyberspace as a public sphere has been problematized through the debates around digital ethnography, urban space, and computational anthropology among others. This paper draws on some of the emerging trends in recent anthropological accounts of science, technology and development to find out the gaps within theory and methods. It argues there are various limitations of the anthropological engagement with the digital world that demands multidisciplinary perspectives for an applied anthropology of cyberspace.
        Speaker: Dr. Muhammad A. Z. Mughal (King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Connecting people through sports (Commission on the Anthropology of Sports): P 15.1

      Room 1.71

      Sports has been, currently and thorough its history from the 19th century, an arena where people are simultaneously connected and isolated, exercise their solidarity and fighting for their supremacy. Many groups and individuals use sportive practices and events in order to improve their visibility, to claim their identities, and to share experiences through the world. Not only a place of confrontations, sports also connect people from different backgrounds and create new networks. In an environment of competitions and rivalry, sport practitioners sharing some goals, constraints, and sense of solidarity (between teammates, for example) can become a community of practice, in a short or long term. How do people and groups build their identities and networks through sportive events and practices? How dimensions of competitions and solidarities in sports are articulated by individuals and groups, spectators and practitioners, to create new kinds of communities? Did an Anthropology of sports can allow a new understanding of the concept of "relationship"? In this panel, our aim is also to create a place where the concepts of "solidarity" and "connection" can be articulated in two different ways among scholars. In the first sense, by connecting researches from different countries and theoretical perspectives, in a possible more collective and comparative studies. In the second sense, focusing primarily on the political dimension of sportive practices, connecting different areas (gender, identities, and others) of interest of the Anthropology of Sports, around a common theme.
      Conveners: Dr. Luiz Rojo (Universidade Federal Fluminense), Dr. Jérôme Soldani (Universite Paul Vallery)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71
      • 11:00 Memories of sports in Taiwan. Remember, forget and feel to belong 20'
        Sports are as much a provider of memories as sensations, both linked, which are powerful markers of belonging to multiple levels, for an individual as for a group. It is not only about opposition through confrontations, punctual or regular, because to play according to the same rules is to share a moment, a space, a memory in common. Choosing to favor a sport other than the one favored by neighbors also means making its own difference.
          
          With a sporting history of more than a century and displaying a certain heterogeneity in the geographical and social distribution of practices - contrary to what the apparent hegemony of baseball and basketball suggests - Taiwan offers a complex sports space where the entanglement of individual and collective experiences helps to build a form of cultural intimacy. From this point of view, how the memories made up of sports practices are constitutive of the mechanisms of belonging in the Taiwanese context?
          
          In an ethnographic perspective, based on observations and discourses collected during several surveys on the Taiwanese sports system, between 2006 and 2016, this paper proposes to question the personal relationship that Taiwanese have with some sports practices or teams through their experiences and memories; how the memory shared around some sporting events aggregate people within groups in the Taiwanese contexts and, finally, how evocation of memories, forgetting, or sometimes the voluntary obliteration of facts or persons are the frame of identity claims founded on the memory and the affirmation of values.
        Speaker: Dr. Jérôme Soldani (CERCE (Université Montpellier 3))
      • 11:20 Solidarities in football: the case of Russian and Serbian hardcore fans 20'
        Recent studies of football fandom demonstrate that interaction between hardcore fans does not always boil down to a binary contest of ‘us’ and ‘them’. The mechanisms employed by football supporters in order to structure and define ‘others’ are complex, often based on current cultural, and socio-economic contexts. The paper addresses the question of solidarity or ‘imagined brotherhood’ between Russian and Serbian hardcore fans.
          The paper focuses on two dimensions of the constructed brotherhood: national and football. The discourse of Russia and Serbia being brotherly nations exists on the national level and is actively boosted by modern politicians. The discourse is based on ideas of shared ethnic and religious background and history, which echoes the nationalistic ideology of hardcore fans in both countries.
          The second dimension is football one, where there are commonly recognised ‘brotherhoods’ between certain clubs. The fans of two rivalry clubs from Moscow (Spartak and CSKA) and two from Belgrade (Red Star and Partizan ) formed cross-national alliances accordingly.
          Basing on long-term qualitative fieldwork among hardcore fans both in Russia and Serbia, the paper aims to discuss coexisting of the nationalistic ‘brotherly’ discourse along with practices of football rivalries in the culture of hardcore fans. It further analyses the influence of a researcher’s background (namely national identity and football allegiance) on the fieldwork.
        Speaker: Julia Amatuni (European University at St. Petersburg)
      • 11:40 Female solidarities in a hostile world? The role of amateur football teams for young women from lower classes in Rio de Janeiro 20'
        Young women from lower social strata represent one of the most unprivileged groups in Brazilian society, especially when they are black, indigenous, from North, Northeast or Southeast of Brazil. They are likely to suffer from forms of stigmatization for their social origin, gender and skin color, have smaller educational and professional perspectives and are more likely to be victims to certain illnesses or of domestic violence. In Rio de Janeiro, a growing number of young women from lower class practice amateur football in their free time. The women meet several times per week, for training and football tournaments. Overall, they spend an important part of their leisure time together. The presentation – based on empirical research results of my PhD thesis research – analyzes the role of amateur football practices in the life of young female players. In what way, do football practices and team experiences create new solidarities among the women, which can enhance their chances to overcome difficulties of their daily life? Beside understanding the benefits of collective female sport practices in contexts of social and gender inequalities, the paper argues that amateur football itself represents kind of a ‘hostile’ space for young women, due to a history of discriminations and gender conflicts in Brazilian football.
        Speaker: Julia Hass (Freie Universität Berlin)
      • 12:00 Consociate Relationships and Community in Youth Swimming Clubs 20'
        Swimming is a sport that takes an incredible amount of commitment from youth, parents, and coaches. Spending such an extended period of time with the same people—between 3 hours and 25 hours training per week, not to mention the all weekend long competitions—youth swimmers developed friendships and consociate relations (Dyck 2002) with their fellow swimmers, as one would with work colleagues or classmates. One example of community in youth sports are these momentary, ephemeral ‘communities’ that form out of consociate relations between athletes, coaches, and parents, often for a season of play or during a road trip (Dyck 2002). Consociate relationships may form through the everyday interactions that kids have with other swimmers, parents, and coaches in their own, and with other clubs at swim meets. Noel Dyck describes consociate relationships as requiring “putting names to known faces and telling stories about mutually shared experiences in the world of community sports” (2012, 67). Following Dyck, I would argue that youth swimmers use these relationships to further their own ends. They forge new relationships with peers and competitors in other clubs and construct their identities through shared practices in training and competition. They can also choose to cultivate these relationships and develop them into other types of friendships. Swimmers who go to the same meets are able to share their stories of victory or defeat in their races against their club peers and those youths from other clubs.
        Speaker: Sean Heath (University of Brighton)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Indigenous Museum, Objects, Cultural Heritage and Reconnaissance Policies [Commission on Museums and Cultural Heritage-COMACH]: P 27.1

      Room 3.130

      Cultural heritage is the main theme of this panel which intends to discuss the relationship between property rights of artifacts, but also territory and resources and stories about the mediators of knowledge, including ethics, politics and stories of recognition, as well as their potential of the transformation of museum practices of indigenous peoples, based on recent experiences in traditional museum institutions. The presentations will address issues related to Amerindian collections, analyzing cultural heritage strategies linked to these objects and issues related to broader claims of indigenous peoples' rights. It also aims to discuss recent experiences with conservation practices and exhibitions, promoting debate in venues where current museum discussions are blurring the traditional perception between ethnographic and art museums. The purpose of this panel is also to create a dialogue between museum professionals and Amerindians peoples by examining the dimensions of intrinsic ethics and politics, and stories of recognition often overlooked in current museum practices.
      Conveners: Dr. Renato Athias (UFPE), Dr. Alexandre Gomes (NEPE/UFPE), Dr. Pascale De Robert (IRD/France)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.130
      • 11:00 Prospect and Retrospective Dimension of Chhowa Dance: the Cultural Heritage of Erstwhile Manbhum District of Eastern India 20'
        The present paper aimed at identifying the different factors that contributed in the continuity of the Chhowa dance in this specific zone of Eastern India and how it is responsible in developing cohesion in time and space.The socio cultural function examined in terms of prospect and retrospective dimension.The Challenges encountered in the contemporary society are also identified .It is further observed that the dance not only brings name and fame to the people and the region concerned but it has been successful in weaving solidarity amongst the people and establishing cultural identity of its own.It has become a part and parcel of wider cultural spectrum. The decade long observation in the region and interview with the performing artist as well as focus group discussion with chhowa dance team was brought into application to confirm its reliability and validity.Effort was also made to understand the growth of its popularity from regional to international level.
        Speaker: Dr. Sudhanshu Mahato Mahato (A. S. College, Deoghar)
      • 11:20 Emerging Heritage Communities in Shantou (Swatow): Transmitters, Experts and Enthusiasts The Chaoshan Region Indigenous ‘Qiaopi’ Museum and the STU Chaoshan Special Collections 20'
        Cultural heritage is passed on from generation to generation and refers to the customs, practices, places, objects, artistic expressions and values of a community. Heritage is therefore frequently described and measured in terms of significance, things that give meaning to everyday life, carried on from the past to the future.
          This paper/presentation will focus on two indigenous Culture Heritage projects in Shantou (Swatow):
          1. The Qiaopi Museum (侨批文物馆) (Shantou, Guangdong, China).
          Qiaopi are remittance receipts in the form of family letters from overseas Chinese to their families in China. Qiao means “emigrants” and pi means “letters.” Most of the surviving qiaopi have been preserved by archives in Guangdong and Fujian. In light of their uniqueness, qiaopi and yinxin were recognized in June 2013 as the world’s documentary heritage on the list of the UNESCO Memory of the World.
          2 The Shantou University (STU) -Library Chaoshan Special Collections (潮汕特藏网)
          This paper/presentation will examine how local members of a community are involved in the documentation, interpretation, and management of cultural heritage. It argues that only through such diverse and multiple civil efforts which run counter to the official top-down approach currently in place in many Chinese cities can heritage protection be ensured and ultimately the local culture kept alive. Furthermore,in the second part of this paper/presentation will explore the Chaoshan Special Collections Digital Archive at STU Library especially the Shantou Treaty Port Multi-Media Digital Resource Archive and related sections.
        Speaker: Dr. Karsten Krueger (Shantou University Center for Global Studies)
      • 11:40 Cultural Spectacles, Festivals and Cultural Heritage: Problems and Prospects of Museumisation, Standardization and Preservation 20'
        This paper looks into various aspects of cultural spectacles and festivals to understand various nuances. Cultural spectacles are generally cultural performances celebrated by a community where material and non-material cultural objects are presented for the outside world. It can be best defined as where a group represent themselves for its own members and to the non-members. Such spectacles give the scope of preservation and promotion of various cultural artifacts especially intangible cultures of a community. However, performing of the intangible cultural heritage out of the context and growing up of an ethnic market in such cultural spectacles does not only solidify the identity of the group rather it is also a process of museumisation of the cultural artifacts. It further serves various functions. This paper is the outcome of the ethnography of the Karbi Youth Festival – a cultural spectacle celebrated by the Karbis, an ethnic community of the state of Assam, India. The paper investigates how the community is itself engaged in preservation and promotion of their cultural heritages. The paper also delves into the aspects of museumisation, various functions of the spectacle and how it has helped in forming of politicized ethnicity.
        Speaker: Dr. Prafulla Nath (Assam University Diphu Campus)
      • 12:00 Histories of museum collections from brazilian amazonia ans experts knowledge invoked along its way 20'
        Currently working on my PHD thesis in Social anthropology directed by Nicolas Adell at Toulouse university, I analyse the digital potential to spread around museum collections from the Amazonian case. This subject follows my postgraduate researches on ethnographical collections histories, understood as witnesses of exchanges and links between states, institutions and peoples. For this, I am part of the PHD workshop « Le musée comme terrain. Stratifications des héritages coloniaux » (CNRS, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales de Paris, ENS/ PSL Research University) mainly directed by Benoit de l’Estoile (CNRS).
          The amazonian inventory was personally done during my research internship at PALOC research center (UMR 208, IRD/MNHN, Paris) administrated by Pascale de Robert (UMR PALOC) and Lucia van Velthem (Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem, Para State, Brasil). I demonstrated the equal importance of the institution policies and the person, both deep-seated in particular contexts and networks, behind a museum collection .
          My work’s target was to select a list of interesting museum artefacts to be expertised by indigenous representatives (Kayapo and Baniwa). The meeting happened last spring 2018 with brazilian and french scientists during the research program “Collection des Autres et mises en mémoire : objets, plantes et récits d’Amazonie“ (COLAM, IRD/MNHN, Sorbonnes-Universités). I have assisted them expertising and offering new glances about museum collections inside reserves of Musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, Muséum de Toulouse, Ecomusée de Cuzals, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle and Musée de l’Homme.
        Speaker: Anouk Delaitre (Université de Toulouse - Jean Jaurès)
      • 12:20 “Múltiplas intenções”. O Museu Goeldi e coleções de patrimônios indígenas 20'
        A apresentação considera o Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi e aborda questões conectadas com a formação, composição e salvaguarda de suas coleções de patrimônios culturais indígenas amazônicos. Serão enfocadas experiências relacionadas com práticas museológicas de documentação e exposição destas coleções, considerando as múltiplas intenções, reivindicações,"olhares" que estão em jogo nestas práticas.
        Speaker: Dr. Lucia Hussak van Velthem (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Young Adult Women and their Biological and Social Roles in Contemporary World: [Commission on Anthropology of Women]: P 20.1

      Room 3.45

      There is growing evidence for changing pattern of reproductive behaviour among young adult women aged 18-35. They are now more likely to remain childless, have their first child in their early/late 30s substantially limit the number of offspring and to be fully-paid working as compared to their peers over twenty five years ago. Yet, these women have to confront conflicting expectations at home and at the work place. Aiming at better understanding a work-home discrepancy (social vs biological roles), the panel discussion will focus on psychosocial constraints of women’s biology. Following issues will be discussed: the biological capacity of young women for pregnancy and motherhood; women’s multiple roles, psychosocial stress exposure and acute stress responses in women’s biology, health and quality of life; workplace conditions, systemic sexism, and how anthropology research is working and producing evidence that sexism impacts biology and hinders women’s progression in the work place. A multifactorial approach in cross-cultural research using different explanatory models should bring the framework for the final conclusion and recommendations.
      Conveners: Prof. Maria Agnieszka Kaczmarek (Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy), Dr. Ga Wu (YASS Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences HAO)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.45
      • 11:00 Young mothers out of wedlock in the second half of 20th century in South Korea 20'
        This presentation aims to bring forth the social status of young unwed mothers, which counts only on their social or family acceptance, not on their biological role. Their biological role may be restrained by their social role, which is imposed by the “normality” of having to “be married” in order to become a mother. The presentation highlights an empirical study made in situ among South-Korean unmarried mothers. This study focuses on the contemporary period - the second half of the 20th century, during which, when these women became mothers, the family law known as “Hoju system” was effective which only allowed to register children born under their legal father. Since this law has been abolished in 2005, the situation of unwed mothers has changed. We will emphasise here how this kind of legal acceptance influences the ideology of ‘normality’ as a social discrimination against the natural or biological role of women. The study further emphasises that these women’s social role tends to reduce them in the sense of shame, not only at the personal but also at the family level. This explains why, among several other reasons, South Korea has sent overseas around 200,000 of its children under the label of “abandoned ones” since the middle of the 20th century. This fact invites us to reconsider who has really abandoned these children and how the shameful identity of these women as young unwed mothers under the patriarchal society has contributed to this abandonment of their children.
        Speaker: Dr. Clara Hyun-Jung Lee (EHESS/LAIOS)
      • 11:20 A lens on the health paradox of young females 20'
        Young adulthood, defined as ages 18-25, is a critical period in the female life course. It is time of navigation the transition to adult roles. Young women make choices that may involve higher education, profession and occupation/employment (socioeconomic roles – transition from student to worker) as well as marriage and childbearing (family roles both biological and social). Physical and mental changes, though less dramatic than in adolescence, continue to occur and individuals begin the steady weight gain and some psychological changes that will characterize adulthood. The aim of this study was to show evidence for health paradox in women at their early reproductive age. The term paradox signifies a contradiction between the biological status of young adulthood and chronic conditions observed in this period of life. A literature search was performed of SCOPUS, PubMed, Medline and Google Scholars reviews for the years 2010-2018. Following conditions were studied: (i) metabolic syndrome (MetS) with elevated weight, blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus type 2; (ii) lupus; (iii) endometriosis; (iv) myasthemia gravis; (v) dysmenorrhea; (vi) polycystic ovary syndrome (POCS); (vii) hormonal imbalance; (viii) sexually transmitted diseases (STD); (viv) healthy risk behavior such as. unprotected sex, substance abuse; (x) conditions related to nutrition and micronutrients deficiencies; (xi) mental health. It was found that the rate of various conditions across the age transition varied considerably and was associated with educational experience and expectations. It seems to be a paradox when contrasting with maximum potential for childbearing in this period of life.
        Speaker: Prof. Maria Kaczmarek (Department of Human Biological Development, Institute of Anthropology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University)
      • 11:40 Motherhood or career? Female role models in a changing world. 20'
        Female role models changed dramatically during the twentieth century. Wife and mother are no longer the only accepted ""natural"" roles of women and higher education and occupational career became increasingly common in many societies. Furthermore, emancipation and the availability of effective contraceptives provided the possibility to plan reproduction and to depart from unwanted aspects of reproduction and occupying exclusively the mother role. Consequently, women are able to choose between motherhood and other activities. These new opportunities have a major impact on reproductive behavior, especially of young women. In general, increasing education lead to childbearing delay or voluntary childlessness. In all high income countries age at first birth is increasing, a trend with dramatic biomedical as well as social consequences. On the one hand, the postponement of first reproduction increase the risk of remaining involuntarily childless, on the other hand the complications during pregnancy and childbirth are more common among so called late mothers. As a consequence, the number of offspring among highly educated and successful women is decreasing because young women still suppose that they have to decide between occupational career and motherhood. This dilemma of young women is discussed from the viewpoint of Evolutionary Anthropology.
        Speaker: Prof. Sylvia Kirchengast (Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna)
      • 12:00 Gender effects on health outcomes in rural Jigawa State, Nigeria 20'
        We analysed a DHS (Demographic and Health Survey) dataset on health and living conditions indicators among 1021 children (51% girls, 49% boys), under 5 years of age, living in rural areas of Jigawa State, Nigeria. The percentage of overall undernutrition is very high with 59% of the children being classified as stunted, and 43% as underweight. There is a gender effect on health and nutritional outcomes, with boys showing lower mean values for weight-for-age and weight-for-height than girls. Maternal characteristics such as: age at the time of the survey, age at first birth, educational level, and perceived autonomy in the household, also impacted on the health of the children. Variables on water, sanitation, and hygiene also associated with overall health and nutritional status of the children, in some cases, mediated by gender. 
          More than 40% of the mothers agreed that husbands are allowed to beat them when women argue, go out of the home without asking permission, neglect their children, or refuse sexual intercourse. This presentation will disuss in detail maternal and child health outcomes that associated with different family dynamics and perceptions of basic women's rights.
        Speaker: Dr. Ines Varela-Silva (Loughborough University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 (Im)Mobilising Longing: subversive potentials and seductive snares between distance and desire: P 1.1

      Room 3.94

      Practices, trajectories, and places of longing are keys to the imaginative horizons (Crapanzano, 2003) and the alternative utopias (Kiossev, 2013) of individuals and societies. Yet, if “belonging” holds a prominent place in contemporary Anthropology, the notion of “longing” has tended to appear in a more marginal position. This panel furthers a recent shift of perspective from belonging to longing that research on nostalgia, on hope and yearning, or on tourism and migrant imaginaries has initiated in the past years. We invite presenters to address longing as a human strategy, cultural technique, affective and possibly spiritual engagement with the world – one that operates across time and space and is able to transcend them through a negotiation between distance and desire. This panel suggests a reflection on global practices of longing and their moral, political, economic, and spiritual trajectories in the light of desired change, necessary resistance, experienced loss, and regimes of consumption (of mobility, imaginaries, romance). In the light of the overall conference theme of “world solidarity”, longing has particular relevance – acts of solidarity often occur hand in hand with shared senses or traditions of longing. Deepening the link with the congress theme, we call contributors to consider the subversive potential of longing, the seductive traps that longing can create, and the mobilizing capacity of longing for individuals and societies. We particularly welcome papers that explore longing as intersection of personal experiences, cultural environments of longing (eg. Sehnsucht, saudade, dor, akogare), and global narratives (incl. tourism, consumption, neoliberalism).
      Conveners: Dr. Hannah Wadle (FairerTales), Dr. Lukasz Kaczmarek (Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.94
      • 11:00 When the relationship is restructured – the ethnography of a teddy bear hospital in Japan 20'
        It is a newly started survey report at a teddy bear hospital in Japan. This “hospital” repairs teddy bears just like human beings. Users are more adults than children. In psychiatry, it is considered as a kind of problem. However, anthropologists can see it from another view point.
         
        A teddy bear is stable in the predictable range as well as the feel when the owner touches, the expression, the smell, and so on. That stability gives the owner sense of security and creates a stable and closed relationship between the owner and the teddy bears.
         
        But a malfunction of the teddy bear shakes its stability. The malfunction of the teddy bear makes the owner recognize the accidental property as a material and anticipates ""death"". The ""story of illness"" is also closely related to the owner's own life. When the teddy bear is invaded such as cotton exchanging and suturing for repairing, that teddy bear is in the midst of instability, and the owner feels anxiety. The relationship which had been closed between the two becomes to be opened to others.
         
        The mutual negotiating resonance of the body and materials create a consciousness of some kind of network or commonality. The owners look back on the relationship with their teddy bears through the task of writing memories with the teddy bear in the ""medical record"" before repairing and experiencing being separated by their teddy bear’s ""hospitalization"", then they rebuild the relationship with their teddy bears.
        Speaker: Dr. Michiko SAWANO (Ritsumeikan University)
      • 11:20 Sending Love and Money from Abroad. The Affective Side of Migrants’ Involvement in Development Projects at Home 20'
        In this paper I would like to explore the potentialities of thinking about longing as an activating force for migrant long-distance engagements. The unparalleled extent to which migrants help the home country from abroad can possibly be understood better if we look at emotions, affects, and desires: of being closer to what one longs for, of paying back what one feels one lost, of leaving an imprint of one’s love on the place of imagination deemed most valuable. In researching migration and development (Faist 2008, among others), affective vocabularies and theories and rarely involved, leaving the field to economic reasons and rationales, to the logic of acting out the lack of acceptance in the new country, and to the bare aspects of power. As much as these aspects are a part of the immigrant experience of engagement in development projects and investments at home, a huge part of this experience is being left out by using this perspective. 
          Writing about long-distance care in Filipino migration to the US I analysed the rhetorical aspects of kinship terminology, however I would like to deepen it in my paper by looking closer at the way different emotions are expressed and evoked in the narratives of helping, reaching out, and giving back to the home country.
        Speaker: Dr. Helena Patzer (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Scinces)
      • 11:40 (Be)longing practices in the social world of literature. A case study of Japanese writers 20'
        A portray of a writer could present an individual, who spends long hours with their MacBook, puckering their forehead over a piece of prose. It is plausible that this image propels a large number of literary adepts in Japan to submit their novels for literary prize competitions in the hope of achieving the “privileged” status of a writer. While new candidates longing for the “writer’s life” emerge continuously, those who are deemed members of the literary pantheon, struggle to belong to this world. For professional trajectories in the publishing sector are usually cobbled together with short-term projects on a freelance contract basis (Faulkner 1983). People engaged in literary writing rarely live off their art. They often carry out jobs scarcely related to literature, if at all (Heinich 2000). Consequently, the distinction of the professional standing becomes blurred at the individual level and writers find it difficult to auto-affiliate themselves with this particular vocational group. 
          Based on the qualitative and ethnographic study conducted among Japanese writers this paper addresses such issues as: How, by whom and in whose interest is the image of a professional writer socially constructed? How does it differ from the writers’ daily life? How do writers develop their careers in the context of the Japanese literary market? How do these writers build their status and gain a reputation in the “regime de singularité” (Heinich 2000) that requires originality and uniqueness? Finally, how do they operate their singularity in Japanese society, which officially praises collectivity?
        Speaker: Dr. Beata Kowalczyk (University of Tokyo)
      • 12:00 In Hope of Change: Active Audiences and their Solidarity in the Post-Charisma Era in Benin and Togo 20'
        This paper explores the characteristics of people’s hope and longing for social change in two African states with contrasting political situations after democratization. Benin and Togo experienced common democratization processes, including a National Conference, a generational change of political actors, and the proliferation of private, pro-democracy radio programs. However, Togo has retained aspects of the old system, including its hereditary leader, while Benin has experienced smooth transfers of power. Following a brief review of the recent political histories of these countries, we will investigate people’s political consciousness through interviews with active audience members who actively participate in interactive radio programs. 
          After a long political domination in Togo, the dictator Eyadema died in 2005. Immediately thereafter his son succeeded him in power and has successfully suppressed his people’s objections thus far. In Benin, the political leaders of the Democratic Turn have retired, and the generational change of leadership has been recognized as practical. Nevertheless, a cycle of corruption on the political scene, a hope for newcomers, and a scandal of the president elect has not been overcome. This raises questions such as, what did the people hope and vote for? People in changing societies place their hopes on an uncertain future rather than focusing on the tumultuous political and cultural past. Despite the people’s hope for a new future, the government advocates change in continuity and stability. The paper clarifies what kind of change the Beninese and Togolese long for and how they call for solidarity via this interactive media programs.
        Speaker: Dr. Masataka Tanaka (Otani University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Lands of the Extracto-cene: The Extractive Industries, Climate Change and Mobile Pastoralists [Commission for Nomadic Peoples]: P 29.1

      Room 2.124

      In the traditional territories of mobile pastoralists around the world, there is a form of land use that is expanding its reach with the help of new technologies and innovations in engineering, alongside a global hyper-consumerism that makes natural resources like copper, gold, natural gas and rare earths essential for the production of ‘modern’ livelihoods and technologies. The UNEP showns that global mineral extraction increased threefold in the last forty years; this trend is projected to continue in decades to come (UNEP 2016). Amongst scholars, there have been a number of studies focused on mining and mobile pastoralists, namely in Mongolia, Oman, the Arctic and Africa, but dialogue on the issues as it relates to the broader challenges faced by pastoralists remains few and far between. We aim to bring together experts working on extractive industries and mobile pastoralism globally in order to advance the scholarship in this emerging field. We examine forms of co-existence between mobile pastoralists and the extractive industries in regions where mobile animal husbandy was historically the dominate form of land use. In what ways do pastoralists adapt, resist, ignore or work with the new land users in these territories? How does the cumulative impacts of climate change and extraction impact pastoralists? How does the expansion and intensification of extraction relate with ongoing social and environmental change amongst mobile peoples? We invite papers to take a holistic approach to studying how pastoralist societies act upon the accumulation of environmental change and extractive industries in their lands.
      Conveners: Dr. Ariell Ahearn-Ligham (Oxford University), Dr. Bruce Forbes (University of Lapland)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.124
      • 11:00 Engagement with Land Use Conflicts in the North of Russia: Lessons from Anthropology 20'
        Conflicts between pastoralism and extractive industries have been documented widely in anthropology. This paper will present examples of research on such conflicts over 30 years and across the North of Russia, aiming to develop a typology of power dynamics, strategies and key scenarios of confrontation. Further, it explores the range of political and ethical stances that anthropologists have been taking – from detached description to cautious solidarity and through to Action Anthropology. In conclusion, the paper will ask to what degree and in which ways anthropological research has successfully contributed to moderating or solving conflicts on land and resource use in Russia.
        
        Speaker: Prof. Joachim Otto Habeck (Universität Hamburg)
      • 11:20 Pastoralists in Mongolia's Mining Economy: Negotiating Indigenous Identity in a New Political Space 20'
        With two of the world’s largest mining projects, Mongolia has become one of Asia’s key mineral producers in the past twenty years. Mongolian pastoralist communities living the South Gobi in the vicinity of large-scale mining operations have recently turned to transnational dispute resolution arenas to lodge their grievances and seek redress. Notably, these groups of pastoralists have sought to trigger international grievance mechanisms on the basis of being indigenous people, even though they are not recognized as such by their own government. This paper situates this contemporary mobilization of pastoralist communities in relation to large-scale mining projects within a longer history of state (de)regulation of the pastoralist economy. It reflects on the role of non-state legal norms and mechanisms in introducing new forms of legal and political subjectivity into the milieu of discourses surrounding Mongolian pastoralist identity and livelihoods. The paper reflects on the potential implications of extractive economy upon transnational identity formation, local/national political space and strategic negotiations with state and corporate power.
        
        Speaker: Dr. Jennifer Lander (De Montfort University)
      • 11:40 Best-practice overkill? the impact of state of the art impact assessments on mobile pastoralists in Siberia 20'
        All over the world best practices such as the Social Licence to Operate (SLO) or Free Prior Informed Consent have advanced to the state of the art in impact assessment practice. Recent research, also among mobile pastoralists, has resulted in a more differentiated view of what such concepts mean on the ground. In this presentation we revisit a community of mobile pastoralists in the Siberian Taiga to reflect about the usefulness of concepts that are thought to be globally accepted as best-practice and yet locally relevant for people affected by mining. Working with the Evenki of South Yakutia, we show that dialogue must be context-sensitive to the extent that it can also include actors others than mining companies and local people. Extractive industries are nowadays placed in plural governance regimes, where more than the traditional actors (people, company, and state) have stakes. In our research we reflect on how such plural governance regimes are compatible with a mobile livelihood that requires people to stay in forests while at the same time having to do best-practice paperwork. We ask whether the impact of ever more best practices may not be an alienation of people from their land due to the bureaucatisation of the best-practices process.
        Speaker: Prof. Florian Stammler (University of Lapland, Arctic Centre)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Competing environmentalist discourses and language of solidarity [IUAES Commission for Linguistic Anthropology and IUAES Commission: Anthropology and the Environment]: P 14.1

      Room 2.100

      Given the complexity of contemporary environmental crises, the need to increase environmental awareness over the last decades has led to the progressive presence of competing environmental discourses in both academy and public. Many environmental general concepts are well-known, however they are often used in a haphazard way, while ways in which environmental problems are interpreted and solutions proposed at the environment/ development interface lack consistency. A recent integrational/ecological field of ecolinguistics has a great potential for contributing to trans-disciplinary collaborations among environmental research and environmental communication as it considers a wide range of oppressed groups (e.g. including animals and current generations of humans who are suffering from pollution and resource depletion), and considers the impact of discourses on the wider systems that support life. This panel invites papers that aim to reconsider various discourses, both synchronically and diachronically through original and empirically based case studies of the language and discourse involved in the discussion of environmental and ecological issues, and interrogate how, in the media, corporate and activist circles, language is employed to argue for and propagate selected positions on the growing ecological crisis. Along with criticising the destructive impact of discourses such as advertising or economics, or detecting ambivalent discourses such as eco-tourism, sustainability or greenwash, particularly welcome are papers using positive discourse analysis of new social and environmental movements, such as those that advocate food sovereignty or solidarity economy, that might provide understanding of how change happens, for the better, across a range of environmental issues.
      Conveners: Dr. Anita Sujoldžić (Institute for Anthropological Research), Dr. Olga Orlić (Institute for Anthropological Research), Dr. Saša Poljak Istenič (Slovenia Sections Library of the Institute of Slovenian Ethnology Institute of Slovenian Ethnology)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.100
      • 11:00 Traditional ecological knowledge among Albanians in Balkans 20'
        Ethno-ecology is a sub-discipline of ethnobiology and can be defined as an interdisciplinary science concerned with analyzing and interpreting the origins, evolution and the functions of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in a certain socio-cultural system. The interplay between traditional ecological knowledge and the members of the society is known as social-ecological system. TEK are socially transmitted among generations and are responsible for the development of the cultural niche from previous generations. The cultural niche construction is related to environmental modification in order to solve the adaptive problems a society face. The ethnoecologist is interested in knowing the traditional ecological knowledge of a certain society and understanding the different variables responsible for the cultural niche construction. In addition, the evolutionary perspective is essential for the conception and analysis of the traditional ecological knowledge present in a socio-cultural system. This articles explore the studies conducted among Albanians living in Balkans and gives theoretical perspectives on how these studies should be conducted in the future.
        Speaker: Dr. Ani Bajrami (Research Center for Flora and Fauna)
      • 11:20 Document Solidarity 20'
        While the public debate was increasingly juxtaposing agricultural enterprises to environmental considerations, the bureaucrats I followed strived to facilitate cooperation and mutual recognition through the production of policy documents. Finding the right scientific knowledge, intentionally choosing illustrative picture for a policy plan, and negotiating headlines and sentence structures were among the strategies they engaged in to visibilize the points of encounter between environmental and agricultural interests with hopes of enabling further solidarity. 
          
          In contrast to common ideals -and critiques of bureaucratic practice for being emotionally detached, the bureaucrats manifested a productive use of their affects and emotions while conducting daily working tasks. They showed pride in being emotionally and bodily engaged in agriculture from having grown up on a farm, worked in the fields or by maintaining relations with farmers. Also cherishing nature and environment, the bureaucrats were saddened and angered when competing discourses on nature and environment created confusions and tensions between farmers and environmentalists. 
          
          In Norway, agriculture is seldom denominated as an industry, but rather as a sector, and often as a green sector. When recent emphasis on greenhouse gas emissions from cattle presented agriculture as comparable to fossil fuels, tensions increased. The bureaucrats would use their role to underline the consequences of climate change upon agriculture in their documents and newsletters, and at the same time give farmers recognised and payed roles in environmental policies.
        Speaker: Solfrid Nordrum (Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo)
      • 11:40 Competing Approaches to Bee Conservation and Food Security in Canada 20'
        The Canadian food system relies heavily on managed pollination services from honeybees. Statistics Canada estimates that up to $5 billion of revenue is added yearly to the agricultural sector by honeybee pollination alone. The rising prices for colony rentals reflect that the reliance on this type of system is growing, despite the increasing losses reported by beekeepers each year. The Canadian Association of Professional Apiculturalists reports average colony losses at 30% in 2018, the largest since 2009. The demands have been met by more intensive management of honeybees. Nevertheless, the increasing difficulty facing beekeepers raises concerns about the sustainability of the Canadian food system. The issue is often framed as an impending food security and honeybee crisis. Honeybees are portrayed as the main vehicles for providing these services and the main concern for tackling food-security issues. Significant efforts have been made to investigate technological solutions for tackling all honeybee sicknesses. However, this bypasses any examination of how our food system could be better organized, targeting the symptoms rather than the larger overarching problem. A counter-discourse is now emerging recognizing the role of non-managed pollinators in securing food production. The need to conserve and rehabilitate habitats for all pollinator life is now gaining recognition as a strong alternative to the over-
          simplified honeybee dependent food system. Movements in North America such as Bee City Canada and U.S.A demonstrate that food security pertains not only to healthy managed honeybees, but to the safeguarding of broader ecosystem services capacity, locally.
        Speaker: Ursula Bero (University of Ottawa)
      • 12:00 Discursive tools of animal welfare activism 20'
        Created in 1994, the French association Welfarm aims to fight for the protection of farm animals and for a better consideration of their well-being, from breeding to slaughter. Through a range of different actions (organization of information campaigns, creation of teaching materials, opening of an educational farm, etc.) the association’s objective is to inform the public at large of the practices of intensive livestock farming by highlighting its flaws and directing the consumer towards good purchasing habits. More generally, Welfarm intends to educate the consumer and encourage them towards what they call ""consom'action"" – a neologism which expresses the idea that everyone can vote through their spending habits. By consciously using purchasing power to defend certain values, consumers are able to take into account an animal’s welfare in the act of purchase. 
          
          Based on my fieldwork in the Northeartern region of France, this paper proposes to examine the various modes of engagement of the Welfarm team. What are the discursive tools mobilized to raise awareness to animal causes? What arguments and rhetorical mechanisms build their discourses? 
          
          Unlike other associations that have chosen to base their actions on moral shock and guilt, Welfarm’s discourse is utilitarian and educational. Welfarm does not aim to question the very practice of farming, but only to denounce a type of farming considered ""adrift"": intensive industrial farming. Welfarm leads us to re-categorize farming and to recognize good and bad practices. Simultaneously, Welfarm attempts to instil a notion of animal welfare and the promotion of “responsible consumption”.
        Speaker: Coralie CHAMOIS (Concordia University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Anthropology of emotions in South Asia: P 8.1

      Room 2.123

      Our panel is critically inscribed into anthropological traditions of research on emotions as socio-cultural phenomena (such as Rosaldo 1984, 1999), as well as into recent emotional-affective turn in social sciences (Navaro-Yashin 2008, Clough&Halley 2009). Most of the anthropological writings on and from South Asia detail the pivotal presence of emotions. Be it in the frame of right of the passage, ritual performances, or contemporary politics, and social transformations, emotion seems to be an abiding feature. However, there is an imperative to sketch a broader trajectory of anthropology of emotion in South Asia. This could be with reference to three key motifs: emotional vulnerability, emotional offense, and politics of emotion & emotional mobilization. This panel seeks to present narratives, findings, and arguments along the lines of key motifs in order to elucidate and develop an anthropology of emotions, crisscrossing the region of South Asia.
      Convener: Dr. MARIKO HAMAYA (Kyoto University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.132
      • 11:00 In the Name, the City has Lived: An Ethnography the ghat-names of Banaras (India) 20'
        Banaras (India) is a holy city. It is the centre of Hindu pilgrimage. The city is the fountainhead of the Hindu pilgrimage in India. It is lived city. The River Ganges flows through the city and is marked by cosmic powers. There are 84 ghats that give a half-moon like geomorphologic shape to the river. Each ghat is named. While not everything is named, things that are named have some emotional value. Place names or toponyms act as cultural mnemonics which anchor the history, memories, political struggle and practices of the landscape. The article is based on a year-long fieldwork on the ghats of Banaras. It explores how the ghat names contribute to developing an emotional history of pilgrimage about the cityscape since time immemorial. Banaras has distinct symbolic cartography hinged on the ghats along the holy river Ganges. The article looks into the names of these ghats. It elaborates on the various meaning and emotions attached to the names that have shaped the religious sentiments towards the city. It also focuses on the functions of the ghat-names in nurturing the narratives of the past. The information contained in the names encodes cultural knowledge and are highly emotive. They help in developing a common attitude towards tangible and intangible sacredness of the place. The article portrays how ghat names shape the actions, motives, sentiments, and social relations which permeate over history and cosmology in such a way that evocative and emotive geography of the city continues to narrate its saga.
        Speaker: Dr. Sweta Tiwari (Mahatma Gandhi Central University)
      • 11:20 Study of Cultural Heritage, Religious and Social Life of Religious Minorities in Pakistan 20'
        Pakistan is a diverse society with varied ethnic and religious minorities. The Country is an enormously plural country characterized by religious, sectarian and ethno-linguistic diversities. It has an overwhelming Muslim population comprises more than ninety-six percent. The constitution of Pakistan is a safeguard for the minorities which provides religious and social rights to the minorities. Two of the minorities which are not in much limelight in Pakistani society are the Bahá’ís and the Parsis. Both are said to be the religions living in the Diaspora. It appears a good case study of the religions in migration. They are living in a very small number in Pakistan but remain successful in keeping their identity. The status of the social life of these two religious minorities of Pakistan and their role in society is not very much evident.. This study aims to identify consistency and transformation in the social status of the Bahá’ís and Parsis . This study is aimed to analyze these religions in Pakistan on ethnic identity and on the institutional parameters v identified and applied by these communities themselves, i.e. the individual, community and institution. Objectives of the study are to understand the history, social status and current situation of these religious communities of Pakistan as well as their practices and socio-religious and economic aspects. Furthermore, the research is an attempt of ethnographic description of the two communities in which the researcher tried to render a ‘true to life’ picture of what people say and how they act.
        Speaker: Dr. Muhammad AYUB (DSPMU University)
      • 11:40 Marriage as Crisis Management in Indigenous Middle India. 20'
        Marriage as Crisis Management in Indigenous Middle India. The pattern of the relationship terminology, as applied by many millions of indigenous people in highland Middle India, is ordered by the omnipresent principle of reciprocal affinal exchange, as are the marriage norms and practices connecting different local descent groups of inherited affines. At the same time, the idiom of a marriage relationship as well as the inherited human affines and agnates of the principal are activated in life-cycle rituals such as those marking female maturity or those highlighting death in grand secondary funerals. Similarly, healing rituals are performed in elaborate and expensive ceremonies as „marrying the path“. I hope to demonstrate that affinity as the structural principle of the terminology is the basis of all formal social interaction. The specific ethnographic cases are taken from field research among the indigenous Gadaba and Rona of Koraput/Odisha/India, as conducted by a group of anthropologists in the course of the Orissa Research Project II (1999-2005).
        Speaker: Prof. Georg Pfeffer (Institut für Sozial- und kulturanthropologie)
      • 12:00 Making piety: an ascetic community of commensality in Haridwar, North India 20'
        The aim of this paper is to investigate how piety or devotional emotions are cultivated through sharing food, using case studies of Hindu ascetics in Haridwar, North India.
          Generally, piety is considered as the state of having or showing a belief in the transcendence, that is manifest as a pious action. However, as Mahmood (2012) argues in her study on a women’s piety movement in Egypt, belief does not always precede outward devotional practices but it can be nurtured through a set of disciplinary acts. Regarding Hindu asceticism, Van der Veer (1989) discusses how Ramanandi ascetics refine their emotions and cultivate the will to obey the guru through physical discipline. Following these perspectives, this paper explores how Hindu ascetics nurture devotional emotions, focusing on their everyday practice of sharing food.
          The author conducted fieldwork for about two and a half years in Haridwar, one of the most famous pilgrimage centres in Hindu India, situated on the western bank of the Ganges and the foothills to the Himalayas, working with religious women known as ‘lay ascetics’. Though these women live independently outside monastic premise, many of them gather at an ashram in the evening because it holds a feast for ascetics while distributing free food to beggars. This paper will argue how the ascetics who attend the feast daily cultivate devotion for the guru, which results in making a sort of community.
        Speaker: Dr. MARIKO HAMAYA (Kyoto University)
      • 12:20 Guided Emotions: Narratives of Domestic Paid Workers in India 20'
        Emotions plays an important role in everybody's life. It is believed that women are mostly vulnerable in terms of their emotional behavior. This paper attempts to understand from various narratives of the domestic paid workers in Assam on managing their emotions in the workplace to earn a livelihood in the difficult situation. 
          Mostly women domestic help work in the households to earn bread for their home. Irrespective of their emotional state, they have to perform their duties in an uninterrupted manner. Through intensive interviews, this paper argues that those who better control their emotion do better in terms of employability as domestic help.
        Speaker: Dr. Amiya Kumar Das (Tezpur University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Local medicines experiences in global context: P 3.1

      Room 2.3

      The phenomenon of local medicines has attracted great attention at international and national levels. Large numbers of people and communities are still using their own edicines to cure diseases since the prehistoric period; tradition plays a major role in this. Local medicines are not condemned in innumerable international conventions and declarations. This panel contraints research on local medicines: the various forms, the communities and cultures in which they are prevalent, the cultural and religious backgrounds, the socio economic dimensions, their medical, social implications and legal aspects, regarding efficacy, diagnostic, illness experiences, promotion of health strategies and power relations. The analysis resulting from these approaches can be meaningful in many ways and open new avenues to explore local medicines worldwide.
      Conveners: Dr. Raktim Patar (Gargaon College), Dr. Hiroshi Sugimoto (Niigata University of Health and Welfare)
      • 11:00 Traditional Health Care System of the Tiwa of North East India 20'
        It is well known that traditional health care practices are still relevant and are followed by communities across the countries. Traditional medicine describes a group of health care practices and products with a long history of use. It frequently refers to medical knowledge developed by indigenous cultures that incorporate plant, animal and mineral based medicine, spiritual therapies and manual techniques designed to treat illness. The Tiwa are an indigenous tribe in the North Eastern part of India has been practising the traditional health care system to cure different illnesses since time immemorial. Believe in traditional medicine have not only influenced their individual life but also have a significant impact on their society and culture. This paper discusses the various facets of the Tiwa traditional health care system and its social and cultural implications.
        Speaker: Dr. Raktim Patar (Gargaon College)
      • 11:20 The value of placebo medicine in the treatment of homeopathy in India 20'
        Homeopathy was originally invented in Germany in the 18th century and has been practiced as equal to the traditional local medicines in India for more than 100 years. The Indian government established the Ministry of AYUSH in 2014 to ensure the optimal development and propagation in Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy. Homeopathy is the only one medicine from other countries. In the practice of homeopathy in India, the placebo medicine is sometimes prescribed in the treatment. This paper examines how the use of placebo medicine is prescribed and how it is effective in the treatment of homeopathy. Based on the research of homeopathy in Kolkata in 2018, the conceptions of placebo and practices are explored from the cultural, social implications and legal aspects.
        Speaker: Dr. Yuri Nonami (Otemae University)
      • 11:40 Symbolical Imaginary of Plants and Charms in Traditional Romanian Medicine 20'
        The paper tries to present surviving elements of a local traditional medicine as it got transmitted to nowadays in certain regions of Romania. The medicinal herbs, oral charms are meant to heal diseases – physical or psychic pains. Mother Mary, saints or beings specific to popular culture are invoked to help the person in pain, in order to heal its diseases. A symbolical structure of the human body can be observed in the text of the charms, in the description of the healing process, in the presentation of healing agents, in the props of the charmer (gestures, medicinal herbs, certain objects used to practice the charms – knives, scissors, lead, matches, coal, broom, white, black or red thread, water etc.). The charm ends with the presentation of the healed body as it was created by God, a certain perfection of the body as the effect of the magic ritual although the healing is expected from God. Space and time have certain qualities in the performed charms. The charms open with the description of the person in pain before getting sick, when he or she was healthy, they decided to make a trip on a pure road, but on the crossroad they met certain grotesque figures (vampire, werewolf, “iele” – Romanian beings specific to popular culture, that circulate into the air, dance, and burn the grass when they dance, and upset human mind; they have many names – “The Saints”, “The Beautiful”, “the Windy Ones” because they appear as a wind).
        Speaker: Gabriela Boangiu (Institute for Socio Human Researches "C.S. Nicolaescu-Plopsor", of the Romanian Academy)
      • 12:00 Performance activities of individuals with a mental illness in Japan 20'
        This study aimed to examine the performance activities in which individuals with a mental illness participate in Japan, and to consider interaction with conventional activities as self-help group and discourse of society. The most common activities were poetry reading in clubs. Sometimes they participated in dramatic performances. The contents of poems included the performer’s experience of the illness, their opinion of the society, and a message for others with the illness. Some performance groups and members had weak connections with other performers, audiences, and related individuals. Further, we-consciousness was developed through participation in the performance, as observed in the poem “Nakama (peer)”presented by a performer with alcohol addiction. Additionally, by facing their experiences and emotions through performance, the participants’ identity was constructed. The participant observation data revealed that these activities did not merely challenge or support social constructs, but they integrated the Western medicine discourse and social norms. Thus, hybridization of participants’ philosophy and identity occurred through such performances. These findings suggest that performance activities not only improve peer interactions or social participation, but they also facilitate the construction of the participants’ identity and we-consciousness. In the mental health domain, some interesting philosophies or strategies such as harm reduction and open dialogue are appearing. These philosophies may mutually interact with performance activities. In future, it is necessary to clarify how performance activities, contents of poems, consciousness, philosophies, and changes in social action and identity construction are affected by the philosophy of harm reduction or open dialogue.
        Speaker: Dr. Hiroshi Sugimoto (Niigata University of Health and Welfare)
      • 12:20 Quilombolas therapeutic agencying: The flow of knowledge, the making of people and heritage 20'
        This paper addresses the issue of therapeutic agencying in quilombola communities in the State of Bahia, which are consisted of descendants of African peoples brought to Brazil as slaves. In contrast to the approaches that sets apart traditional knowledge based on beliefs (religious, ethnic, alternative) and biomedicine into ""systems"", we consider that the territorialized practices and knowledges in the ways of living of these populations have borders, permeabilities and resignifications very different from those that are usually considered as therapeutic, religious or cultural. From this point of view, knowledge and techniques are considered as therapeutic (recognized for their intrinsic properties) and it can simultaneously emanate from other sources of power (faith, belief in gods, saints, orixás, the plants or the forest etc.).
          Throughout the text we will present three questions. The first one refers to the ways in which knowledge is learned and circulated in health care, leading to the problematization of the concept of ""therapeutic specialists"" to qualify the social distribution of this knowledge that is made beyond those traditionally recognized as pray healers. In this case, both practices and knowledge are widely disseminated in the territories by ""therapeutic practitioners,"" who identify themselves in a variety of ways. The second question suggests that the dissemination of knowledge unfolds in the care and creation of ""continued people"", combining processes of individuation and relationalities. The last question addresses the contemporary crossover of these practices and knowledges into the field of culture, in the form of tradition and patrimonialisation.
        Speaker: Dr. Fátima Tavares (Federal University of Bahia)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Beyond-human solidarities. Perceptions, ontologies and interactions with Earth beings: P 11.1

      Room 3.20

      Beyond-human interactions are given a growing interest in anthropology today. While the so-called “ontological turn” has initiated a broad theoretical debate, renovated discourses and practices about “(re)connecting” with “Earth beings” (Cadena 2015) are also emerging, especially in the Western world. In order to ground the discussion on empirical evidences, this panel welcomes contributions that are aiming to explore solidaritiesbeyond humans and within a plurality of worlds, deriving from diverse epistemological and ontological foundations. A large range of research can feed the reflexion. For instance, research based on phenomenological and sensorial approaches studying modes of relation such as alternative agricultures or composting can refresh ontological discussions. Those can remain sometimes too abstract and encompassing to overcome the schemes they ambition to supersede. Ritual innovation including non-human beings within alternative spiritualities and deep ecological movements is another relevant field of investigation. Also, ethnographical studies around the global movement for the rights of nature reveal the attempt to include new subjects in the realm of law, this “other world” (Hermitte 1999). Contributions that address such cosmopolitics of beyond-human solidarities, through ontological conflicts/frictions (Blaser 2013 ; Landivar & Ramilien 2015, 2017), are especially welcomed.
      Conveners: Dr. Jean Chamel (IHAR, Université de Lausanne), Ms. Bertrande Galfré (LESC, Université Paris Nanterre)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.20
      • 11:00 Slime solutions to social problems: encounters with Physarum Polycephalum 20'
        In the face of looming ecological, social and climate crises, as the familiar categories of beings are becoming endangered or extinct and the global eco-political system is heading towards catastrophe, increasingly, hope is found at the edges of the familiar world and in the pockets of the dominant reality. Organisms that exist on its fringes, be they mushrooms, slime molds or the rare bacteria that produce plastic-breaking enzymes, are expected to point a way out of the current crisis.
          One of such organisms is Physarum Polycephalum, a billion-year-old slime mold that possess characteristics of both fungi and animals. It’s plasmodium is a single cell that contains millions of nuclei and moves in search for food leaving traces that serve as a memory device. Its body contains the map of its past movement and shelters it can return to. It has been used in computer programming and communication systems modeling (Adamatzky 2010), finding solutions to social problems (Plasmodium Symposium at Hampshire College, 2017), and in research on the origins of consciousness, among others.
          Recent debates in anthropology (Holbraad & Pedersen 2017, Pina-Cabral 2017) have brought to the fore the concept of the world, and the fact that it remains under-theorized. This paper is an attempt to use the insights gained from encounters with Physarum Plycehalum to reflect on the anthropological concept of the world. What is “world” from the slime mold’s perspective and what can it bring into anthropological theory?
        Speaker: Dr. Maria Debinska (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences City: Warsaw Country: Poland)
      • 11:20 Earth Beings beyond spirituality. Ethnographic notes on a non human entity that is material, artificial and opaque in an extractivist context (Peruvian Andes) 20'
        Leaving open the possibility of a radical alterity and multiplicity of an environment with whom humans relate in terms that exceed modern worldings, I will try to describe Cañaris’ cosmopolitical practices and conceptions relating to the construction, uses, inhabiting and renovation of a building made with ancient techniques in one of its most important towns. The non-human entity that emerge from this ontogenic exploration is called Iglisya. It is a building of thatched roof and sun dried bricks that is simultaneously less “indigenous” and more “artificial” (and less spiritual and more material, and less mediatised and more invisible) than what has been usually the focus of Amerindian studies (i.e., in the case of the narratives around Andean earth beings such as Pachamama or Apus, and the associated discourses about the buen vivir).
         
        I argue that since its clandestine construction by “indios” of the eighteenth century, this temple represented the land and constituted it. In fact, this Iglisya is not distinguishable from the relationship between the Cañarenses and their land, and this relationship is conceived and made in analogy to that one between parents and children.
         
        In sum, the land is solidariously treated by Cañarenses as their child, in contrast to those entities usually invoked by publicised indigenous movements and protests, with parent-like figures. Finally, I consider the material aspect of a relationship with a more-than-human entity that constitutes the land and provides Cañarenses with a cosmopolitical device with which an they become able to contend an increasingly threatening ruination context.
        Speaker: Dr. Juan Javier Rivera Andía (Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos)
      • 11:40 Rights of Nature Networks in Europe: Rituality, Ecospirituality and Ontologies 20'
        The idea of granting specific rights to nature and natural entities is increasing worldwide since the inclusion of such rights in the Ecuadorian constitution of 2008. Recently, new laws and legal decisions have provided rivers with rights in New Zealand, India and Columbia, with significant media coverage.
          
          The global networks that promote these rights attract less attention but are very active. They draw inspiration from the movement for the rights of indigenous people, especially to perform rituals, and claim a spiritual dimension in their engagement.
          
          Based on the ethnography of the European ramifications of these networks, this paper will focus on the rituality that they develop to perform a communion with natural entities, more specifically rivers (such as « despacho » ceremonies inspired by the Peruvian Q’eros in England) and water (« water ceremony » within United Nations premises in Geneva). Using the relational approach to ritual developed by Michael Houseman, it will address the issues of ritual innovation, performativity and legitimacy.
          
          Finally, this paper will also examine how these networks defend, through law arguments, an ecocentric worldview and a holistic and monistic ecospirituality that is related to alternative spiritualities with ontological implications.
        Speaker: Dr. Jean Chamel (IHAR, Université de Lausanne)
      • 12:00 Biodynamic composting: linking humans and earth beings through the ritualization of a peasant practice 20'
        This study takes place in the Comminges region in the South of France and focuses on a peasant network involved in Biodynamic Agriculture. Composting is a main practice for this alternative way of farming and echoes Donna Haraway’s sentence: “We are all compost” (Haraway, 2015).
          In 1924 Rudolf Steiner founded the Biodynamic Agriculture at the very beginning of the organic movement in Europe and inspired by his esoteric current called Anthroposophy. The Biodynamic Agriculture’s spiritual origins have practical consequences for it is nether simply about improving the productivity of the farm but is rather an agriculture of care, aiming to reach a symbiotic welfare for the individual and his environment through a process of ritualization of practices. The biodynamic compost is paradigmatic of this process.
          The biodynamic farming is related to an ideal: the agricultural organism. In hence, the farm is conceived as a “whole” with each element specifically considered. The ethnography of composting enlightens the biodynamic holistic approach and its analogical way of thinking, at the heart of the biodynamic practices. The ritualization of this common peasant practice engages the actors in a whole network of relationships which involves humans as much as other earth beings. Using a relational approach to ritual (Houseman, 2012), following each step leading to the biodynamic compost, we will see how links are built and maintained between the actors engaged in the welfare of the agricultural organism. Finally, this compost becomes itself a new earth being condensing all links conjured during its manufacture.
        Speaker: Bertrande Galfré (LESC, Université Paris-Nanterre)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Constructing Solidarities through Historical Traces: P 16.1

      Room 3.134

      Solidarity is seen as a concept that bridges “diverse modes of practice, forms of sociality and mechanisms of envisioning future prospects for people's lives” (Rakopoulos 2016). This panel explores the complex relationships between historical traces and solidarities. Drawing from a range of traces including landscapes, material culture and bodies, we ask what kind of solidarities are afforded or hindered by the concept of trace. We see traces as knots of history with an ambiguous auratic presence, located between forgetting and memory, repression and amplification, metonymy and forgetting (Napolitano 2015). What kind of solidarities are made possible by the existence of traces? How productive are traces in enabling diverse practices of solidarity? What forms of sociality are bridged by traces and which ones are torn apart? How are forms of solidarity produced through encounters with trace? In what ways, are these “intimate” or kinship solidarities, or perhaps ones aligned to the nation state (Herzfeld 2016)? What are the points of tension or discord generated by particular solidarities? How are traces experienced and performed as part of future-making exercises? The panel invites speakers with a range of ethnographic material, including anthropologies of history, state, religion as well as museum and material culture. References: Herzfeld, M. (2016). The Intimate Solidarities of Religion in the City. History and Anthropology, 27(3), 265-272. Napolitano, V. (2015). Anthropology and traces. Anthropological Theory, 15(1), 47-67. Rakopoulos, T. (2016). Solidarity: the egalitarian tensions of a bridge‐concept. Social Anthropology, 24(2), 142-151.
      Conveners: Dr. Magdalena Buchczyk (Humboldt University), Dr. Zahira Aragüete-Toribio (University of Geneva), Dr. Aimee Joyce (University of St Andrews)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.134
      • 11:00 "The Materiality of Liberty: Tracing the Material Culture of the Improved Order of Red Men" 20'
        The Improved Order of Red Men is a U.S. fraternal society descendant of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty, originating in the U.S. just before the American Revolution. The Sons and Daughters of Liberty were made famous in the mid 18th century when they dressed up as Mohawk Indians and dumped British tea from importing ships overboard to protest British rule and to assert the U.S. as sovereign. This paper will analyse the historical traces of I.O.R.M. material culture. Traces of objects, ritual, and text found in archives indicate a type of U.S. settler semiotic that was developed throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This settler materiality aided in the creation of vast temporal connections between the early sons and daughters of liberty and more contemporary members of the I.O.R.M. What solidified these connections was a materiality that signified liberty and freedom, woven throughout the entire corpus of I.O.R.M. material culture, mirroring the semiology of the United States. This paper will argue that U.S. semiology privileges ideas of freedom, liberty, and unity and these ideals are imbued within objects and symbols such as the American bald eagle and the Plains feathered headdress. Additionally, by supplanting American Indian materiality with that of a settler imaginary the I.O.R.M. sewed a praxis of settler colonial erasure in the iconography of Americana. This paper is based on four months of ethnographic and archival field work conducted in several archives throughout the continental U.S. and with current members of the order.
        Speaker: Sonja Dobroski (St. Andrews)
      • 11:20 When myth became a history. How genesis of the Kashubian embroidery creates and destroys a solidarity. 20'
        Kashubian embroidery is one of the most important signs of the contemporary Kashubian identity. Its patterns are constantly reproducing in form of so called Kashubian patterns and as such exists like a marketing product.
          It is also invented tradition (Hobsbawm, Ranger 2008) built up on a myth that refers to the nuns from the XIII century Norbertanian Monastery in Żukowo who created Kashubian embroidery and passed it to the local inhabitants. This myth is crucial for creating solidarity within and between groups as a Kashubian, embroiderers, tourists, representatives of local governments, museums, entrepreneurs and other agents.
          In my speech I will examine how myth of Kashubian embroidery genesis creates a solidarity among groups mentioned above and how people are sustaining it; what forms of solidarity are based on that myth; what are the purposes of maintaining the solidarity; what differs the myth and historical truth of the Kashubian embroidery; what and who threatens solidarity based on myth and how people counteract to them. 
          Presented conclusions are results of research that I have been conducting from 2017 as a part of my PhD thesis. Methods used for this work includes ethnographical field research and critical analysis of the literature, archives and digital materials.
        Speaker: Kamila Dombrowska (Museum - Teodora and Izydor Gulgowski Kashubian Ethnographic Park in Wdzydze Kiszewskie / University of Gdańsk)
      • 11:40 Non-European collections from the time of the Non-Aligned Movement in Slovenia: solidarity for today's museum practice 20'
        The Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) functioned as a third way between the two blocs, aiming to creatively contribute to the existing world order. It advocated for peaceful coexistence, disarmament, territorial integrity, and supported anti-colonial struggles. Different collaborations and exchanges were established between non-aligned countries in the field of economy, business, education and culture. Yugoslavia as one of the founders of the NAM participated in those processes which significantly contributed to acquiring new museum collections from other continents.
          In this presentation, I will focus on museological practices of collecting non-European collections in Slovenia in the period between 1960 and 1990, when Slovenia was one of the six republics of former Yugoslavia. The new Museum for non-European cultures was established in 1964, and was filled with collections from all over the world. The museum used different ways to acquire collections, for instance the museum curators did fieldwork in several African countries, collaborated with amateur collectors, people of different profiles and interests, as well as with foreign students who donated or sold the objects to the museum. In addition, objects came by artists’ donations, and donations from the Presidency of Yugoslavia. Analyzing the collecting policy in the newly established Museum for non-European cultures, I will try to rethink the possible use of the NAM principle of solidarity in contemporary museum activities. The most important question is, if new strategies and visions of collecting those collections can be developed on the basis of specific anti-colonial disposition and notion of solidarity of the time.
        Speaker: Tina Palaic (Faculty of Arts)
      • 12:00 Why exhume Franco’s body? The necropolitics of modern Spain 20'
        In June 2018, when The Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) came to power, it decided to exhume Franco’s body. This was a symbolic action against the dictatorship and in favour of the historical memory of the Republicans who died during the Spanish civil war. We can look for the foundations of such symbolism in the history and in a social phenomenon of exhumationists’ movement that emerged in Spain in 2000. Part of Spanish society became concentrated on actions related to the search for mass graves and proper burials for the victims, trying to produce a deep review of the country’s historical memory and policy. The exhumed bodies are being recognised as a break in long-term repression of the regime and on-going necroviolence. 
          The sudden public, political and media interest in finding relatives' remains led to an increased demand for experts able to perform disinterments. It initiated an emergence of what I call an “exhumational business” that for many archaeologists was an opportunity to get out of the financial crisis that began in Spain in 2008. With time, the social phenomenon has also become an arena of political identification and a popular point in the programmes of left-wing parties.
          Here, I am looking to illustrate the political and social reasons to exhume Franco’s body, together with the involved symbolism. As at February 2019, the body remains unexhumed, waiting for a resolution of a conflict between the church, the politicians and Franco’s family, which I also hope to characterise.
        Speaker: Alexandra Staniewska (Adam Mickiewicz University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Critiques of Political Economy and Alternative Global Futures: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual Ecology: P 17.1

      Room 3.135

      The panel focuses the following main points: -Genealogies of Political Economy as a Critical Perspective: A Critical History and Struggle for Alternative Futures -Limits and Possibilities of Critiques of Political Economy: From Marx to Picketty -Critique of Political Economy and the Calling of Ecology: Limits of Production, Consumption and Paths of Biological and Cultural Regenereration -With and Beyond Critiques of Political Economy: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual Ecology -Dimensions of Moral Economy: From Aristotle to Sahlins (Marshall Sahlins, The Stone Age Economics), Mauss (Marcel Mauss, Gift), Gandhi and Kumarappa -Moral Sociology -Spiritual Ecology
      Conveners: Dr. Ananta Kumar Giri (Madras Institute of Development Studies), Dr. Abdulkadir Osman Farah (Aalborg University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.135
      • 11:00 Critique of Political Economy Includes Anthropology about Morality within Culture(s) 20'
        The desirable futures of humanity should not be determined solely or even mainly by what is often called “the market”. What follows immediately is a statement of the first component of this paper. (1) What exactly is meant by global markets is notably unclear, or if clarified, unacceptable. “The market” is flawed if used as the main guide for social practices insofar as they are aimed at creating a desirable future for humanity. Recent social science has sometimes recognized the need for integrated interpretation and change of real-world politics and the economy. As part of this, the phrase “political economy” has been invoked in ways old and new. What follows immediately is a statement of the second component of this paper. (2) This paper argues that anthropologically sophisticated work, such as Arjun Appadurai’s work on “the future as cultural fact”, can and should combine political economy with culturally focused research and interventions in creating the future. What follows immediately is a statement of the third component of this paper. (3) In the process of combining political economy and culturally focused work, a central feature must be the critique and construction of a morality adequate to deal with the challenges of globalization, including problems about global markets. Anthropology can and must have a central role in integrating the interdisciplinary empirical and normative work necessary for meeting the current and future needs of humanity.
        Speaker: Dr. Edward Sankowski (University of Oklahoma)
      • 11:20 Moral dimensions of economic practices in Daghestan, North Caucasus 20'
        In the North Caucasus Salafi-oriented Muslims, portrayed as opponents of the secular state and a threat to the state's security are at the same time, the most avid opponents of corruption. Yet, they are not able to avoid it when running a business or working on a state-paid position. In my paper I explore moral dimensions of economic life in the multi-ethnic capital of Daghestan, Makhachkala. I take a closer look at the narratives and practices of Daghestani Muslims working for the state or running a business. I ask how different moralities interact or compete in the organization of social life with corruption as an inherent part of it? How Islam shapes economic behavior and its moral dimensions? I argue that by applying Islamic framing to their economic activities Salafi-oriented Muslims aim to find a moral alternative to the state-system they find “immoral” and “corrupt”. Unexpectedly, however, instead of (as could be expected) escaping the market-society-script scheme, the reinforce it. In my analysis I employ the concept of moral economy (Sayer 2015, Whythe & Wiegratz 2016).
        Speaker: Dr. Iwona Kaliszewska (University of Warsaw)
      • 11:40 The Rearrangement of Social Relationships Mediated by the Marketization of Buffalo Meat :A Case Study from Caste-Ordained Meat Sellers in Nepal 20'
        This study examines the process of marketization of buffalo meat and how it leads the rearrangement of social relationships especially on caste society in Kathmandu, Nepal.
          Buffalo sacrifice had played an essential role in rituals of Newar, who is indigenous group of Kathmandu, and the distribution system of buffalo meat after sacrificing worships had been deeply embedded within their caste society.
          In 2008, Nepal had declared a shift from Hindu kingdom to secular democratic republic. Along with such political and religious transition, economic shift is relevant by the expansion of global market. In 2016, the government of Nepal announced ban of buffalo slaughter within Kathmandu Valley since it seems “pre-modern” and “unhygienic”. The meat distributers who slaughter buffaloes in traditional way within their residential area are expected to convert to be workers in modern slaughterhouse outside of the Kathmandu Valley.
          I will focus how meat distributer can deal with this shift by studying the struggles of the Khadgi caste who has historically engaged in both animal sacrifice and selling meat as their caste-ordained role in Newar society. In 2016, Khadgi people established their company to distribute the “healthy and hygienic meat” under the instruction of the government. In the meat market, Khaḍgi negotiates beyond their caste and ethnicity, especially with Muslim community who plays leading role in the global meat market. On the other hand, Khaḍgi keeps their caste based traditional role. Thus, I will show how Khadgi rearranges the social relationships by articulating caste-based roles and market mediated jobs.
        Speaker: Dr. Kanako Nakagawa (Otemon Gakuin University)
      • 12:00 Political economy of the university in the context of changes in the law on higher education in Poland 20'
        The university is an institution serving the society. Its purpose is to create new knowledge (research activity) and its transfer (didactic activity). These are processes developed as a result of many years of culture, educated in academic centers, having a deep and permanent character. We are now witnessing another change that is the result of globalization processes - universities become centers creating entrepreneurial behavior and are also trying to act in this spirit. But this approach also entails other issues. The challenges brought by the 21st century and the dynamically developing market of educational services - now highly competitive - allow one to assume that only institutions that are open to change will survive. Others will disappear or be absorbed by emerging leaders. The new law on higher education and science introduced in Poland is subject to criticism by various environments (especially the humanities) by increasing the measurability of research and teaching effects. The widespread punishment and graphs and financing algorithms of universities do not serve scientists in a truly scientific work.
        Speaker: Joanna Tomaszewska (Uniwersytet Wrocławski)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Cultural Identity and Technological Privacy: P 18.1

      Room 2.99

      The cost/benefit analysis of free to use educational technology almost always results in EdTech adoption, since the benefits often come at no financial cost to the school or learner. However, privacy advocates have pointed out that users still “pay” for free EdTech programs; not with money, but with their information. This consideration for student and teacher data privacy has generated various policy changes and updates to student privacy laws across several countries. However, users in those same countries might see no issue with providing personal data in exchange for valuable programs, and not all countries have deemed such an exchange controversial. It is clear that cultural identity may influence perceptions and policies regarding student data privacy. Identity is an important idea in many disciplines. Anthropology, education, sociology, technology and other fields have highlighted national identities, ethnological identities, ethnic identities, cultural identities, social identities and self-identities. The current cross-culture and interdisciplinary identity research has demonstrated an interdisciplinary trend. Our panel discussion will focus on critical themes based on current cross culture and interdisciplinary identity research. The panel will discuss the relationship between identities and technology. Through the study of the relationship between these factors, we can explore the impacts and influences of technology on the identity. Both micro-qualitative research and macro-quantitative research findings will be discussed. Our panel will use the two critical themes mentioned above to generate intriguing conversations surrounding these issues. We are looking forward to new understandings of identity and technology privacy.
      Conveners: Ms. Amanda Potasznik (University of Massachusetts), Dr. Wenfan Yan (Beijing Normal University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.99
      • 11:00 Coping with Dual-nationality Identity:A Case Study From China from Perspective of Technology 20'
        Yunnan is one of the provinces in China with most minority nationalities. Located in southwestern borders, Yunnan province has a comprehensive context in terms of agriculture, poverty and ethnic minorities.
          
          Resulting from the standardized nationality identification by government, some minority nationalities are recognized as a certain nationality different from their history such as “Pumi” people lived in Yunan being divided into “Naxi” and “Tibetan” nationality. However, they believe themselves belonging to “Pumi” according to their culture, customs and faith. Here comes an interesting issue of dual-nationality identity——one from history and one from politics, or the past-nationality and the current-nationality, and how they recognize their own ethnic belonging and deal with the conflicts within it deserves deep exploration. 
          
          Through pilot investigation, children live in a family with old people like grandparents full of ethnic legends or tales have better recognition of their historical nationality identity. But there’ s also an awkward fact that this way of transmitting ethnic knowledge and memories is low-efficient and hardly long-lasting. Therefore, inevitable technologies need to be introduced to improve the current situation.
          
          Based on our preliminary assumption, embodiment of traditional culture like oral-history or multi-media broadcasting by their religion leader could be one of an effective ways to help people form their nationality identity even sometimes there exist some fierce and contradictory dilemmas between their political nationality and historical nationality. Follow-up research should be conducted through mixed research methods including deep interview and questionnaire on “Pumi” people about their real perception and experience of identity.
        Speaker: Dr. Wei WU (Yunnan Normal University(China))
      • 11:20 Ritual Expression and Privacy Protection in Social Media of Female College Students - 20 Cases From China 20'
        Female college students are active users of social media in China. They frequently share a large amount of their daily activity with others in the form of picture, text, and video, many of these posts include significant amounts of personal private information . The effect of this action is two-sided: realizing instant spread and communication of information can affect the young women from a social standpoint, and embracing such technology so openly can lead to potential security problems. In this paper, 20 female college students with active WeChat in China were selected as the cases and Lasswell's ""5W"" Model was used as the analytical framework. Using qualitative research methods, the students were interviewed in a semi-structured manner. Other data comes from all the information they have posted on ‘WeChat Discover’ in the past three years, then uses Nvivo to process these data. It is found that this public information, different from the trivial and specific daily life, is obviously highly concentrated and abstract, but it is also the symbolic embodiment of the women’s reality and imagination of daily life, and the whole set of symbolic activities formed from this is a kind of personal ritual expression and self-identity. Security factors for this ritual include: personal address, telephone number,content of job, family members, location, schedule, hobbies , wealth and other information that should not be disclosed. The small sample size is the limitation of this study, and the mixed method of more cases and statistical data is worthy of future study.
        
        Speaker: Dr. Lil Wang (College of Educational Science, Harbin Normal University)
      • 11:40 Cultural Identity And Technological Privacy 20'
        Cultural identity is an intercultural process may be understood as a set of customs,institutions, ideas,ideals and value created and developed throughout history,forming a continual entity within a general and cultural continuum usually associated with one nation,living in particular state or within a larger cultural community.Privacy remains both contentious and ever more pertinent in contemporary society.Yet it persists as an ill define terms,not only within specific field but in its various uses and implication between and across technical,legal and political contexts.This article offers a new critical review of the cultural identity crises by the technology. Culture is all about the ancient practices of traditional pattern.Technology is latest phenomena which provoke the cultural identity and privacy of human beings in global era.Asian society affected with this technological tools and techniques.
          Technology and privacy are two intertwined nations that must be jointly analyzed and faced. Technology is a social practice that embodies the capacity of societies to transform themselves by creating the possibility to generate and manipulate not only physical objects, but also symbols, cultural forms and social relations. In turn, privacy describes a vital and complex aspect of these social relations. Thus technology influences people’s understanding of privacy, and people’s understanding of privacy is a key factor in defining the direction of technological development.
        Speaker: Ashok Oraon (Ranchi University)
      • 12:00 Reflections of Modernization of Earlychildhood Education of Ethnic Minorities Regions in Southwest China in the Context of 20'
        These days, the CPC Central Committee and the State Council of China released two critical policy centering around strategic plans of promoting educational modernization in recent years as well as in the mid and long term till 2035. Promoting universal public system of early childhood education for all childroon, especially low-income children in ethnic minorities and west China, equally and with high quality is part of the primary goal of educational modernization. In the era of "internet +", technology provided necessary and advanced support in bringing and integrating quality resources from the urban centers into the indegeneous ethnic minority communities in terms of hardware building as well as in terms of software education package resources. However, the tension between modern technogy based resources and the traditional ethnic cultural resources is enlarging and creating challenges for children to identify who they are and who they are going to be. This paper adopts in-depth interviews, observations and life stories to narrate and disclose the life stories, tensions, perceptions, and reactions of randomly selected three children of 6 from an ethnic minority region of poverty. Based on anlaysis of multi types of qualitative data, this paper amis to reflect the critical values of technogy and educational modernization strategy upon the development of early childhood education, individual children development as well as on the reservation of cultural identity and heritage.
        Speaker: Dr. YUMEI HAN (Southwest University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Clinical interpretations and ordinary lives: Stories from psychiatric anthropology: P 13.1

      Room 2.20

      This panel is an immersion in sensitive ethnographies that document contemporary engagements with mental health services and systems, psychiatric discourses, and therapeutic practices around the world. Writing about Iran, Orkideh Behrouzan (2016) draws attention to how the normalization of the psychiatric vernacular has engendered new ways of knowing, interpreting, and perceiving oneself and others in the world. A growing literature shows how nuanced ethnographies can illuminate local ‘ecologies of suffering’ (Jadhav et al, 2015:13) that can be used to inform and question constructions of mental health as global (Jain and Orr, 2016). Engaging with this, the panel will focus on specific ways that the psychotherapeutic language and practice penetrate the everyday life of people grappling not only with mental distress but also with the external ambiguities of how mental health and its ‘treatments’ are understood in their, and others’, societies. We aim to foreground the voices of variously situated actors who (struggle to) make sense of different mental states (their own and those experienced by others) against a landscape where mental health is positioned as global. We are interested in the stories of those who are engaged in ‘doing’ mental health through the ‘tinkering’ of acts of care (Moser, Mol 2010) – in clinics, homes, community centres, schools, centres for elderly people , primary care settings, and more. Focus is on how mental health is ‘done’ and what diagnostic categories ‘do’ (Mills and Hilberg, in press) in diverse sites around the world.
      Conveners: Dr. Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk (University of Warsaw), Dr. China Mills (University of Sheffield/City University London)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.20
      • 11:00 ‘Internal Family Systems’ (IFS) as emergent therapy in the UK 20'
        Autoimmune diseases and psychological ‘wounds’ are often characterized as a battle against oneself: autoimmunity as the reduction of one’s immune system’s capacity to distinguish between one’s own cells and foreign ones, while in many ways psychological wounds are seen as implying self-sabotage. The ‘disease’ is normally seen as a part of the person (its immune system and/or a neurosis) and, hence, it is classified as ‘chronic’ by established biomedicine and psychology. However, in opposition to conventional approaches, emerging immunostimulant therapies, such as Vitamin D3 Therapy and the Complex of Essential Amino Acids, and the Internal Family Systems Therapy (IFS) see these parts of the person as the key to tackle their suffering and seek to mobilize them as to improve one’s health. That seems to provoke significant resonances in society. Besides, IFS-training centres have been grounded outside the US. In 2013, a randomized controlled study with 79 patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggested that IFS based intervention helped patients to diminish pain and depression. Given its apparently increasing acceptance, how does IFS affect conventional treatments? Here I report on the use of IFS in the UK as part of my broader anthropological study on the circulation and regulation of innovative therapies to treat autoimmunity. My presentation is based on unstructured interviews conducted between Mid-December 2018 and Mid-February 2019 with IFS-practitioners in England. Analytically, I discuss my findings in light of studies that, in recent decades, have pointed out causal relations between emotional stress during childhood, psychological wounds and autoimmunity.
        Speaker: Dr. Márcio Vilar (University of Sussex)
      • 11:20 ‘Work stress’, ‘adaptation’ and accountability: an ethnographic account on psychiatric discourses and workers experiences with work-related mental illness in Santiago of Chile. 20'
        Mental illnesses and work-related mental health are becoming a social issue in contemporary Chile. Currently, there has been an exponential increase of psychiatric medical leave in the country and they are considered to be the main cause of work absenteeism. In a context where “common” and “occupational” health are financially and medically separated in two different healthcare systems, in this paper I reflect on the local psychiatric discourses and workers’ experiences on work-related mental illnesses and negotiations over accountability of distress. Especially, I focus on the understandings and claims over “occupational” psychiatric diseases.
          By means of ethnographic research in Santiago of Chile with medical practitioners and with 20 low and middle-income workers taking psychiatric medical leave (through the “occupational” healthcare system), in this paper I focus on describing the rise of the psychiatric concepts such as ‘stress’ and ‘adaptation disorder’ as well as workers’ journeys through insurances’ bureaucratic barriers and conflictive relationships with the workplace and healthcare systems.
          I reflect upon how despite the dominant view that accentuates the notion of workers’ psychological or biological predisposition to mental illness, there is still a growing sense of making justice, legitimacy and social critique that grows out from Chilean workers’ experiences and experts discourses. Moreover, I argue that the medical processes and psychiatric language of mental illnesses play key roles in processes that both deny and give moral value to workers’ conduct, and in the possible emergence of agency and political subjectivities.
        Speaker: Sofia Bowen (King's College London)
      • 11:40 Psychopharmaceutical users in Uruguay: between biological, psychological and popular interpretations of illness and recovery. An ethnographic approach. 20'
        This paper analyzes how antidepressants and benzodiazepines users in Uruguay understand and experience psychopharmaceutical treatments and their connections with mental distress and everyday lives. Antidepressants and benzodiazepines are the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs by psychiatrists, general practitioners and family doctors in the country. Even though there are no reliable psychopharmaceuticals consumption data for the whole country, it has been pointed out by many medical scholars in the country that these two types of drugs are highly used by the general population and are easily available. We carried out two research projects in the public health service in Montevideo: one with benzodiazepines users from 2014-2016 and one ethnography research in 2018 focused on antidepressants circulation in the clinical practice. The narratives of antidepressants and benzodiazepines users show that they make sense of the psychopharmaceutical treatments by resorting to everyday metaphors of help, friendship, food, at the same time they resort to a set of biological, neurochemical and psychological metaphors to make sense of how these medicines work. Their experience of mental distress then becomes a disputed field by psy-disciplines inspired discourses and popular discourses on mental suffering, experiences becoming ill and of recovery. The results show that consumers are not passive victims of medicalizacion and pharmaceuticalizaton processes, but active actors with their own interests and thus their voices have to be taken into account to comprehend this complex phenomena.
        Speaker: Santiago Navarro (Universidad de la República)
      • 12:00 Facing the unknown: negotiating the medicalization of juvenile delinquency in France 20'
        Drawing from a year-long ethnographic immersion in the services of the French Juvenile Judicial Services in Paris, this paper examines psychiatric rehabilitation alternatives to youth imprisonment. The contemporary surge in juvenile delinquency, youth extremism and radicalization, as well as conduct disorders among adolescents have challenged the rehabilitative and containment potential of the prison. Youngsters come out of incarceration being radicalized, in deeper drug dependencies, and often with aggravated long-standing psychic traumas from abuse or solitary confinement. Since 1945, France has been devising alternative experimental institutions where criminal youth could be hosted, contained but also rehabilitated. The triple psychiatric, psychological and educative investment of adjudicated adolescents, aims at reintegrating these alienated adolescents in novel social webs, allow them to construct personal projects for the future, and provide them with the psychiatric and psychological support that is necessary to many. This paper explores some of these experimental approaches by examining how the alienated, criminal and sometimes radicalized youth of the Parisian banlieue, invest these opportunities and weave meaningful relationships with their care-takers. How diagnostic categories, ranging from conduct disorder and antisocial personality to psychopathy and borderline personality disorder, are negotiated among psychiatrists, psychologists and specialized educators. The ethnographic vignettes will complicate the motivational positionalities of social actors and appose the implicit demand for a psychiatric diagnostic of educators and families seeking refuge in the safety, clarity and exculpation of a psychiatric diagnostic and the hesitant reticence of pedopsychiatrists to medicalize deviance.
        Speaker: Christos Panagiotopoulos (Cornell University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Ambivalent Solidarities and Fiscal Reciprocities: P 5.1

      Room 3.106

      Human societies have been constructing social solidarity beyond kin groups for many millennia. States have continuously expanded their capacities to extract resources from their subjects. From whom such revenues are collected and for whose benefit they are used is the outcome of political processes in which considerations of justice and morality are central. The study of taxation therefore engages with multiple key relations: between equity and efficiency; state and market; private property and collective goods; individual and society. We invite ethnographically informed proposals that address the ethical foundations of taxation policies as they are actually implemented. What is considered fair taxation and notions of who is deserving of support vary greatly. In Scandinavia, strong welfare states were formed on the basis of reciprocity and shared norms of compliance. The bulk of revenue came from taxing individual income in progressive fashion. The state socialism of the Soviet bloc, by contrast, emphasized redistribution via central planning. Individual incomes were more equal and their taxation did not play a significant role. How can postsocialist states replicate the accomplishments of their erstwhile rivals in the West? Or, in the era of neoliberalism, digitization, and experiments with new institutions such as the share economy, is the taxation-based welfare state no longer a viable model even in its former strongholds? What new varieties of state-society-citizen relations formed through taxation might offer alternative forms of solidarity across the boundaries of social class and between different types of taxpayer?
      Conveners: Dr. Chris Hann (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology), Dr. Lotta Björklund Larsen (University of Exeter Business School)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.106
      • 11:00 Game of Tax. The peculiar relations between citizens and state in Georgia viewed through an invoice lottery 20'
        Taxation and gambling are two very different ways of exchanging. Gambling is voluntary and seems lively, effortless and playful, yet studies of gambling show the seriousness involved and its ritualistic qualities. Gambling maintains the rigid hierarchy among the Balinese (Geertz 1973), displays Greek masculinity through nonchalant behavior (Herzfeld 1991) and reinforces social inequality (Binde 2005). Taxation on the other is governments dull revenue collection forcing citizens and other taxable bodies to pay. Taxation is what politics is all about: who should pay, how much is needed, and how and on whom should the state spend the revenue. It is a way to understand any society and its political life (Schumpeter 1954). Taxation have redistributive effects – just like gambling are said to have (Woodburn 1982).
          
          What can a combination of such diverse exchanges have on our understanding of a given society? Based on fieldwork among stakeholders and participants in the Georgian version of a tax lottery tried in 2012, this presentation explores its socio-economic implications to the background of the country’s rapid political and economic development. The purpose of a tax lottery is increased tax compliance. It aims to motivate consumers in any commercial transaction to ask for a receipt qua lottery ticket and ensure that businesses pay due taxes. Tax lotteries thus have a dual function; more revenue is collected from businesses while making consumer do soft-policing work while having the chance of a win.
        Speakers: Dr. Lotta Björklund Larsen (University of Exeter Business School), Mr. Nino Muench (Lund University)
      • 11:20 Give a man a tax haven - an anthropology of real-world politics of distribution 20'
        With the release of the so-called Panama Papers, a widespread network of tax havens and offshore shell-companies hit global newsrooms like a bombshell. Numerous enquiries from critical journalist networks and national tax agencies followed. What this and further document released since revealed is that a significant share of global fiscal transactions happens beyond the radar of national tax authorities. Economic historians and critical scholars from other disciplines have since argued that the roots of this network of tax havens date back to the 1920s. 
          This paper amends James Ferguson’s felicitous concept of “politics of distribution” so that it applies to real-world situations of distribution under advanced capitalist conditions, namely to tax havens and tax evasion. Building on case studies from the above-mentioned enquiries into the world of tax havens and tax evasion and also on my own long-term research on Mauritius, one of the world’s leading tax havens, and on special economic zones, where corporations enjoy so-called tax holidays as one among several investment incentives, I suggest an anthropological theory of anti-social exchanges in contemporary capitalism that is able to capture the widespread practice of individuals and corporations that refuse to pay their fair share and do not contribute to national redistributive systems.
        Speaker: Dr. Patrick Neveling (Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen)
      • 11:40 “They are eating my money:" Stories on fair taxation, corruptions and the state in rural Uganda 20'
        This paper addresses the narratives surrounding taxation practices in rural Uganda. Most taxes at the district level in Uganda are outsourced to the highest bidder, a ‘sub-contractor’, who thereupon, is also allowed to hire ‘assistants’. In doing so, the district government is losing overview of revenue collections, as extra knots are included in the chains of implementation. Consequently, who is collecting taxes, what is being taxed and how often something is taxed, is becoming less transparent. This raises questions on who is the ‘government official’ and what he or she represents. Concerns among local citizens about fair taxing, corruption and nepotism have led to reluctance among people on the market to pay taxes. Simultaneously, tax collectors, often born in the same area and sharing similar cultural norms, are embedded in the same local socio-economic relationships as their neighbours, friends and relatives selling their products on the market. Their relationships to people create room for negotiation regarding what is considered a fair tax, who should pay tax and who is deserving to pay less. Based on 9 months of ethnographic research, this paper is concerned with the implementation of taxation in Kisoro district, western Uganda. It looks into the moral and ethical considerations of individual ‘government officials’, their relationship with citizens and how consequently notions about the state are being (re)established.
        Speaker: Danse Anna Maria de Bondt (Tilburg University and the University of Edinburgh)
      • 12:00 Tax evasion and household economy: reconceptualizations of redistribution among tobacco growers in a memoranda Greek provincial town 20'
        In parallel with the implementation of severe austerity measures in memoranda Greece, heavy taxation both of income (enterprise profits, wages and pensions) and commodities was implemented, in order to repay part of the Greek public debt. In Agrinio, a provincial town in central Greece, as a result of unemployment and/or severe diminution of revenues, undeclared household tobacco growing has become during the last years a common part-time occupation for the population of the city and its surrounding countryside. At the same time, the heavy taxation of cigarettes has led to a high demand for row tobacco and to its illicit trafficking from the fields to the Greek capital and other big cities. Small scale tobacco production isn’t a new activity in Agrinio but rather a long-term economic practice abandoned by most households during the 1990’s. The return to it is nowadays perceived as the “only way” to cope with the challenges of labour deregulation and social marginalization and is based on a “tradition” of alternative interpretations of official policies. The paper deals with the everyday negotiations of tax paying and tax evading among tobacco growers and the forms of value, legality and morality they produce in a context of antagonism and unsolidarity between the households and of a sense of total abandonment of the rural sector from the state.
        Speaker: Dr. Aliki Angelidou (Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Solidarity in times of (in)security: P 2.1

      Room 3.160

      In the context of current multiple global crises, a new tide of militarization promises security, providing a recognition of individual value based on belonging to protected groups. Multiple forms of grassroots and cross-class organizations operate this aspect of solidarity, often beyond territories covered by official security policies. Meanwhile, initiatives running counter to militarization and securitization propose a notion of security based on solidarity. For example, the Refugees Welcome initiative in Germany aims at fostering solidarity with refugees amidst societal debates on the insecurity that refugees are seen to cause. The Transition movement promotes a politics towards the climate crisis based in preference for local systems of mutual help, instead of top-down security measures. The centrality of security in current debates about climate, immigration, or economic welfare tends to obscure its silent pendant – the force of solidarity. The theorization of the complex nexus between solidarity and security in current reactions to global crises might be a major anthropological contribution to understanding and dealing with current crises. The panel aims at examining the relationship between security and solidarity, asking: - How do solidarities emerge and function in an age of (in)security, and how do they change or undermine practices and discourses of (in)security? - How do rationalities of solidarity and rationalities of security stand in contrast, opposition, or complementarity to each other, or, more ambiguously, in complicity with each other? We seek ethnographically informed cases which discuss these and other connex issues, aiming at theorizing the nexus between security and solidarity.
      Conveners: Dr. Ana Ivasiuc (Justus Liebig University), Dr. Agnes Gagyi (University of Gothenburg)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.160
      • 11:00 Contesting (in)security: Reflections on the role of solidarity in the everyday lives of Roma in Scotland 20'
        The status of EU migrants, and more especially the already disadvantaged minority groups among them, remains uncertain despite the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union in March 2019 looming ever closer. Roma, Europe’s largest and most persecuted minority group, are particularly at risk across an increasingly hostile and unwelcoming Britain. In this paper I will draw on my ongoing ethnographic fieldwork with Brexit as a backdrop, to explore the ways in which the three main facets of citizenship (rights, duties, and participation) are experienced in the daily lives of Roma people living in Glasgow. Moreover, I will reflect on the role and influence of acts of solidarity as a strategy to obtain security in an increasingly uncertain and insecure context. I aim to reflect on Roma as active agents in their pursuit of security through solidarity with other Roma and non-Roma in a localised, every day context. This occurs on different levels of claims making, including larger demonstrations of solidarity such as International Roma Day celebrations, and the more mundane practices in everyday life such as using a local drop-in centre. In doing so, I will explore the ways in which feelings and acts of solidarity influence and shape Roma’s everyday experiences of (in)security.
        Speaker: Blair Biggar (University of Glasgow)
      • 11:20 Drug Economy in Marginalized Areas in the Czech Republic: Between Social Mobility and Residential Alienation 20'
        Czech socially excluded localities (SELs) are pockets of urban marginality much smaller in size than American ghettos, French banlieus or British areas of multiple deprivation. All of these places are, to some extent, affected by drug economy and SELs are no exception. This economy brings into the dynamic of urban marginality two crucial trends: emancipatory and disruptive. It creates a livelihood, new career possibilites for young men in these areas - but it also contributes to community disruption by causing physical, psychological and social harm. This paper aspires to provide an insight into one aspect of drug economy which connects both of these meanings: residential alienation. Drawing on my 17-months ethnographic research in one of the SELs in Ostrava in North-Moravian region, I will illustrate the analytical weight of this concept (originally developed by Peter Marcuse) by empirical evidence of the struggle of local community leaders against local drug dealers. Anti-drug measures in the neighbourhood were led by the logic of in/securitization: drugs have been presented as a security threat by the community leaders which was followed by security measures based on repression of local dealers adopted by state and municipality. This configuration led to the growing suspicion among the local inhabitants and towards official authorities, and disrupted the potential of solidarity needed for resistance against the forthcoming process of gentrification.
        Speaker: Dr. Petr Kupka (Department of Anthropology, University of West Bohemia)
      • 11:40 Economy Memory of Solidarity and Security 20'
        Europe has never been so secure and safe than it is today. The feelings of threat, insecurity and return of exclusivist solidarities have nevertheless substantially increased. The economic globalisation is considered the major source of insecurity and formations of new solidarity patterns in Eastern Europe are considered as particularly connected with the introduction of liberal capitalism after state-socialism. This paper aims to question this recent origin of (in)security/solidarity nexus and show how current concerns on security and solidarity are related to economic memory, i. e. to livelihood practices and ideas about the material world projected to the past by the present day politics.
          My first empirical case deals with Gorals, Tatra highlanders of Polish-Slovak borderland, whose tourist economy in Zakopane has integrated them into majority society while in the same time kept Gorals different from the ethnic majority. In the second case I argue that political radicals vis-à-vis the Roma in Slovakia mobilize neither ‘socialist’ nor ‘capitalist’ work ethnics, but the one I derive from post-peasant condition conomy has to be redrawn in a novel waye: kinship ties, material well-being, me Minister of Po. In the third case I return to my older research on (in)tolerance on the Polish-Ukrainian borderland and refer to East European refugee xenophobia in order to prove that solidarity and security in post-socialist European Union can only be politically enacted with regard to economy memory.
        Speaker: Juraj Buzalka (Comenius University, FSES, Social Anthropology)
      • 12:00 Pushing the boundaries: agency and resistance of refugee activists in Europe 20'
        In the aftermath of the events categorized as “refugee crisis”, which I have been following since 2015, most European countries tightened their admission criteria for asylum seekers, leaving many individuals and families "out of the system" or turned, even if temporarily, “destitute”, under bureaucratic asylum procedures. As a consequence, asylum seekers had to learn how to navigate informal solidarity networks to survive and "find their way" in the host countries. Refugees with legal status in Portugal created their own grassroot associations, organizing regular solidarity initiatives to improve their communities' lives. As an observer and a participant in these initiatives I have been witnessing how they stand as a form of resistance to what seems to be an increasing intimidation of volunteers and activists throughout Europe. Informal solidarity actors have a crucial role in humanizing "feared" asylum seekers through conviviality and familiarization. Solidarity adds complexity where asylum policies and EU leaders convey “simple” messages. While most politicians seem committed to deter and limit the ability of asylum seekers to remain in Europe, a wide range of people, with no formal obligations, is showing alternatives and promoting social inclusion. From the experiences I have been witnessing in the past 3 years, not only in Portugal but also in the UK and in Greece, I conclude that, even when the sociopolitical environment is hostile, in empirical ethnographic work we can "zoom in" to a completely different reality, filled with the nuances that are to be expected in human relationships.
        Speaker: Dora Rebelo (CRIA, IUL-ISCTE)
      • 12:20 Medicine Vs. the State: Professional and National Solidarities in the Struggle Against Force-Feeding in Israel 20'
        In 2015 the Israeli parliament legislated the Force-Feeding Act which allows the force-feeding of hunger striking prisoners. This legislation started in 2014 during the hunger strike of 80 Palestinian political prisoners, and in reaction to a massive 1600 Palestinian prisoners strike in 2012. The two consecutive Israeli ministers of Public Security who lead the legislation declared that the recurring strikes pose a security threat to the state. Both explicitly stated that the purpose of this law is to stifle Palestinian prisoners’ resistance. But state attempts to legalize and practice force-feeding were met with resistance from doctors.
          This paper looks into different solidarity networks of physicians in the power struggle between medical professionals and the Israeli state. In particular, it looks into doctors’ call for conscientious objection, and the moral and political justifications they employed. I analyze the acts of three main networks of doctors: (1) the Israeli Medical Association which invoked ideas of universal medical ethics and global networks of professional solidarity in the resistance to the legislation; (2) Civil society organizations, lead by Physicians for Human rights, who advocated for prisoners’ political rights; and (3) Palestinian physicians who hold Israeli citizenship that resisted in national solidarity.
          This is a rare case of physicians’ participation in the highly politicized Israeli ‘security discourse’ and these three solidarity networks gained different levels of legitimacy in the public sphere. I show how medical ethics, the ethos of medical neutrality and ideas of humanistic medicine played a role in forming and mobilizing professional solidarities.
        Speaker: Dr. Guy Shalev (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Games, Technology and Concepts: resources we use for teaching and learning anthropology [IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education]: P 23.1

      Room 2.4

      We invite participants to showcase resources used to teach and learn anthropology. This panel provides a hands-on complement to the ‘Teaching and Learning’ panel from the IUAES Commission on Anthropology and Education. Rather than traditional paper proposals, our vision is to show, tell and discuss games, technology and concepts which are used around the world to teach anthropology courses and ideas (and to teach anthropologically). In additional to contributing to a visual showcase of resources from around the world, we invite presenters to explore why and how particular teaching and learning resources work (or don’t work) in particular contexts. What role do physical games, video games, websites, films, role-play activities, podcasts and items of material culture play in anthropology education? What types of resources help build anthropological ways of thinking? What creative ways are there to engage students? How have anthropology teaching and learning resources changed over the last fifty years? How might resources change in the next fifty years? What role can technology play in the teaching and learning of anthropology? What makes learning memorable and how can we take students’ interests and preferences into account? By bringing resources together from around the world we will consider how to select and adapt resources for particular local contexts. It’s a chance to explore creative possibilities for learners and teachers to engage with anthropology.
      Conveners: Ms. Emma Ford (Royal Anthropological Institute), Dr. Mailing Rivera Lam (Coordinadora Subsede Catedra UNESCO Lectura y escritura, Directora Proyecto ACACIA, Universidad de Antofagasta)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.4
      • 11:00 The Gamification of Learning in Cultural Anthropology 20'
        In my paper I approach gamification as a viable alternative to other ways of teaching Anthropology. After more than a decade of teaching Cultural Anthropology, I argue that serious games offer the possibility to immerse oneself in a virtual heterotopia that is attractive because it can easily be personalized for one's learning needs. Moreover, gamification entails an abandonment of the sharp distinction between fun and learning. Similarly to anthropologists, the designers of serious games have to understand a lot about the ways in which people learn and play in order to create succesfull games. The reason behind this necessity resides in the fact that humans have the tendency to learn easier through playing. Serious games offer a more holistic experince than other methods, like simulations for example, beacuse they entail places in which space, time and meaning is juxtaposed. This places are, for all intents and purposes, virtual heterotopias. Building upon Michel Foucault's insights regarding heterotopias and their proliferation in virtual space, I assert that creating sandbox places (i.e. a type of virtual heterotopias) within games can be effective in meeting the particular learning needs of those aspiring to learn what Anthropology can offer them both for personal and career development. Gamification can provide a holistic answer to questions like: What is anthropology? What anthropologists do? Why do we need Anthropology? How, when and where to apply anthropological insight?
        Speaker: Mihai Burlacu (Transilvania University of Brasov)
      • 11:20 The Porta Game: ethnography and technology 20'
        Porta is a game created to develop language skills, communication and scientific thinking. Its construction and validation was developed in stages of ethnographic systematization, disciplinary didactics and research on accessible and affective education.
          The learning approach is anthropological and socio-constructionist, based on ethnographic studies developed with schoolchildren in northern Chile to collect their representations about biodiversity and the environment.
          The three principles of literacy through texts and images are: contextualized in the nortina culture, functional because it allows learning the environment and is significant for school children between 5 and 10 years of age.
          This Game, also, was validated in the ACACIA Project through the evidence of the use of the Curricular Referents of Learning (RCA) in language and sciences for educational faculties elaborated by the researchers of the Alter-Nativa Network, 2017. In 2018, the downloadable application was designed in mobile game equipment.
        Speaker: Dr. Lam Mailing Rivera (Universidad de Antofagasta)
      • 11:40 Film-clip fun: teaching and learning with ethnographic video 20'
        Join us for a showcase! Take part in educational activities and discussions based on an ethnographic film-clip. Build learning with film at the centre, not the edge. Come away with a practical example to use with your class, lecture, tutorial or seminar group. Find out how to take film further.
         
        
         
        Showcasing a teaching resource from ‘Ethnographic Video Online, Teaching Edition’, we will consider the possibilities for using film in anthropology education. Introductory anthropology courses in schools, universities, extra-curricular clubs and online platforms can all benefit from this.
         
        
         
        What different types of films are there and how can we use them? How can we integrate ethnographic film with the study of texts and theory? What barriers dissuade teachers and lecturers from using film? How can we make ethnographic films quicker and easier to use for teachers and learners?
         
        
         
        What possibilities do mobile technology and video streaming offer?
         
        What might we be able to do with film in the future?
        Speaker: Emma Ford (Royal Anthropological Institute)
      • 12:00 The acquisition and Teaching of local Anthropology knowledge based on the practice of Aba Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture,Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Southwest China 20'
        The ethnic groups of southwest China have been the interest for anthropologists.the cultures of this region are known to the world through anthropologists'descriptions,but how to make the young people inherit and familiarize themselves with their own culture?In recent years,through collecting and organizing of local knowledge,and by means of teaching,the local anthropology knowledge is imparted to the next generation.Culture is acquired through learning,which is influenced by local geography,climate and other factors.The resulting anthropological knowledge includes livelihood,musical art,dress making and so on.Students and teachers interact with each other in the teaching process.The teaching of local anthropology is far from a simple statement,but more a way of participation. This is the teaching of local knowledge that is compatible with the local environment,which is different from that of the past always fill the main teaching content with distant knowledge unfamiliar to the local people.This article mainly takes Aba Tibetan and Qiang autonomous prefectures and Liangshan Yi autonomous prefectures in southwest China as examples.It introduces how local knowledge,which is always the subject of anthropologist research,is collected,organized,compiled, and entered the classroom by the means of teaching.To connect with students,and to explore how education to teenagers through local anthropology can influence their understanding of the past, present and future of their region.
        Speaker: Zhiyong Yang (Sichuan University/University of Duisburg and Essen)
      • 12:20 Role of Kasturba Balika Vidhyalaya on the Tribal Girls in Latehar district of Jharkhnd, India 20'
        Special Schools were established in the backward regions of India in the year 2004-05 to ensure universal intake and quality education. In India situation of Girls education is not up to the mark, the situation is worse in the rural areas. Primary aim of such schools was to provide facilities for primary education to all the girls in rural areas. Special attention is paid to the dropouts. This is basically a government programme which is jointly executed by the state and central government. However the results are very positive but the set goals are yet to be achieved. This paper looks into the impacts factor of these schools over the tribal girls. The study is done in the tribal area. Most of the students in the school come from the tribal communities. the objective of the study was to find out socio-economic impact that the school has brought upon the girls in last decade. Primary method of data collection was observation and personal interviews with the students and guardians to measure the social change and other impacts that the school has made. This study would be useful for the policy makers to evaluate their endeavor and make policy changes if needed.
        Speaker: Dr. Subasi Barla (DSE, LATEHAR, GOVERNEMTN OF JHARKHAND, INDIA)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Beyond identities? Strategic solidarities in/of the political: P 9.1

      Room 3.44

      The late industrial condition features the entanglements of global and local, government and business, law and politics, nature and science. It embraces various social, cultural, political, economic and technical nested systems, which are all involved in multiple interactions (Fortun 2012). Effectively, the contemporary witnesses specific shifts in social movements, initiatives and events of various historically dispossessed subjects. Identity politics and political aims of formerly precisely defined social groups (e.g. indigenous people, women, the LGBT, workers, ecologists etc.), which for a long time shaped conventional types of activism, have recently given way to alternative political practices. This brought new forms of solidarities emerging at the intersections of previously distinct and (supposedly) distant social and political categories and identities. Thus, the political becomes an arena where more or less stable relations and affinities are being strategically forged to act for specific and elusive ideas of “social change.” In the process, “collective togetherness” of different temporal and spatial scales are being created (Dzenovska, De Genova 2018).
      Conveners: Dr. Monika Baer (University of Wroclaw), Dr. Anika Keinz (European University Viadrina)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.44
      • 11:00 Forged Identity: Understanding Transgender and Social Exclusion in Odisha (India) 20'
        Transgender people in India face legal and social difficulties not experienced by common persons. Over the past decade, though LGBT people have gained more and more tolerance in India, especially in large cities, nonetheless, most LGBT people in India remain closeted, fearing discrimination from their families, who might see homosexuality as shameful. Reports of honour killings, attacks, torture, and beatings of members of the LGBT community are not uncommon in India. Discrimination and ignorance are particularly present in rural areas, where LGBT people often face rejection from their families and forced opposite-sex marriages. The Supreme Court of India decriminalised homosexuality by declaring Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code unconstitutional in September 2018 which allowed the freedom to the transgender people to live together freely.
          Even then the transgender people face social exclusion not only from society but also from own families. Hence, building on ethnographic study of transgender people of Ganjam district of Odisha (India), the present study seeks to explore the process, causes and consequences of social exclusion of transgender people from the society especially from their families. In the process, the paper makes an humble effort to explore how the transgender people build their separate identities beyond their families.
        Speaker: Ratnakar Palei (Khallikote Autonomous College, Khallikote University)
      • 11:20 Solidarity and difference in current trans* communities 20'
        In my anthropological research I observe the different negotiations of trans_gender in current Germany in different spheres - such as trans* communties, media, everyday life, medical and legal context - and put them into dialogue with trans* selfnarrations and autoethnographic insides. Based on this research I analyze in my presentation how solidarity and difference are negotiated and put in action in two different trans* related contexts in specific ways.With ethnographic insides of a discussion before the last elections with politicians of different parties organized by the national trans* organization and different events of the activist initiative trans*sexworks I draw a picture of different ways of dealing with solidarity, imaginations of collectiveness and difference. How and when it is refered to different narrations of trans_gender, how do different political aims are brought up to create political aims beyond identities and how do these claims corespond with identity based politics at the same time in theses events and thus shape imaginations of trans_gender, while also working on ‚bigger topics of social change‘?
        Speaker: Marek Sancho Höhne (European University Viadrina)
      • 11:40 Disunited Under One Flag? LGBT activists and allies against Trump 20'
        Following the 2016 U.S. Presidential election, residents of an affluent Washington, D.C. suburb staged a striking protest, flying rainbow flags from their homes when Vice-Present elect Mike Pence took up temporary residence in the area, in response to his homophobic and misogynistic voting record. Although notably few homeowners identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans (LGBT), their flags remained long after Pence left. His presence also compelled city-wide queer and trans rights groups to organise a “queer dance party” outside his house, replete with rainbow imagery. Similar protests later targeted the offices and homes of other Trump affiliates promoting anti-LGBT legislation. At first blush, these actions suggest an unusually coalitional statement of solidarity in the battle for LGBT rights, coalesced around an internationally recognisable symbol of gay liberation. Ethnographic data however reveals the fractions, tensions and ambivalences undergirding homeowners’ and activists’ attitudes and actions. Homeowners described their flags as protesting the Trump Presidency overall, rarely mentioning LGBT rights, through a “non-aggressive” aesthetic. Meanwhile, local LGBT activists began to explicitly eschew and critique rainbow imagery when mounting an anti-corporate protest against D.C. Pride, whose sponsors included companies that donated to the Trump campaign or benefited from his policies.
          
          These examples demonstrate how different groups are reassessing the parameters of LGBT identity, rights, and allyship, and the contours of resistance to the Trump administration, through selective engagements with and disavowals of, the rainbow flag. Their interventions raise important questions concerning the space between symbolic and tangible displays of political resistance and solidarity.
        Speaker: Dr. Siobhan McGuirk (Goldsmiths University of London)
      • 12:00 Political identities as strategic solidarities and their polarizing power 20'
        In the times of “destabilised identity” (Erksen / Schober 2016), political identities become particularly distinctive strategic solidarities implemented in discursive declarations and performative practices, such as voting in elections, joining political demonstrations or campaigning online. What is more, political identities possess a public and ideological character; they engage imagination, memory, common sense, and entangle media content. They are not typical examples of identity politics but they also arouse great emotions; thus, they may be termed “communities of feeling” (Berezin 2001). Moreover, political identities always constitute an “unlimited” identity project (in Giddensian meaning), which continues to be processed, undermined, and subjected to various influences and constant impositions. The never-ending process of continual border negotiation (Snow 2001), the constant play of inclusion and exclusion relations, entangled in the awakened emotions, determine the power of internal solidarity and external hostility. This continuous polarization gives rise to political opponents, a “constitutive outside” (Mouffe 1992) against which the groups position themselves. This dynamic relationship of antagonism and mutual construction of polarized identities will be the main subject of my speech. The fieldwork material illustrating these processes comprises of records of interviews conducted since 2000 in the villages of the Nowy Targ County and at the city marketplace, in cooperation with successive groups of ethnology students from the University of Warsaw. I will also use the materials from Master's theses on political demonstrations (March of Independence) and from students’ works summarizing the "Political issues on-line" workshop, conducted by myself in 2017 and 2018.
        Speaker: Dr. Anna Malewska-Szałygin (University of Warsaw, Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology)
      • 12:20 Telling the war. Interplay and historical narration about conflict in Donbas 20'
        This paper aims at exploring the problem of the long-term impact of war and propagandain the
          Donbass region. It is also an attempt to trace how different sides of the conflict in Western Ukraine
          position themselves and how they use history and references to different events, not connected with the conflict per se, in creating discourse abot the war.
          Donbas conflict cannot be explained simply by population distribution in the Ukraine and Donetsk
          People's Republic (DPR) or other social factors. It was created by politicians who exploited the
          differences and opposing viewpoints on 20th century history: Ukrainian nationalism on the one hand, and nostalgia for the Soviet era coupled with pro-Russian agitation on the other.
          It is also a conflict over identity. Over one’s self-perception as a Ukrainian, Russian or resident of the Donbass region. One’s perception of Red Army soldiers fighting Nazi Germany as heroes – or,on the contrary, of the anti-Soviet insurgents fighting on behalf of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists as the true heroes. By presenting a case study of media and political reactions on events in Volnovakha and Donetsk, where the civilians were killed in shelling. I will show how the war is rationalised through refences to historical events, but also to contemporary symbols like „Je suis charlie”, that position two sides od the conflict on the East - West axis and also legitimise warfare.
        Speaker: Marek Berezowski (Instytut Etnologii i Antropologii Kulturowej UW)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Local Nature Using in the 21st ctntury: Global Responsibility and Solidarity [Commission on the Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development]: P 4.1

      Room 2.104

      Anthropologists and other scholars have documented very different views of human relationships with nature in different societies with diverse cultures. Indigenous people have been displaced by immigrants with a different survival strategy who have destroyed the nature on which the local people survived. They had used their environment carefully and preserved it for generations. International law supports the claims of indigenous people to their territories and resources, which are sought after by powerful corporations and their governmental supporters. Quite often new technologies assist actively in producing great changes in local landscape and biodiversity, in the areas involved into process of industrial reconstruction. The cultures of local indigenous people support not just their own lives but also all the rest of peoples by taking care of the survival of the environments that they protect. Anthropologists can help to sustain the environment by solidarity with indigenous people and their environments with education but also with international law. In this panel, both theoretical and empirical papers will discuss perspectives on the realization of a process of education on Sustainability for reducing risks in strategies of Nature-Society relationships.
      Conveners: Dr. Viacheslav Rudnev (Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology), Dr. Dorothy Billings (Wichita State University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.104
      • 11:00 Sustainability: In the Eye of the Beholder 20'
        In recent years the long occupation by indigenous peoples of particular locales , which they see as home and as the resting places of ancestors, has brought them public attention in the industrialized world, and has attracted environmentalists to learn from them This collaboration has sometimes been successful, and sometimes divisive; because people define sustainability in different ways, depending on their respective modes of survival. What looks like a member of a rare wild species to one observer looks like dinner to another. Some examples of these conflicts will be cited, especially from the Pacific.
         
        Changes in the indigenous contexts have required local peoples to modify their own cultures, including their traditional modes of survival. Invasion and colonial settlement have often resulted in major changes. Even where colonialism has been less invasive, Western medicine has led to population increase and major new demands on environmental resources. Examples will be cited from the Pacific and around the world.
         
        When indigenous peoples are taken into nation states they must conform to new laws which regulate resource ownership and access. The elimination of common ownership has led to changes in survival activities which have then led to changes in approaches to sustainability.
        Speaker: Prof. Dorothy Billings (Wichita State University)
      • 11:20 The significance of the Nordic Saami Convention of 2017 20'
        The Nordic Saami Convention of 2017, entered into between Sweden, Norway and Finland, was written to protect the rights of the Saami, a cross-national indigenous peoples, whose principal livelihood is reindeer husbandry.
          The Convention contains 51 articles which mandate greater autonomy for the Saami people in decision making with respect to their land, resources and preservation of traditional knowledge and culture. We shall review the significance of the Convention with special attention to the provision requiring Saami consent to economic development projects which have a substantial, adverse effect on Saami life. The Convention will be of assistance in interpreting the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and customary international law regardless of whether this treaty is ratified by the parliaments of the three countries. Furthermore, the Convention would resolve border disputes between Sweden and Norway over Saami reindeer crossing the Swedish-Norway border for grazing purposes.
        Speaker: Dr. James Phillips (Wichita Indochinese Center)
      • 11:40 Local nature using and Social Impact Assessment. The case of Russia 20'
        The author speaks about the Russian Model of the Social Impact Assessment (SIA) as the methodology to review the social effects of infrastructure projects and otherdevelopment interventions. Social impact assessment includes the processes of analyzing, monitoring and managing the intended and unintended social consequences, both positive and negative, of planned interventions (policies, programs, plans, projects) and any social change processes invoked by those interventions. Its primary purpose is to bring about a more sustainable and equitable biophysical and human environment. I’ll analyze the ways to assess the impacts on society of certain development schemes and projects before they go ahead - for example, new roads, industrial facilities, mines, dams, ports, airports, and other infrastructure projects. Special attention will be paid to the cultural impact of that acts in Russia. Our attention would be turned to the evolution (transformation) of traditional culture in the modern world in general and in nowadays’ Russia especially, focusing on the problem of local nature using and food preferences. The ongoing changes in the world are so radical that the everyday life, previously understood as one of the most conservative areas of human activity, is now experiencing the results of global cultural shifts.
        Speaker: Prof. Marina Martynova (Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology RAS)
      • 12:00 Forest. Local business and Vital resource. 20'
        Traditionally the forest has a great complicated role as a being of human society. From generation to generation many peoples in different areas of the Earth used the forest as a place for leaving and a resource for carrying out their life-support activity. The forest gave wood for constructing houses, food for life and plants for medical treatment. As a result, the forest was not only an important resource for supporting the life of folk peoples, but also their “school” of life, full of sacred places (special groves). 
          In the industrial period the main interest of society in a forest was concentrated on felling trees for buildings and using wood as a fuel. In the 20th century post industrial society attention has been focused on the role of the forest in the process of interchange of gases in the atmosphere (Tropical forests reduce the content of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere). The risks of global warming (and of changing the climate) has activated anxiety in modern society about forest. Local problems of deforestation in Amazonia area became a problem for the global world community.
          Deforestation in the Amazonia area became an alarming fact for ecologists. In this context special attention to local folk traditions in sparing nature (forest) using and folk ethics have value for modern society. In my presentation I will examine how local folk knowledge may be useful for solving modern global problems in the environment, in the context of next generations interests.
        Speaker: Dr. Viacheslav Rudnev (Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology)
      • 12:20 Agro-biodiversity under Shifting Cultivation System in the Context of Climate Change 20'
        Shifting cultivation is one of the very first forms of agriculture practiced by indigenous communities and its survival into the modern world suggests that it is a flexible and highly adaptive means of production. It is an agricultural system in which plots of land are cultivated temporarily, then abandoned and allowed to revert to their natural vegetation while the cultivator moves on to another plot. The period of cultivation is usually terminated when the soil shows signs of exhaustion or, more commonly, when the field is overrun by weeds. The length of time that a field is cultivated is usually shorter than the period over which the land is allowed to regenerate by lying fallow.
          Clearing and burning of standing forests, as perceived by tribal practitioners, is ecologically stable cycles of cropping and fallowing. It is a form of land use which enhances biodiversity. Severe declines in plant diversity as well as agro-biodiversity have been observed in most areas when shifting cultivation is replaced by permanent land use systems. Shifting cultivators have preserved agro-biodiversity through local rules, practices and the informal networks for exchange of seeds and traditional knowledge, thus ensuring food security of their communities. Along with the replacement of shifting cultivation comes the collapse of these networks – a drastic change in social climate, which results in a substantial loss of crop genetic resources. The availability of high genetic diversity in agricultural crops has however been identified as a key element in adaptation strategies to climate change.
        Speaker: Dr. Sushree Sangita Mohanty (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences (KISS))
    • 11:00 - 12:45 The Intersections of Tourism, Migration, and Exile [Commission on the Anthropology of Tourism & Commission on the Anthropology of Migration]: P 25.1

      Room 2.123

      "The aim of the panel is to explore the intersecting terrain between the varied forms of spatial mobility. Our goal is to problematize the seemingly-fixed boundaries separating tourism, migration, and exile. We invite scholars interested in discussing how these mobilities intertwine, overlap and influence one another. Such intersections are multidimensional and multidirectional: migrants and established exiles can act as tourists; refugee communities might be the tourist attractions; migrants often work as laborers and entrepreneurs in the tourism sector; tourists, on the other hand, turn into migrant-entrepreneurs in the tourism sector or combine tourism with work. While tourism, migration and exile are usually researched and theorized separately, we believe that transcending the categorical boundaries within the anthropology of mobility and considering how differentiated distributions of power permeate them will contribute to social critiques of the way various forms of mobility are conceptualized in public discourses related to gender, class, ethnic, racial, and global inequalities (e.g. tourists from the Global North as cosmopolitan nomads versus migrants from the Global South as intruders). We hope that through deconstructing the conceptual foundations of these moral valorizations of people’s movement will enable us to built world solidarities with those whose movement is restrained. We are interested in both empirical case studies and discussions exploring how the above intersections enable us to deconstruct dichotomous classifications within mobility studies (tourists vs. migrants, migrants vs. refugees, leisure vs. work, voluntary vs. forced migration, etc.)."
      Conveners: Dr. Natalia Bloch (Warsaw University), Prof. Kathleen M. Adams (Loyola University Chicago)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.123
      • 11:00 IKEA in Havana: from tourism to migration to tourism again 20'
        For many Cubans living in Scandinavia, tourism has profoundly shaped their lives. It is the thread that weaves together the path of their mobility. This paper explores how their position vis-à-vis tourism shifts as they move from one nation context, Cuba, to another, Denmark. Most Cubans arrive in Denmark through marriage migration. Some worked in the Cuban tourism industry, and met their Danish spouses while they were visiting the island. When these categories of mobility, tourism and migration, intersected, the power differences between them became readily apparent. Their spouse’s international movement was fluid, facilitated by the tourism industry and a European passport. Once married to a Cuban, the Danish spouse realized that mobility was now constrained by two state systems that tightly controlled migration. Where tourism erases boundaries, migration builds walls. However, once established as legal migrants in Denmark, unlike Cubans in the US, they escaped the “exile” label and could easily return to Cuba as tourists themselves. In fact, many have become tourism entrepreneurs, buying apartments to rent out on Airbnb and furnishing them with housewares from IKEA. For many Cubans, their relationship to tourism has come full circle. With permanent residency or citizenship in Europe, they can now enjoy the fluid mobility granted to tourists from the Global North. In this paper, I argue that migration and tourism are deeply connected, and I examine how the intersection of these mobilities is affected by the states’ attempt to control the temporary or permanent movement of people. 
        Speaker: Dr. Nadine Fernandez (State University of NY Empire State College)
      • 11:20 Highly skilled professional mobility and tourism as intertwined practices 20'
        Tourism is embedded in the individual’s temporal and spatial life-path in complex ways and often related to other forms of temporal mobility (Urry 2002; Burns & Novelli 2008, Hall 2008). In our paper, we discuss the multidimensional, intertwined practices of professional mobility and tourism, building on two qualitative studies of highly-skilled Swedish professionals’ practices of “internationalization”. The studies focus medical professionals and Humanities scholars and teachers working abroad with research or teaching, e.g. going on postdocs, exchange programs, meetings and conferences. The stays abroad do not only bring scientific benefits and familiarity with divergent organisational infrastructures and practices, but are also perceived as an acceptable way for performing some tourist activities and getting to know places and “cultures”. The choice of location is informed not only by professional reasons, but also by “imagined geographies” connected to imageries of adventure or satisfying leisure activities, and thus to “good life” for the professional and sometimes even the accompanying family. A period of every-day life in a specific locality is supposed to enrich and deepen the tourist experience with more “authentic” familiarities and fluencies. The “foreign” places and practices may be a source of exotic bewilderment, but also of recognition of the commonality of the human condition – which recent trends in tourism strive for. We study the motifs and meanings behind the range of mobilities undertaken by the professionals, in life-course perspective – where travelling for work, learning and leisure might be combined in complex ways.
        Speaker: Dr. Katarzyna Wolanik Boström (Dept. of Culture and Media Studies)
      • 11:40 Mobility through investment activity: economics, leisure or lifestyle? 20'
        Investment as a way to get a residence permit is a strategy that in recent years has grown in Southern European countries as a way to reinvigorate national economy. In Portugal, in the first six years of the program, the foreign investment through the Golden Visa program has been almost exclusively concentrated on real estate investment. The policy grants a residence permit however, it does not require the investor to stay in Portugal, as it is mandatory for immigrants.
        The GV program coincides with a very favourable moment for tourism in Portugal: The country has been repeatedly awarded by World Travel Awards, especially Lisbon (2018) and Oporto (2017) cities. It is our conviction that there is a relationship between the growing numbers of investor visa grants and the attractiveness of Portugal as a touristic destination. This possible relationship raises questions such as:
        Are they immigrants, if they are excused from living and working in the country? Do they fit in the entrepreneurial migrant categories if their investment is on real estate? Are they more consumption lead migrants, tourists or are they people looking for experiencing a certain lifestyle?
        Our proposal is to construct an investor concept from inside looking for other dimensions rather than the exclusively economic one. The paper will address some of these questions using data from an exploratory ethnographic research with golden visa holders.
        Speaker: Dr. Maria de Fátima Amante (CAPP, ISCSP, Universidade de Lisboa)
      • 12:00 Samoan Emigrants and Homeland Tourism 20'
        It is only after WWII that Samoan overseas migrant communities were formed in the urban area of the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. The overseas population of Samoans is counted more than the population in the home islands of the Independent State of Samoa (ISS), the focus of this presentation, and American Samoa. The ISS became independent in 1962 and has been economically dependent on ODA from developed countries and remittances from emigrants. The remittances have been, of course, important for the local Samoans, and most of the family at home had relations overseas and dependent on the money sent home. Samoans at home do not necessarily need money for their everyday life but for special occasions on Samoan calendar especially for Church obligations and traditional life-cycle ceremonies. In the early 90s, the ISS government started tourism development which the government used to be reluctant to promote. The first idea was inviting foreign visitors to create another source of income, although we may find many Samoan emigrants among them. Many of them have some family obligations to do, others just enjoying visiting home and seeing/meeting relatives. There are some second and third-generation emigrant visitors to find their roots in Samoa. Many of them mostly stays with their family and relations while they spend some days at hotels and dine at restaurants. It is them who most appreciate Samoan cultural and traditional events. Homeland tourism is quite helpful to support ISS economy as well as remittances.
        Speaker: Dr. Matori Yamamoto (Hosei University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Gendered Solidarities, Fragmented Responsibilities: Researchers’ Responses to Challenging Times: P 24.1

      Room 3.46

      Over the last few decades, we have been facing an increasingly complex, messy and contradictory picture of the research field and what it takes to be a researcher in the contemporary world. On the one hand, there is increasing interest in co-creation and action-based methods with growing evidence that research engagement can produce significant shifts in knowledge, which results in beneficial change for communities. On the other hand, familiar patterns of power and discrimination persist in an increasingly interconnected world. We welcome interdisciplinary enquiries, artistic interventions, theoretical and empirical contributions, examining issues of solidarity, mobilising researchers to act for gender equality. Acknowledging that socially constructed bodies respond differently to dominance and subordination, through ambiguity, transgression, rebellion and protest, we seek contributions that engage feminist-inspired framings as a central axis for analysing the researcher and the researched. Tensions between pressures to conform and the need for resistance in the construction of academic writing, moreover, require further reflection from the perspective of our desire for solidarity and our responsibilities in the field. This panel focuses on critical reflections and methodological framings, the ways researchers negotiate their power, agency, and positionality, while transcending the boundaries of social or cultural anthropology, including, but not limited to, the following themes: - intersectional explorations of solidarity, gender and knowledge production - co-creating care - solidarities at the centre and periphery - feminist methods vs post-colonialism - solidarities of feminisms - ‘appropriate’ feminists: engagement, agency and change - solidarity, power and transgression - anthropology of friendship
      Conveners: Prof. Katarzyna Kosmala (University of the West of Scotland), Dr. Anna Sznajder (Polish Ethological Society), Prof. Fiona Hackney (Wolverhampton University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.46
      • 11:00 Trespassing on their boundaries as a total stranger: my fieldwork and forgiven experiences by trans – gender people in India. 20'
        "Since 2002, I have been working with hijras who renounced their gendered positions in their family, caste, and society in order to live as devotees of the Goddess. They were born and raised as males by family members, but subsequently left their hometowns and renounced their responsibilities for perpetuating patrilineal lines. Moreover, they have given up their inborn masculinity through the ritual of castration. 
          When I showed myself for the first time to hijras, they have never let me in their circle. Instead, they saw me as a trespasser and tried to drive me away. Getting used to each other, they shared some tea with me, and allowed me to stay in their circle. They also nominated one of their members to my guardian, and set up a quasi – official mother and daughter relation between us.
          Whenever I visited them, I stayed at my guardian’s house, and received some token gifts at my departure. With repetition, token gifts tuned into costly ones. Surprisingly, after my personal life event, childbirth outside the field, my quasi mother offered me golden gifts as a familial convention. That gift – giving and receiving practice made our quasi relationship transformed into something stable. 
          Looking back on these processes from a trespasser to a quasi mother – daughter relation, then a steady – state relationship, I will consider the significance of the gifts –giving and receiving practice as a way of forgiving a coexistence between strangers, furthermore, allocating a commitment and a new positionality."
        Speaker: Dr. Akiko Kunihiro (Waseda University)
      • 11:20 Solidarity with whom and how? Corpo/reality, embodiment and narratives in the health-related fieldwork experience. 20'
        "I intend to discuss the question of embodiment(s) and its consequences in the fieldwork in breast and prostate cancer support groups.
          Fieldwork is a bodily exercise for researcher(s). In this biomedical setting with differently gendered groups, the study is charged with additional dilemmas. “Embodiment” as dialectal process between embodied experience and the language available to articulate it in this case relate both to cancer survivors in theirs embodied illness narratives and to able-bodied researcher in her strategies to conduct and recap research experience. Thus, I am particularly focused on what is emerging within and beyond this encounter? Considering myself a feminist ethnographer, striving for attentive and reflexive about power relationships practice I cannot underestimate my own background and embodiment - both ""techniques du corps"" and the discourse (narrative) on that claimed in my academic and private praxis. The main question remains health-, age- (average age in both groups is sixtyish) and gender- (prostate cancer group) -related asymmetry in the fieldwork and the ways to handle it ""properly"" according to the discipline standards, feminist approach and my sense of integrity. Hence, a number of questions is important to raise, e.g.: what set of definable roles do this context make available for a researcher? What sort of negotiations those roles require from the researcher and researched? What are the responsibilities towards the group of activists with cancer experience and towards the discipline itself (academic activism)? Lastly, what kind of solidarity or solidarities, with whom and how is possible in this peculiar intersection?"
        Speaker: Katarzyna Słaby (Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University)
      • 11:40 Making Research Practice: the feminist researcher and everyday life 20'
        In her recent book Living a Feminist Life, Sara Ahmed reconnects feminist theory with everyday life. She argues that while feminists can become estranged from the world they critique, often through the process of naming problems, they also learn about the world from their efforts to transform it. This paper builds on Ahmed’s work to explore the learning possibilities available to the feminist researcher through two case study projects about women, textile crafts, and making processes as a means to enact change. Both projects also employ film as a reflective and reflexive device, draw on ethnographic methods, and understand research as a collaborative, co-produced practice. The first, titled ‘One Day When We Were Young’, involves Mah Rana, a craftsperson and researcher, and her mother who has early stage Alzheimer’s. It reveals how the practice of sewing together enabled a transformation in the power relations between daughter and mother/carer and ‘caree’. The second project, S4S Designing a Sensibility for Sustainable Clothing, involves a team of female researchers and examines the extent to which collective making workshops (knitting, embroidery, dress-making, repair, re-purposing) might serve as a means to engender a sensibility for sustainable fashion, promoting more ecologically friendly everyday clothing behaviors and choices.
        Speaker: Dr. Fiona Hackney (University of Wolverhampton/Faculty of Arts)
      • 12:00 (Re)voicing solidarity for women in shipbuilding: walking through the lines of the dominant heritage narrative 20'
        This paper examines two creative projects which have worked durationally to increase gender equality within existing heritage narratives. We discuss challenges they have encountered related to the representation of gender, and the potential of creative interventions to nuance dominant narratives (Smith, 2009). Specifically, we explore the potential of walking and other peripatetic methodologies as sites of embodied knowledge production, and employ intersectionality to problematise these challenges of representation. We explore the risks of epistemic privilege and the positionality of creative researchers within these processes.
          
          Using feminist-inspired framings as vehicles which can trouble dominant narratives, we examine ‘enactment’ through walking and first-person testimony as key tools to reframe the landscape of discourse. The sites of our analysis are creative projects focused on two maritime protest movements: the 1980 Solidarity strike in Gdansk, Poland; and the 1971 UCS Work-In in Govan, Glasgow, Scotland.
          
          We consider the role of artists and researchers in the active transmission and reframing of these herstories and critically investigate specific examples of participation within the co-creation of gendered heritage narratives, where ‘communities of interest’ are working within established heritage institutions and simultaneously straining against their management systems. We will consider how these developing ‘tensile systems’ might create layered representations of gender, acting both within and alongside existing narratives.
          
          We argue that the representation, revision, and refraction of existing heritage narratives, which these projects assert through the lenses of both feminist theory and embodied knowledge, are useful iterations which problematise the construction of gender in dominant cultural discourses. 
        Speaker: Dr. t s Beall (Kinning Park Complex / Independent artist and researcher)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Anthropologists confront the illiberal predicament (Commission on Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology): P 6.1

      Room 1.44

      Lots has been written about the upsurge of populist and neonationalist politics in the Global North – and parts of the Global South (and Global East). Neoliberal globalization, “dead but dominant” (Neil Smith) a decade ago, is producing its own nemesis in a slow motion collapse. The collapse is not driven by the Left alter-globalism of the early 21stcentury. We see powerful new Right wing forces and illiberal popular developments that appear either repetitions of earlier authoritarian populisms or may look as new hybrid left-right illiberalisms. The collapse is threatening to take established political frameworks, old party systems, and systems of international relations down with it. The EU is fracturing along regional lines and the domestic alliances that have been supportive of it are cracking. Of course, everything is contested fiercely and countercurrents seem at some places to be gaining strength at the same time. Volatility rules. What has anthropology to offer in terms of analysis, comparison, and intellectual support for those concerned about equality, democracy, global peace and the environment? Which analyses can we offer our colleagues in post socialist Central and Eastern Europe, a region that has been generating some of the most electorally powerful illiberalisms. What can others learn from them? Which role do force fields of capital, class, gender, ethnicity, the nation and religion play in the generation, contestation, and further consolidation of these authoritarian populisms and avowed illiberalisms?
      Conveners: Dr. Don Kalb (University of Bergen, Utrecht University), Dr. Ida Susser (CUNY)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.44
      • 11:00 The Gilets Jaunes: what kind of social movement? 20'
        In Europe, traditional political parties have been challenged and reconfigured while in some cases new parties have been constructed both on the left and the right more rapidly than at any time in the post World War II era. Polarization between the right and the left is increasing and long held social values are being contested. There has been much analysis of changing global relations and political economy that may have led to these shifts, but there is still a need to understand the social transformation in the practice of democracy that may be occurring. As part of on an ongoing ethnography of urban social movements, this paper examines the controversies surrounding the Gilets Jaunes in France, in an effort to analyze the impact and significance of such alternative possibly democratic processes in this polarizing moment. . This movement began in the fall of 2018 and continues. They have been seen by many of their participants as a progressive movement but they have refused identification with any political party. Some observers have feared that, although they focus on income and oppose the neo-liberal policies of Emanuel Macron that they may represent an opening for the right. An ethnographic approach to social movements on the left as well as those which may not be allows for an analysis of the popular pressures that have led to new movements in both Europe and the United States.
        Speaker: Dr. Ida Susser (Hunter College/Graduate Center/ CUNY)
      • 11:20 Everyday authoritarianism: on the illiberal workings of the liberal British state 20'
        Moral outrage over the rise of the far-right has often started from the premise that we ought to consider the ‘illiberalism’ of voter-choices: the choices of the supposedly mal-informed, bigoted and even racist citizen-voter. Similarly, within the anthropology of the populist moment, the lens of analysis has often been centred on the structures of feelings and sentiments of those who feel left behind. However, such perspectives ought to be placed within the context of a different kind of illiberalism that those at the margins confront: the illiberalism of state-led policies that have acted in insidious ways on the intimate processes of social reproduction of working class populations. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic research on a British council estate, this paper uncovers the legacies of what I call an ‘everyday authoritarianism’ that has marked daily relations between citizens and the state. Everyday authoritarianism not only exposes the self-referential terms of liberal narratives that have too easily invoked notions of immanence and crisis. It also identifies the dire need for a radically different narrative of change that moves beyond political narratives of vulnerability and victimhood that have recently seen a come-back in British policy making.
        Speaker: Dr. Insa Koch (LSE)
      • 11:40 What is Authoritarian Neoliberalism and What Came Before It?: The Case of the United States 20'
        The concept of “authoritarian neoliberalism” has gained currency recently to gloss the anti-democratic reconfiguration of governing practices in the wake of the 2007-2008 global economic meltdown (Bruff 2013). In my paper, I want to consider the extent to which this term is useful for getting at what exactly is going on in the United States in the current conjuncture. Specifically, I want to consider two questions: Was neoliberalism in the United States always authoritarian and if not when did it become so? And is Trumpism a form of authoritarian neoliberalism or is it better glossed with another term like authoritarian plutocracy or illiberal authoritarianism, or authoritarian populism with white nationalist characteristics? I ask these questions because I think that they help to advance a conjunctural analysis of the rise of Trumpism in the 21st century United States, and to help us to think about different kinds of authoritarianism and different kinds of liberalism at play in the multiplicity of political forces, projects, and desires that circulate in US politics and culture in the present. 
        Speaker: Dr. Jeff Maskovsky (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
      • 12:00 Reflections on the Futures of Fascism 20'
        Nearly for a decade, we are witnessing an uneven rise of authoritarian politics on a planetary scale. On the other hand, opposition is clumsy and disconcerting. In the face of deepening crisis of capitalism, this paper discusses the success of authoritarian politics as the failure of left and workers movement rather the opposite. This failure has been posited as the coupling of two illusions respectively identified by Daniel Bensaïd and Marx: The perpetual lack of insistence to construct a political alternative against capitalism (“social illusion”) coupled with incessant calls from the left to restore liberal-democratic norms (“political illusion”) dissolves the radical claims within the confines of liberal democracy and fortifies the appeal of lower classes to authoritarian demagogy that historically presents itself as anti-establishment. In this sense, there is a strong resemblance between the eve of fascist catastrophe and contemporary authoritarianisms. Here, we also observe that diverse critical frameworks explaining contemporary authoritarianisms implicitly propose restoring liberal order and disguise this dangerous liaison.
          
          Borrowing from Enzo Traverso, this paper is composed of two parts: “History in the present” and “Present as history”. First, it makes a survey of contemporary approaches built upon concepts such as “authoritarian populism”, “illiberal democracy”, “Bonapartism” and tries to uncover their modalities of thinking with the help of essential classics written on fascism by Benjamin, Trotsky and Daniel Guerin in late 1930s. Secondly, it discusses an ethnographic fieldwork on low-wage workers of Istanbul, Turkey to reflect on future possibilities by scrutinizing contemporary traits of today’s authoritarian slide.
        Speaker: Aykut Kilic (Bogazici University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Climate Change, Food and Water Security of the Marginalized Communities Globally [Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid and Commission on Anthropology and Environment]: P 12.1

      Room 3.136

      Our planet is under several kinds of major threats, including severe climate change and wanton destruction of the natural environment. Globally, there is increasing spread of inequality, along with severe poverty among the marginalized a large part of it due to anthropogenic causes driven by corporate greed and escalating violence. Mere survival for the poor and marginalized is rapidly becoming a critical problem. Potable water is disappearing in many areas of the world, and malnutrition is becoming the norm in some areas. Even within the same community and family there is increasing internal discrimination based on gender, age and other factors, making some people extremely vulnerable. At the macro level, increasing right-wing conservatism is making negative impacts as neoliberal economic policies are spreading. Social/cultural factors and political and economic policies are both threatening the environment and making discrimination increasingly prevalent. This panel invites papers based on empirical data highlighting these issues and dealing with their complexities such as intersection of gender, race, caste and ethnicity with problems of poverty and livelihood. Papers from the Third World and marginal communities like the indigenous people are especially welcome. Climate change, neo-liberal economic policies and the increasing impact of political conservatism on the environment, poor people and marginal regions of the world need to be highlighted and there is need for a dialogue between those interested in sustainability and a viable future for the coming generations not only of humans but of all species.
      Conveners: Dr. Subhadra Channa (Delhi University), Dr. Joan Mencher (CUNY), Dr. Saakshi Joshi (Center for Science and Environment (CSE))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.136
      • 11:00 Solidarity with Salmon: the tragic fish-kill of 2002 in the Lower Klamath River  20'
        In 2002 over 30,000 dead salmon washed up on the banks of the Lower Klamath River. The unprecedented mass fish-kill had been predicted to happen by Native American biologists. They had argued for some time that the five dams built on the river had created a hostile and unhealthy environment for the salmon. Finally in 2002, their warnings turned to reality as the low water levels and rising water temperatures resulted in thousands of salmon deaths. The vocal protests of the local Native people were ignored by the Bush Administration who deemed the local non-Native farmers’ need for extra irrigation water in the drought of 2001 a more important concern than the salmon. For the Native tribes of the Klamath River Basin, the event was more than a news story or a scientific scenario worthy of study it was a tribal tragedy. Salmon are not only a staple food source for the tribe, but also hold a deep spiritual and cultural value to the community as well. In my work I analyze the role a community-based play called "Salmon Is Everything" by Theresa May played in helping to document the incident and to amplify the voices of the Native people involved. "Salmon Is Everything" has been featured in numerous public readings, utilized in academic settings as an example of eco-drama, and remains a valuable model for building solidarity among diverse groups through art.
        Speaker: Dr. Anna Dulba-Barnett (University of Oregon)
      • 11:20 Gendered effects of climate change on the villages on the upper Himalayan border region 20'
        This paper discusses the ethnographic material collected from the upper Himalayans vilalges with a mixed economy of subsistence agriculture, pastoral activities and trade. Over centuries the people here had adapted to the fragile ecosystem by a mixture of social, cultural and technological practices interwoven with eac other. Over the past couple of decades the effects of global warming are making their effects felt, affecting travel routes, agricultural practices and pastoralism,with consequent effects of social, cultural and economic life as well as affecting ritual practices and power fields. The effects are naturally gendered because of sexual division of labour and the differentiated relations that men and women have with the social and natural world. The stories are about both resilience and despair and indicate the ongoing battle that villagers are engaging in their struggle for survival in their region that they also consider their own landscape of belonging and sacredness.
        Speaker: Subhadra Channa (Delhi University)
      • 11:40 Socio-environmental strategies to strengthen resilience of women migrant workers in the Reconquista River Basin, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 20'
        A 2008 United Nations report states that climate change is not gender neutral as women are more negatively affected by its impacts. Taking this into account, our proposal is based on a participatory action research that explores the local reality faced by thousands of migrant women workers in the lower territories of the Reconquista River Basin, north-west of the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This basin is one of the most polluted areas of Argentina, housing both migrants and the largest open-air dump in the country (the CEAMSE) located in the municipal district of General San Martín. Thus, the work of many women and their families - mostly migrants - takes place in the CEAMSE open dump. This rather lugubrious and unhealthy work of selecting and removing garbage represents a set of socio- environmental strategies developed by women in the area to cope with the social reproduction of their family nuclei. The responsibilities of their livelihoods fall mainly on the women themselves who also take care of the children and families. The aim of the research is to analyze the extent to which climate change determined women’s migration to the Reconquista Area (RA); before examining the impact of intersectionality (class, ethnicity, gender) socio-environmental and climate-based realities on their capacity to fully exercise their rights over resources and decision making.
        Speaker: Dr. Natalia Gavazzo (CONICET-IDAES/UNSAM)
      • 12:00 The Water Rights-Based Legal Mobilization of the Wayúu against the Cercado Dam: An Effective Avenue for Court-Centered Lawfare from Below? 20'
        Objective/Context: In recent years, decreasing water availability, accessibility, and quality in the Upper and Middle Guajira has led to the death of thousands of Wayúu people. This has been caused by precipitation deficit and droughts and hydro-colonization by mining and hydropower projects. This study assesses the effectiveness of the Wayúu’s legal mobilization to redress the widespread violation of their fundamental rights on the basis of the enforceability and justiciability of the human right to water. 
          Methodology: The study assesses the effects of the Wayúu’s legal mobilization by following the methodological approach proposed by Siri Gloppen, which addresses lawfare from below strategies from two dimensions: in the narrow sense of winning cases in courts, and in the broader sense of changing public policies, strengthening social protest and placing a social problem at the center of public debates. The study of the enforceability and justiciability of the human right to water from this approach enables a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of legal mobilizations. 
          Conclusions: The effects of the Wayúu’s legal mobilization paint a mixed picture: largely successful regarding court responses, but largely unsuccessful in terms of government implementation of court decisions. Even if the Wayúu’s legal mobilization has brought about public policy changes, the measures adopted have been insufficient and many Wayúu children are dying through reduced water availability, accessibility, and quality. However, strategic alliances forged by the Wayúu have opened a window of opportunity to redress the situation: the declaration of the unconstitutional state of affairs by the Constitutional Court.
        Speaker: Sergi Vidal Parra (University of Deusto)
    • 12:45 - 13:45 IUAES EC & WCAA OC meeting

      Room 1.63

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.63
    • 12:45 - 13:45 Lunch Break
    • 12:45 - 13:45 Book Launch: 1
      Location: room: 2.4
      • 12:45 Mutual Impact: Conflict, Tension and Cooperation in Opole Silesia 1h0'
        Edited by Petr Skalník. Wroclaw:
        University of Wroclaw, 2018.
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Anthropologists confront the illiberal predicament (Commission on Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology): P 6.2

      Room 1.44

      Lots has been written about the upsurge of populist and neonationalist politics in the Global North – and parts of the Global South (and Global East). Neoliberal globalization, “dead but dominant” (Neil Smith) a decade ago, is producing its own nemesis in a slow motion collapse. The collapse is not driven by the Left alter-globalism of the early 21stcentury. We see powerful new Right wing forces and illiberal popular developments that appear either repetitions of earlier authoritarian populisms or may look as new hybrid left-right illiberalisms. The collapse is threatening to take established political frameworks, old party systems, and systems of international relations down with it. The EU is fracturing along regional lines and the domestic alliances that have been supportive of it are cracking. Of course, everything is contested fiercely and countercurrents seem at some places to be gaining strength at the same time. Volatility rules. What has anthropology to offer in terms of analysis, comparison, and intellectual support for those concerned about equality, democracy, global peace and the environment? Which analyses can we offer our colleagues in post socialist Central and Eastern Europe, a region that has been generating some of the most electorally powerful illiberalisms. What can others learn from them? Which role do force fields of capital, class, gender, ethnicity, the nation and religion play in the generation, contestation, and further consolidation of these authoritarian populisms and avowed illiberalisms?
      Conveners: Dr. Don Kalb (University of Bergen, Utrecht University), Dr. Ida Susser (CUNY)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.44
      • 13:45 From anticommunism through neoliberalism to populism: the logic of the trajectory in Central Europe 20'
        The postsocialist transformation in Central Europe was not a unilinear process that has led away from the authoritarian system to democratic rules granting individual freedoms. The argument is made that the social exclusion based on class order established thanks to the existing ‘global hierarchy of value’ and cultural hegemony played an important role in shaping postsocialist processes. In the process known as ‘intellectual containment’, a class of ‘losers’ has been invented. Many discriminated groups of people felt excluded from the modernization of society. Degraded materially and symbolically by the neoliberal system turned to rightist and nationalist values seen as a shelter capable to guard them against dangers brought by neoliberalism, globalisation and cosmopolitanism. They were joined by some members of the newly formed middle class whose aspirations have not been fulfilled. Cultural fear has been mixed with cultural fundamentalism as well as with – at least in some cases – with ‘phantom Islamophobia’ incited by the “refugee crisis”. All of these reason combined have boosted xenophobia. A strengthening of the populist agenda ultimately has a class background. How rightist and populist programmes manage to dupe postsocialist subjects disappointed with neoliberalism asks for critical anthropological insights. 
        Speaker: Prof. Michał Buchowski (Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan)
      • 14:05 Illiberalism in Hungary: successes and contradictions of the "work-based society" 20'
        In the last years scholars and the wider public have focused on the authoritarian features of illiberal regimes. While an attention to practices that marginalize, discipline and control dissenting social groups and oppositional forces is warranted, I find the case for authoritarianism overstated and the use of umbrella terms like ‘authoritarian neoliberalism’ potentially problematic. Coercion plays an important role in generating coveted parliamentary supermajorities and in protecting capital accumulation from popular mobilizations. An overemphasis on coercion, however, conceals the fact that illiberal elites have introduced policies that enjoy widespread support. In this paper I will rely on my earlier work in rural Hungary to show that citizens credited the Fidesz party for restoring the moral order and redressing what were widely considered as excesses of liberal governance. I argue that the flagship public works program generated support for the ruling party in the critical 2010-2014 period. While this program exhibits disciplinary and coercive characteristics, it also contributed toward the reintegration of surplus populations into local communal fabrics. In the last part of the paper I shift my attention to the contemporary period and argue that Fidesz has been much less successful in finding a sustainable solution to one of the chronic problems of dependent capitalism: flexible accumulation in the export-oriented manufacturing sector, which is placing increasing strains on the social reproduction of working-class households and possibly eroding Fidesz’s legitimacy. I end by suggesting that this contradiction in Hungary’s “work-based” socio-political model is worth examining more closely in the future.
        Speaker: Dr. Kristof Szombati (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
      • 14:25 "The Great Purge:" Law and State and Class Formation in Post-Cold War Authoritarian Populisms 20'
        The great purge"" has been a word that is coined to refer to the 1930s purges that took place across Europe, especially in Stalinist Russia. The 1930s are today also invoked to make sense of the ongoing ""crisis"" liberal-democracy, neoliberal capitalism, and the rise of authoritarian nationalist populisms in the East/South and the North. In conversation with these invocations of the 1930s, my paper explores how the recent/ongoing purges of public workers (academics, judges, civil servants etc) may be seen as part of a continuum of state making and class transformation that has taken place in Europe's periphery. By developing an internationalist and historical materialist understanding of the purges, which are often invoked as state security, popular justice, and/or moral purity and cleansing, my paper aims to highlight the way the shifting blocs of political power, class inequality, and different forms of dispossession and disenfranchisement, largely an effect of uneven international relations, are harnassed and articulated by authoritarian populist groups as a crisis of national sovereignty and reproduction, which would be overcome by the (permanent) purges. Thereby, the purges also raise questions about the role of the law and constitution or de-constitution of solidarity relations, and the mechanisms of enemy-making and conspiratorial thinking that define authoritarian formations. 
        Speaker: Saygun Gokariksel (Bogazici University)
      • 14:45 Dispossession, devaluation, and the (un-)making of authoritarian populism 20'
        This paper examines the role that various forms of dispossession – economic, political, social – play in the making and possibly unmaking of authoritarian populism in Turkey. Turkey in the last decade was characterized by a revaluation of social-political relations and established hierarchies, based on a claim of diametrically opposed values in the population, which went hand in hand with the assembling of new riches. This process of revaluation was ratcheted up since the summer of 2015, with the renewed violence in the Southeast, and in the aftermath of the failed coup of 2016. The paper examines in particular how decree law – framed as anti-terror measure – was used as a tool for dispossession of oppositional groups as well as former allies of the regime and in this way as a means to shore up the current hegemonic project of authoritarian populism. It points here to a possible contradiction: while dispossession, in its various forms, is contributing to the alliance-formation at the heart of the current hegemonic project and its attempts to re-make the state, it also feeds into economic instabilities and an increase in international tensions that that might undermine it in the mid- to long run. Much of this will depend on the success of the current regime in managing the various forms of (de-)valuation that have characterized Turkish politics in the past years to maintain ""active consent"" (Hall 1988) of both dominant and subordinate groups in the alliance.
        Speaker: Dr. Katharina Bodirsky (University of Konstanz and University of Bergen)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Ambivalent Solidarities and Fiscal Reciprocities: P 5.2

      Room 3.106

      Human societies have been constructing social solidarity beyond kin groups for many millennia. States have continuously expanded their capacities to extract resources from their subjects. From whom such revenues are collected and for whose benefit they are used is the outcome of political processes in which considerations of justice and morality are central. The study of taxation therefore engages with multiple key relations: between equity and efficiency; state and market; private property and collective goods; individual and society. We invite ethnographically informed proposals that address the ethical foundations of taxation policies as they are actually implemented. What is considered fair taxation and notions of who is deserving of support vary greatly. In Scandinavia, strong welfare states were formed on the basis of reciprocity and shared norms of compliance. The bulk of revenue came from taxing individual income in progressive fashion. The state socialism of the Soviet bloc, by contrast, emphasized redistribution via central planning. Individual incomes were more equal and their taxation did not play a significant role. How can postsocialist states replicate the accomplishments of their erstwhile rivals in the West? Or, in the era of neoliberalism, digitization, and experiments with new institutions such as the share economy, is the taxation-based welfare state no longer a viable model even in its former strongholds? What new varieties of state-society-citizen relations formed through taxation might offer alternative forms of solidarity across the boundaries of social class and between different types of taxpayer?
      Conveners: Dr. Chris Hann (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology), Dr. Lotta Björklund Larsen (University of Exeter Business School)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.106
      • 13:45 "Help us find tax cheaters!" Informing on neighbors in Scandinavia 20'
        Taxation is both an economic necessity for the welfare state and a moral relationship between the citizen and the state fiscal authorities. States can therefore decide how vigilant they should be in collecting certain kinds of taxes and in identifying tax cheaters or people obtaining illegitimate welfare benefits. Scandinavian welfare states are based on a homogenous idea of a collective, where everyone should bear “their fair burden” of tax payment. While it may be socially acceptable to cheat on some kinds of tax (through black work or cigarette smuggling), communities also have limits based on some kind of scale of indignation. Scandinavian tax and welfare authorities now solicit help from citizens in identifying those who either do not pay their fair share of taxes, fail to report extra income, or are receiving illegitimate welfare benefits. Citizens can now inform the authorities or upload photos, effectively becoming a neighborly surveillance arm. Using data from Denmark and Sweden, this paper problematizes these new informing practices, and how people navigate between neighborly solidarity, indignation at illicitly wealthy neighbors, use of digital surveillance to take revenge and civic duty towards the collective.
        Speaker: Dr. Steven Sampson (Lund University)
      • 14:05 Failed reciprocities: how (self-)exclusion from public social insurance undermines acceptance of taxes. 20'
        The contribution will shed light on two mechanisms which undermine small business owners’ acceptance of taxes in East Germany. The tax system and the different public social insurance systems are – by and large – not related to each other; but many small business owners make a connection between these systems. For understanding the first mechanism, it is important to note that around three quarters of firms in Germany are either sole proprietorships or partnerships. In contrast to corporations, owners of these firms do not pay the flat corporation tax (15%), but their profits are taxed like any other income with the progressive income tax (up to 42%). However, owners of these firms do not feel like employees with a ‘normal’ income. They emphasize that in case of business failure they do not receive unemployment benefits (for which they actually do not and cannot make contributions), and are personally liable with their private possessions. The second mechanism refers to their status in the public pension and health care schemes. In these systems they are treated as ‘self-employed persons’. Because the conditions applied to them are perceived as worse than in private insurances, many of them switch to the latter. In both mechanisms, the (self-)exclusion from public social insurances seems to undermine the acceptance of taxes. By strengthening a meaning of self-employment as the ability to care for oneself in every sphere of one’s life, these mechanisms reduce the willingness to pay taxes for the benefit of the state or others.
        Speaker: Dr. Sylvia Terpe (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
      • 14:25 Distributive aggrievement, ambivalent moral community and the memory of migration in Catalonia 20'
        In liberal redistributive systems, separate categories of beneficiaries and taxpayers are usually created, and the deservingness of the former is questioned especially when it is perceived as an outsider to the ‘moral community’, to the people to whom one feels moral commitments and solidarity. This article addresses this issue from the perspective of interregional redistribution at the state level, which in the case of Catalonia has remained a popular perception that expands beyond the pro-independence movement. This article makes an ethnographical approximation of the sons and daughters of migrants from the south of Spain living in a working-class neighborhood of Barcelona. In spite of the logical plurality of visions, a recurrent story stands out in which the subsidized ""good life"" in their parents’ Southern communities of origin, offered in personal testimony, contrasts with (and to a large extent is explained by) the ""hard life"" in productive Barcelona. This popular narrative of distributive aggrievement (that fits into the local political ecosystem) has undermined class dialectics and politics within Catalonia while re-scaling the perception of distributive injustice to a primarily state level, largely as an interregional issue. However, this distributive malaise gains a special relevance when framed by the memory of parents’ migration (which is largely a memory of urbanization), since it plays a significant role in my interlocutors’ self-understanding. This private rather than public memory has ambivalent consequences because it highlights and, at the same time, denies the moral blaming of relatives and 'countrymen'.
        Speaker: Dr. Mikel Aramburu (Universitat de Barcelona)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Critiques of Political Economy and Alternative Global Futures: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual Ecology: P 17.2

      Room 3.135

      The panel focuses the following main points: -Genealogies of Political Economy as a Critical Perspective: A Critical History and Struggle for Alternative Futures -Limits and Possibilities of Critiques of Political Economy: From Marx to Picketty -Critique of Political Economy and the Calling of Ecology: Limits of Production, Consumption and Paths of Biological and Cultural Regenereration -With and Beyond Critiques of Political Economy: Moral Economy, Moral Sociology and Spiritual Ecology -Dimensions of Moral Economy: From Aristotle to Sahlins (Marshall Sahlins, The Stone Age Economics), Mauss (Marcel Mauss, Gift), Gandhi and Kumarappa -Moral Sociology -Spiritual Ecology
      Conveners: Dr. Ananta Kumar Giri (Madras Institute of Development Studies), Dr. Abdulkadir Osman Farah (Aalborg University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.135
      • 13:45 Deities, entrepreneurs, and the state: sacred economy of mineral resources in South Siberia 20'
        This paper discusses how local philosophies and cultural idioms of informal economy based on illegal gathering of mineral resources in South Siberia. The main focus of preplanned fieldwork is Okinskii and Tunkinskii regions of Buriatiia Republic (Eastern Saint mountainous chain). The methodological ground of this project takes its course from a conflict of approaches to regional mineral resources relevant to different interested groups and actors such as local administrators, both private and state mining industries, and local communities whose living strategies are based on small scale illegal extractions of mineral resources.
          The outlook of both state and private mining companies represents the pragmatic orientation on bowels of the earth. Local population, by way of contrast, has a different kind of view which is of a sacred nature: resources belong to mountainous deities who allow or not allow people to harvesting them.
          This local concept fulfills in a complex network of social hierarchies and reciprocity, where main actors are true owners of minerals - deities. Deities decide what and how to give to people in exchange for respect and rituals, therefore, people have to know how to be liked by supernatural powers and communicate with them successfully. Hence, minerals are not passive parts of the earth’s treasury; yet, they are active and sacred conglomerates of animated landscape.
        Speaker: Dr. Veronika Beliaeva-Sachuk (Centre of Arctic and Siberian Exploration, The Sociological Institute, Russian Academy od Science)
      • 14:05 The moral economy of an electric vehicle as the semi-periphery of the global system 20'
        The paper discusses a new strategy of the Polish government to develop an electric vehicle as a Polish product from a perspective of a moral economy. The project of EV is entangled into a set of agendas, such as climate action, air pollution reduction, modernization through technological innovation, coal-based economy and national pride, all of which are to be brought together through the infrastructure for electro mobility. The paper examines political, business, activists’ and expert discourses about electro mobility in Poland to understand the underlying imaginaries of the future, of the Polish state and broader moral projects that unfold in these visions. Special attention is paid to discursive strategies of reconciling potential frictions and contradictions that appear at the background of the European and global discourses on EV, climate change and energy transition.
        Speaker: Dr. Aleksandra Lis (Adam Mickiewicz University)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Indigenous Museum, Objects, Cultural Heritage and Reconnaissance Policies [Commission on Museums and Cultural Heritage-COMACH]: P 27.2

      Room 3.130

      Cultural heritage is the main theme of this panel which intends to discuss the relationship between property rights of artifacts, but also territory and resources and stories about the mediators of knowledge, including ethics, politics and stories of recognition, as well as their potential of the transformation of museum practices of indigenous peoples, based on recent experiences in traditional museum institutions. The presentations will address issues related to Amerindian collections, analyzing cultural heritage strategies linked to these objects and issues related to broader claims of indigenous peoples' rights. It also aims to discuss recent experiences with conservation practices and exhibitions, promoting debate in venues where current museum discussions are blurring the traditional perception between ethnographic and art museums. The purpose of this panel is also to create a dialogue between museum professionals and Amerindians peoples by examining the dimensions of intrinsic ethics and politics, and stories of recognition often overlooked in current museum practices.
      Conveners: Dr. Renato Athias (UFPE), Dr. Alexandre Gomes (NEPE/UFPE), Dr. Pascale De Robert (IRD/France)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.130
      • 13:45 Listening to murmurs of the museum's reserves. A colaborative research in Amazonian colections (COLAM/OPUS project) 20'
        The Colam/OPUS research project aims a multidisciplinary and multicultural perspectives on Amazonian collections in French and Brazilian museums. We discuss constitution, circulation, patrimonialisation and trajectories of museums collections as well as their signification in local terms. What motivates, here or there, before or now, collectionning objects? How many meetings, exchanges ans tales or known stories for a set of things turns recognized as 'heritage'? The paper describes some episodes of a collective trip occurred in France in may 2018, with students, academics and indigenous researchers working together. Choosing examples between crossed conversations and narratives about patrimonial objects in our COLAM trip, we analyse the meanings of shared documentation trying to listen new stories for old things, and discuss about the intangible side of material culture. Can we improve our pratices in participatory research when understanding the feeling of loneliness of a feather headdress, or the suffering of thirst for an old necklace? How could we write the emotions and feelings of material things? A greater role for oral tradition but also literature(s) and cinema in museums could be a way to reconcile the many voices recognized in each heritage object or collection. This paper is a result of a collective work and is signed by seventeen academics and non-academics authors from Brasil and France.
        Speaker: Dr. Pascale de Robert (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement)
      • 14:05 Indigenous Museums, Ethnic Mobilizations and Cosmopolithics of Memory. 20'
        The union of terms defining the creation processes of museums of native peoples is something already globally widespread among scientific enviroments and participants to indigenous movements. Also called tribal museums and ethnic museums, we problematize here the concept of indigenous museum together with the analysis of data and processes lived during a long term field research based on a participant observation into the universe of museological questions experienced from indigenous populations in Brazil. This oral comunication wants to illustrate the results collected in the first anthropological PhD thesis produced in the country on indigenous museums. Its purpose is that of understanding the relationship between memory and ethnicity through the appropriation and translation of museums within indigenous peoples etnhic mobilizations and cosmological dynamics, starting from data and empirical situations colleced during an ethnography realized between 2006 and 2018, whose first experience was that of Museus dos Kanindé de Aratuba (State of Ceará, Northeast area). We try to formulate concepts suitable to anthropological study of indigenous museums, starting from the notions of ethnomuseography, indigenous museological action, appropriation and translation, used as analitycal toolkit in order to comprehend the processes of indigenization of museums and of resignification of terms such as “heritage” and “culture” during the construction of self-representations related to cosmopolithics of memories during indigenous museums processes.
        Speaker: Dr. Alexandre Gomes (Federal University of Pernambuco)
      • 14:25 The indigenous museum “Mia Maria”: ethnic claim and heritage construction 20'
        In october 2016 the exponents of the indigenous populations Tabajara and Tapuio of the comunity of Nazaré (Lagoa de São Francisco, Piauí-BR) created the Museu Indígena ‘Mia Maria’ following an increasing phenomenon in Brazil about the construction of indigenous museums. In the Northeast area they represent an instrument to support the process of ethnic emergency: in the State of Piauí several local comunities started to claim for their indigenous identity for few years, joining others groups in the participation to exchanges, events, activities and forums. The museum in Nazaré was built after the participation of some members of the comunity to the II Fórum Nacional de Museus Indígenas do Brasil (august 2016, Kapinawa people/Pernambuco). The appropriation of the museological space, both phisical and conceptual, appeared as a good way to represent the local indigenous identity promoting those aspects concerning the resignification of past memories and experiences. These include material and immaterial culture linked to traditional knowledges and ethnical distinction and bring the museum out of its phisical structure – where the collection is preserved and exposed – to other places into the space claimed to be part of an indigenous area. This extension of the notion of museum is important not only to reinforce the connection between an indigenous identity and the territory it is produced on, but also to better display the complementariety of material and immaterial aspects of what is thought to be indigenous heritage in order for the group to be recognised as ethnical and political subject.
        Speaker: Anna Bottesi (Università degli Studi di Torino)
      • 14:45 Problems and Perspectives on Amazonian Shamanic Objects in Ethnographic Museums in Europe and in the USA 20'
        There are many ethnographic objects of the upper Rio Negro indigenous peoples exhibited in museums of this indigenous territory of the Uaupés basin. For this presentation I seek to explore issues that are at the interface of museology and ethnology to discribe and analyze the trajectories and displacements of objects that have shamanistic characteristics and that were part of significant mythological narratives among the Rio Negro Indigenous groups. The questions will be highlighted after analyzing a set of selected objects for the debate on ethnographic objects and shamanism in the upper Rio Negro today. This work of documentation on these objects is being carried out in a collaborative way with the local people and is subsidizing discussions and important texts of the indigenous students of the intercultural licenciatura in this region. It is intended with this documentation to organize a virtual exhibition with these objects and thus to provoke a virtual restitution of the indigenous objects in museums that are outside this immense region.
        Speaker: Dr. Renato Athias (NEPE/UFPE)
      • 15:05 Ethical links between the forest and the museum 20'
        Dialoging between anthropology and art history, I seek to analyze the resonance of Yanomami culture in contemporary art. The objective is understanding the ways of exposing this culture, its impact on the struggle for the preservation of their territory and the recognition of this group.
          
          First of all, I propose an analysis of the photographic work of Claudia Andujar, who lived for many years among the Yanomami and artworks of the exhibition "Yanomami: the spirit of the forest" (2003), during which a group of artists developed multiple artworks after their contact with the Yanomami. In a second moment, these analyzes will be combined with elements of my own fieldwork among the Yanomami in which I sought the perspective of those local artists who had their artworks presented in these exhibitions. The aim is to discuss the local re-appropriations of the use of these new visual languages, drawings and videos; and how they make sense for the Yanomami people, leading them to their own forms of representation, expression and figuration.
          
          I intend to raise the ethical issues surrounding these productions a to understand how the uses of images have been modified in a society that did not have a visual arts production as a record, in contrast, it has rituals that eliminate the artifacts connected to the memory of the people when they die. This all while being confronted with a figurative society and establishing its history and memory in physical documentation and visual images.
        Speaker: Lilian Papini (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS))
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Lands of the Extracto-cene: The Extractive Industries, Climate Change and Mobile Pastoralists [Commission for Nomadic Peoples]: P 29.2

      Room 2.124

      In the traditional territories of mobile pastoralists around the world, there is a form of land use that is expanding its reach with the help of new technologies and innovations in engineering, alongside a global hyper-consumerism that makes natural resources like copper, gold, natural gas and rare earths essential for the production of ‘modern’ livelihoods and technologies. The UNEP showns that global mineral extraction increased threefold in the last forty years; this trend is projected to continue in decades to come (UNEP 2016). Amongst scholars, there have been a number of studies focused on mining and mobile pastoralists, namely in Mongolia, Oman, the Arctic and Africa, but dialogue on the issues as it relates to the broader challenges faced by pastoralists remains few and far between. We aim to bring together experts working on extractive industries and mobile pastoralism globally in order to advance the scholarship in this emerging field. We examine forms of co-existence between mobile pastoralists and the extractive industries in regions where mobile animal husbandy was historically the dominate form of land use. In what ways do pastoralists adapt, resist, ignore or work with the new land users in these territories? How does the cumulative impacts of climate change and extraction impact pastoralists? How does the expansion and intensification of extraction relate with ongoing social and environmental change amongst mobile peoples? We invite papers to take a holistic approach to studying how pastoralist societies act upon the accumulation of environmental change and extractive industries in their lands.
      Conveners: Dr. Ariell Ahearn-Ligham (Oxford University), Dr. Bruce Forbes (University of Lapland)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.124
      • 13:45 (Dis)integrations? Mining and Narratives of State Legitimacy in the Gobi 20'
        This paper examines narratives of environmental governance, climate change and the State amongst mobile pastoralists related to mega mining infrastructure projects. In particular, it engages with qualitative research to examine transformations in the social and physical landscape in the South Gobi region where the Oyu Tolgoi mega mine is based, and how these narratives of change feature in two official complaints lodged by local mobile pastoralists against the mine. As one of the largest open pit copper mines in the world located 80 km from the border with China, Oyu Tolgoi is an important source of future revenues for the Mongolian government. As the national scale, this investment has enabled the government to perform certain narratives of statehood and independence from neighboring China. Herder's concerns around their rights to use natural resources and their demand that the mine performs as a good environmental citizen goes largely unanswered by state authorities, and this conflict is mediated by an international organization. At the local scale, state legitimacy becomes much more fractured and uneven as international agencies and even the mine itself are see to play a more effective role in local land use management and monitoring.
        Speaker: Dr. Ariell Ahearn-Ligham (University of Oxford)
      • 14:05 Uranium and tuareg in niger 20'
        In Niger there are diverse underground resources in nomadic regions in the north: oil, gold and uranium. French company in cooperation with Nigerien state exploits uranium and the town of Arlit was constructed. Ten years ago president at the time offered permissions to research to many international companies. By now, Chinese company already finished their job in Azelik and left ecological disaster behind them. At the same time old and new companies are offering their Corporate social responsibility projects.
          Uranium is in the region of diverse Tuareg nomad sections and villages. Also for nomads form greater part of Niger this vast territory is crucial in time of summer salty pasture. All this land is under the Pastoral zone jurisdiction where it is officially forbidden to own the land, but the state interests are always a priority. In the region, nomads are trying to keep access to pastures and have some control over territory in administrative ways including sedentarisation, but no rights are guaranteed for those coming seasonally. There are other Tuareg actors supporting nomads or having their claims and interests: both rebellions demanded greater share of uranium revenues ; civil society is denouncing ecological catastrophes, while young schooled Tuareg would be happy to get a skilled job in mining projects and certain regional authorities are making efforts to find equilibrium.
        Speaker: Dr. Sarah Lunacek (University of Ljubljana)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Writing for a public of non-anthropologists [Commission on Anthropology and Education]: W 1.2
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.19
      • 13:45 Writing for a public of non-anthropologists [Commission on Anthropology and Education] (Part 2) 1h45'
        The LAB experiments in practice a type of narrative different from the professional ethnographic writing. Creating stories, with a common framework, we want to reach a varied audience of both young people and adults, to entertain, intrigue, surprise, discover, excite and engage non-professionals in the experience of different cultures. Our aim is to encourage, outside the Academy, a more widespread sensitivity towards the figure of the anthropologist: after the workshop, we will publish some significant stories on the web and interact with the school international/national networks and with cultural institutions, eg museums. Activities: Preliminary exchange of information about the field experiences of each participant. Discussion starting from photographs or notes related to a particular episode. Analysis of narrative techniques suited to the goals to be achieved and to the recipients. Examination of multilingual tools and transversal anthropological themes, aimed at overcoming linguistic differences and highlighting commonalities and cultural diversities in the world. Definition of the main idea for some short stories. Verbal and written production (individual or in small groups) of narrative schemes. Study of a possible common frame for the single stories. Requirements: Registration is needed. Participants must have a field experience. We ask them to bring one significant picture, in their own laptop/smartphone/notebook, or a printed photo or some notes related to a particular episode in the field experience of which they were protagonists or witnesses. We suggest them to bring their own laptops or a paper notebook: during the workshop we will train to write short stories.

        Number of participants: 5 - 20
        Duration of the workshop: 210 min
        Pre-registration is required: Yes (Via the registration system)
        Contact to organiser: g.guslini@gmail.com, rpgajeet@gmail.com, sabine.klocke-daffa@ethno.uni-tuebingen.de
        Speakers: Giovanna Guslini ((Formerly) Ministry of Education, University and Research, Intercultural and International Training), Ajeet Jaiswal (Pondicherry University, Department of Anthropology), Sabine Klocke-Daffa (University of Tuebingen, Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies, Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Evoking the intangible. Sensory media, anthropological film and art-based practice in engagements with epistemically challenging phenomena: P 21.2

      Room 3.132

      "Recent decades brought a surge of methodological experiments in anthropology: challenging or reinventing the formula of ethnographic film, embracing the creative possibilities of sensory media, and combining anthropology with art in fusions of creative practice, performance and ethnographic research. Interrelated circumstances necessitate such turn to alternative means of evoking and representing lived realties. For once, paradigmatic shifts in anthropological theory grasping at alternative modalities of being call for renewed encounters with topics that seemed to have been analytically tamed and foreclosed. Second, the need for ontological reframing called upon by acknowledging human and non-human lives in the anthropocene or its imminent wake. Third, the surge in technological developments that prompt existential questions about sentience, subjectivity and agency and ways in which these can be addressed anthropologically. The above description does not foreclose the range of challenges we must face and the means we can face them by employing non-textual or hybrid media. This panel welcomes anthropologists who seek or invent new methods and forms of engagement, contemporary artists and filmmakers drawn to anthropology, and those who operate across and beyond these disciplinary realms and question their boundaries."
      Conveners: Dr. Jan Lorenz (Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy), Dr. Piotr Goldstein (Trinity College Dublin)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.132
      • 13:45 Singing Songs of the Jewish Underworld of Pre-WW2 Poland: Re-telling the story of the urban poor 20'
        After years of silence during the communist rule, since 1989 Jewish culture has been every year more broadly presented in Poland. Today it is most visible through Jewish festivals which take place all over Poland. The most described of them is the Jewish Festival of Cracow. Although greatly popular, the festival (and its surroundings) has attracted a lot of media and academic critique. Concerns are voiced over what seems to be appropriation of Jewish culture by the non-Jewish Poles, kitsch aesthetics of many performances and duplication of stereotypes.
          This presentation is part of my larger project which explores, both theoretically and through singing, songs of Jewish thieves and prostitutes from early 20th century Poland. These songs have been originally collected to bring to light the fate of many from the deprived (Jewish) communities and have been (re-)discovered only recently. In my research, through a series of concerts for Jewish and non-Jewish audiences, I explore the potential which this repertoire has for (re)telling the his/herstory of the Jewish community of Poland, beyond the predominant orientalist, simplified and politicised narratives.
        Speaker: Dr. Izabella Goldstein (The University of Manchester)
      • 14:05 Visualisng the Invisible: using visual ethnography to explore extra-institutional activism of migrants and ethnic minorities 20'
        The project 'Visualising the Invisible' arises from a larger one which appreciates that alongside the most often studied forms of civic activism - engagement in NGOs and social movements - exist a variety of 'everyday activisms' which are different from NGOs in that they do not yearn for donor's money, and from movements in that they do not aim to attract attention. Such activisms are often quiet, slow, invisible or even unconscious and thus remain little visible to academic research or media. Similarly, we found that alongside engagement in key minority/migrant institutions or organisations formally detached from these but still focusing on own-group advocacy and/or promotion of culture, many migrants and members of ethnic minorities are involved in activism for non-minority causes. In such initiatives/groups (co-)run by ethnic minorities/migrants, the origin of members is not necessarily hidden but neither it is highlighted or considered relevant. For instance, Polish is lingua franca at many Vegan Picnics in Manchester, Hungarian within some of the largest cycling advocacy groups in northern Serbia, etc. However, since these initiatives are not concerned with minority/migrant issues but with those relevant to the entire local community, it is unlikely that they would be looked upon in studies or discussions concerned with 'minority/migrant activism' or minority-majority relations.
          
          In this presentation we discuss the challenges of using visual ethnography methods to 'visualise the invisible'. It will include both photographic and video material recorded with migrant Roma 'activist (citizen)' from Kosovo living in Serbia.
        Speaker: Dr. Piotr Goldstein (The University of Manchester)
      • 14:25 Creative approximation. The evocation of sensory experience in introspective media art projects and the question of I-witnessing in sensory ethnography. 20'
        This paper considers the paradigm of audiovisual representation in anthropology as parallel to ethnographic accounts. I will be looking at the media art projects evoking internal sensory experiences that are not a consequence of intersubjective stimuli that could be registered in a documentary fashion. Through a process that I call creative sensory approximation, artist and anthropologists can engage with and evoke instances of human experience that necessitates going beyond the recording of environments and stimuli. The outcome of that process can be a medium of representation which effectively turns subjective bodily condition into an intersubjective experience, offering the public an in-depth insight into a particular condition of being.
        Speaker: Dr. Jan Lorenz (Adam Mickiewicz University)
      • 14:45 Epistemic movement of Ethnography to Method 20'
        What does it mean to reflect on being a participant practitioner of an ethnographic engagement that one had carried out to ethnographizing the participation as a practice of method? My paper would like to present the workings of one particular art/experimental research method project called Zariyein which simultaneously straddled being an art project in its working an execution while also being a method for an ethnographic research exercise. The same project found its way, seven years later into a thesis on methodology which sought to ask how as practitioners of the discipline of sociology/social anthropology do we construct our objects of inquiry? This paper in presenting an ethnography of a method would like to argue how any method, if seen in terms of the way it works itself out, constantly negotiates its own making while trying to unravel the object it seeks to decipher. Positioning my own self as an ethnographer and a participant practitioner and writing on the making of an ethnography as a researcher at a later stage reveals how method adapts itself in creating the object it seeks to unravel as much as an object is constantly shaped and inflected by the method one adopts. The principle being one of mutual constitution. Zariyein as an experimental research/art practice becomes illustrative of this principle and my paper seeks to present this ethnography of a method in retrospect.
        Speaker: Dr. Subhashim Goswami (Shiv Nadar University)
      • 15:05 Dramatizations of ethnographic research as acts of public intervention 20'
        As part of the annual ethnographic and performative laboratory, a group of students (anthropologists, dramaturgists and theater directors) jointly conceptualised, problematised and worked on the project about different masculinities. The assumption of the project was a discussion, negotiation, and exchange of research methods, strategies and ways of exploring social practices by combining ethnography and performativity. The outcome included thirteen interventions, understood as immediate social actions performed in the public space. Based on the annual pedagogical experience of running a laboratory, I problematize the cooperation situation itself (including, the clash of discourses and practices, predicaments of mutual understandings), as well as to problematise the actual potential of ‘research-creation’ and performative ethnography. I argue that the form of laboratory and collaboration between ethnography and performative arts opens not only new opportunities in methodological and pedagogical approach but also has transformative potential. The interventions performed in the public sphere might be understood as new modalities for disseminating research findings, which distort rather static and normative protocols of academic research presentations in Poland. They also allow reaching broader audiences and enabling more critical, intimate and involved understanding of different social and cultural practices.
        Speaker: Dr. Magdalena Sztandara (Jagiellonian University)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Gendered Solidarities, Fragmented Responsibilities: Researchers’ Responses to Challenging Times: P 24.2

      Room 3.46

      Over the last few decades, we have been facing an increasingly complex, messy and contradictory picture of the research field and what it takes to be a researcher in the contemporary world. On the one hand, there is increasing interest in co-creation and action-based methods with growing evidence that research engagement can produce significant shifts in knowledge, which results in beneficial change for communities. On the other hand, familiar patterns of power and discrimination persist in an increasingly interconnected world. We welcome interdisciplinary enquiries, artistic interventions, theoretical and empirical contributions, examining issues of solidarity, mobilising researchers to act for gender equality. Acknowledging that socially constructed bodies respond differently to dominance and subordination, through ambiguity, transgression, rebellion and protest, we seek contributions that engage feminist-inspired framings as a central axis for analysing the researcher and the researched. Tensions between pressures to conform and the need for resistance in the construction of academic writing, moreover, require further reflection from the perspective of our desire for solidarity and our responsibilities in the field. This panel focuses on critical reflections and methodological framings, the ways researchers negotiate their power, agency, and positionality, while transcending the boundaries of social or cultural anthropology, including, but not limited to, the following themes: - intersectional explorations of solidarity, gender and knowledge production - co-creating care - solidarities at the centre and periphery - feminist methods vs post-colonialism - solidarities of feminisms - ‘appropriate’ feminists: engagement, agency and change - solidarity, power and transgression - anthropology of friendship
      Conveners: Prof. Katarzyna Kosmala (University of the West of Scotland), Dr. Anna Sznajder (Polish Ethological Society), Prof. Fiona Hackney (Wolverhampton University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.46
      • 13:45 Gendered Spaces and Bystander Solidarity on the Cairo Metro 20'
        During and following the 18 days of protest against the rule of Hosni Mubarak in 2011, there were spikes in harassment and assault in public spaces, and patrols were formed to combat these incidents. Aware of the importance of bystanders as witnesses and potential interveners to harassment, movements began awareness campaigns in the streets and in the metro. The Cairo metro has specific cars designated ‘women only’, suggesting the existence of a safe public space, but it is common for men to enter these cars, often without consequence.
          
          Based upon PhD research undertaken with an Egyptian anti-sexual harassment movement, this paper demonstrates the importance of solidarity in combating sexual harassment through two contrasting experiences of the Cairo metro that occurred on the same night. As the story unfolds, I reflect upon my own positionality, draw out the importance of support from bystanders in the moment of harassment (Replogle: 2011, Abdelmonem & Galan: 2017), and highlight how shifting notions of public/private and male/female spaces further problematise the push to create safe spaces for women in public. The latter reinforces the need for bystander support, but we are also reminded that women’s rights to public spaces are still subject to mass perception. 
        Speaker: Dr. Sandra Fernandez (University of St Andrews Centre for Minorities Research)
      • 14:05 Reconfiguring past and present through creative research in “A Car for Women and Other Stories” 20'
        “A Car for Women and Other Stories” focuses on pioneering female engineer and car manufacturer Dorothée Pullinger and the ground-breaking training facility for women engineers she helped establish in South-west Scotland. The project combines archival research, site visits, elements of oral history, documentary and song with a connection to pedagogy. The research engages with community and bridging time and place, invoking Freire:
          Every thematic investigation which deepens historical awareness is this really educational, while al authentic education investigates thinking. (1993:90)
          
          The Tongland factory was powered by hydro-electricity and promoted as a modern environment suited to women workers with enhanced recreation facilities. The disused factory and the derelict hydro-electric facility encapsulate the ambition, the partially realised aims and the forgotten endeavour of Galloway enterprise. As Bachelard notes:
          Often it is from the very fact of concentration in the most restricted intimate space that the dialectics of inside and outside draws its strength. (1994:229)
          
          The research has brought these forgotten stories to new and diverse audiences. It goes beyond the idea that “in history and in nature one can only know what exists” ( Althusser, 2008: 89)considering what might have been or even what should have existed, illustrates unrealised potential and significant achievement in the face of patriarchal resistance. The Galloway Car presents an intriguing moment in the advance of gender equality, conflating industrial production and cultural production ( Bourdieu P. 1993: 82) .
          
          The paper provides an overview of the research project with screened extracts of the documentary.
        Speaker: Tony Grace (University of the West of Scotland)
      • 14:25 Close With and Kill The Enemy: Contesting representations of violence, gender and military combat 20'
        ‘Nowhere is the notion of war as a mans game more entrenched than in state militaries’ (Basham 2016) 
          
          ’Simply put the infantry will be more effective in war if we include the best talent our country can breed - male and female’ (MOD 2018)
          
          In 2016 women were invited to take up ‘close with and kill the enemy’ fighting roles in the British military. The Ministry of Defence said these changes demonstrated equal opportunities. 
          
          In the same year the cultural theorist Victoria Basham wrote, ‘the relationship between armed force and masculinities is possibly the most salient and cross-culturally stable aspect of gendered politics.’ But are these representations either stable or entrenched? 
          
          This paper focusses on a deconstructivist methodology through which I explore instabilities associated with the gender construction of military warriors in British Army recruitment films: In some of the original films that I deconstruct, masculinities are conveyed through comforting motifs of tea and belonging. In others, female soldiers perform hand to hand combat and physical endurance roles. 
          
          My films combine theory with performance practice and borrowed footage. Through the process of cutting, isolating, repeating and fragmenting existing films I challenge how subjectivities are constructed and subverted. I draw on theorisations by Derrida, Butler, Benjamin and Weil to explore the blind spots and inconsistencies within the texts.
          
          This presentation comprises of a film and performed paper which outlines a practice led methodological approach. It forms part of a wider PHD research project on the construction of gender, militarism and violence.
        Speaker: Kirsten Adkins (University of Wolverhampton)
      • 14:45 Co-creation Strategies for Researching Resilience in Women Craft Groups: Challenging Dynamics of Epistemic Privilege 20'
        The paper addresses current issues in feminist knowledge production, examining a role of researchers as co-producers of knowledge and their commitment to constructing meaningful livelihoods of the researched subjects. The paper draws on an ethnographic study of a women’s lacemaking network Charming Threads in Kraków, Poland, and demonstrates the importance of the history of lacemaking locally. The lacemakers’ network was set up by Jadwiga Węgorek in 1999 to enhance individual well-being through making, creating, and exhibiting practice. The group consisted of aging individuals, predominantly women from the peripheral areas of the province.
          We draw on the self-reflexive accounts concerning the effects of long-term interpersonal engagement with lacemakers, access to their spaces and a dialogic exchange concerning their craft practice. We argue that in practicing anthropology, a feminist lens on knowledge production frames any research engagement as a primary responsibility of the researcher, and mindful of dangers of epistemic privilege, allows addressing operating power structures within the ethics of representation and capturing community process and community agency in meaning-making.
          The study confirms the value of craft activities as both creative and social processes that meaningfully contribute to the participants’ wellbeing and enhanced resilience. The paper also reports on the instances of women lacemakers taking up the roles of ethnographic researchers advocating the cultural value of their traditions, the very processes that simultaneously alter dynamics within a craft network.
        Speaker: Dr. Anna Sznajder (Polish Ethnological Society)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Wandering Cultures at the Turn of the 20th and 21st Centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. Experience, Memory, Narration: P 22.2

      Room 3.138

      "Aimless wandering from place to place has had various dimensions conditioned by social-historical context in the 20th and 21st centuries in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe. Adopted exceptional forms as exile during wars and revolutions being a result of ethnic and political persecution, war damage, famine. In the period of peace, wandering was also a response to poverty, including people’s need for shelter and work. For the Roma and Sinti, wandering has been associated with their nomadic tradition included in their long history of traversing the world rather than settling it. Wandering has been also a choice of a lifestyle of artists - flaneurs and tourists – seeking, in the ""way without an aim"", experiences, emotions and inspiration for their creativity. Nowadays, when some people still experience wandering as a burden, others decide to pay a high price to be participants of wandering tourism. Apart from people, also animals and objects have been wanderers. The experience of wandering in its various dimensions has been the most important part of memory of Eastern, Central and Southern Europe in the 20th/21st century and work of that memory is still a rich source of wandering narratives. In this context, we propose the following issues of our session: - diversity of experiences, memories and narratives of wandering - people, animals and objects as actors of wandering - transitions between experience, memory and narration concerning wandering - experience, memory and narration of wandering and the present challenge of exile."
      Conveners: Dr. Marta Cobel - Tokarska (Akademia Pedagogiki Specjalnej im. Marii Grzegorzewskiej), Dr. Claudia Florentina Dobre (Centre for Memory and Identity Studies (CSMI))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.138
      • 13:45 Experience, spatiality and narrative as transitional categories 20'
        The aim of the paper is to analyze the structure of experience during the movement of the subject of experience in time and space. I would like to show how the narrative of memory allows to articulate the experience of the subject in mouvement in time and space. The structure of narration synthesizes what is real in experience and what is spectral in comparison with what is real when crossing the borders of cultures, languages and previous experiences. Narration synthesizes, however, does not abolish the tension between real and spectral.
        Speaker: Prof. Maciej Bugajewski (UAM)
      • 14:05 Past for the future on Western and Norhern part of Poland in the context of german and german heritage. 20'
        Good, polish-german relationship on both inter-state and regional levels as also democratic changes in Poland has contributed a lot into regaining multicultural character of that area. It caused changes of approaches into german'f heritage, and bringing up to date history and memory of Germans.
          There are very differentiated forms of actualization of german's heritage. Some of them are political rituals, connected with some symbolic domains, pluralization of memory,revitalization of old germans architecture, philocards movement and regional's education, which includes also old, multiultural character and history of such cities as : Wrocław, Gdask and Szczecin. Some writers as for example as Paweł Huelle,and Stefan Chwin one of the leading authors of ""little home"" undertook and propagated the plot of previous inhabitants of that places. They located action of their novels in multicultural Gdansk, whereas Inga Iwasiów has written about polish- german Szczecin lately. Wrocław is working on literary legend of the multicultural city with especial exposition of german's heritage. Among bestselling writers of these trend there are also German's writers , especially Gunter Grass from Gdańsk.POlish- German neighborhood, based on dialogue is based on microhistorical ans regional level. That level ,and plenty of initiatives,undertaken by local communities are very dynamic processes, not free from ambiguities. A special forms of German's heritage and symbolic domains are cemeteries of old inhabitants. Plenty of these cemeteries were destroyed, some of them were liquidated and processes of updating these heritage plays many functions: political, cultural, religious ,reflects both state political history and local one also. 
        Speaker: Dr. Anna Wachowiak (Warsaw University of Life Sciences)
      • 14:25 Wandering objects. German products and its magical aura 20'
        The paper addresses the issue of usage, perception and circulation of German detergents in Poland in the context of their perceived quality. Presence of those products on the Polish market will be traced since the 1970s, through the changes of transformation, up to the modern times, which will be useful for discuss the problems such as: how they accessed socialist Poland; what values they evoced; what were they juxtaposed with; how are they perceived nowadays. The paper will address the discussion on producing better or worse quality products for different regions, and follow the never-ending suspicions of the potential consumers.
          
          Above issues will serve as a background for discussing the idea of IMAGINED and ACTUAL quality, in reference to the concept of truth. From the perspective of anthropology of things, the paper will follow the idea of efficiency, authenticity and imitation, as well as the problem of doubting the truth. Ultimately, some questions of importance of focusing on actual thruth will be raised: does it overshadow other anthropological phenomena? how important is it in relation to the sphere of beliefs and habits? how it refers to the imagined truth?
        Speaker: Barbara Tołłoczko-Scuhańska (Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences)
      • 14:45 Environmental Memory and its Functions in Memoirs of Polish Migrants after the 2nd World War 20'
        The paper concerns the relations between migrants and various natural elements. While settling, migrants experienced nature in many different ways. First, the nature they encountered in the Western Polish Territories was often different from what they knew from their former experience, - that resulted in the difficulties of adapting to the new environment. Second, some particular natural features were familiar to what they knew form their lost homes and that enabled them to familiarize easier to new conditions. Third - the tedious lack of animals influenced their attitude towards them and made them relate more on animals and appreciate them more. Nevertheless, some species were very annoying because, due to the war, they grew into the enormous numbers. Those animals, rodents in particular, were those the settlers had to fight with. In the paper I will present the different types of human - non-human relations and I will problematize them, giving the perspective of the environmental history.
        Speaker: Dr. Małgorzata Praczyk (Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Deconstructing Race: Biological or Social Concept?: P 19.2

      Room 2.103

      Race as a scientific concept arose in Europe in the eighteenth century, with the idea that humans can be subdivided into groups (subspecies) based on a set of morphological features and common geographic origin. Since the 1960s, an increasing number of anthropologists, especially in the United States, have successfully argued that biological race does not exist and emphasized that race is a socio-cultural construct. However, implicit assumptions of the race concept have not been eradicated. Moreover, in the current political climate, we are seeing the rise of nationalism and associated racial narratives that explicitly biologize social groups and construct geographic variation racially. Recently, some scientists have supported this narrative by publicly asserting that biological differences between human groups is evidence of the existence of race. This is an important time for anthropologists to work together, across sub-disciplines, to engage with race and we think this special IUAES Inter-Congress is an ideal venue. This panel will emphasize changes in the meaning of ‘race’ over time, paying special attention to the concept of race in modern research. The panel will bring together international scholars of biological and cultural anthropology to explore ways to develop and promote a shared anthropological perspective on race and human diversity. We will address both the resurgence of the race concept itself in science and society, and also the effects that the implicit assumptions of race have on the production of knowledge in anthropology.
      Conveners: Dr. Katarzyna A. Kaszycka (Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University), Dr. Rachel Caspari (Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, Central Michigan University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.103
      • 13:45 The Persistence of the Belief in Race and Biodeterminism in the United States 30'
        The vast majority of anthropologists and biologists reject biological determinism today, the biological deterministic ideologies are still with us today, and influences the way the general U.S. public thinks about such issues as race and behavior, gender, and biomedical thinking and practice. Anthropologists and other scientists have long struggled with the multiple meanings of race. In the biological sciences and in physical anthropology, race was used to describe human biological variation and subdivisions of the human species. Biology has played a role in the cultural invention of what we call race. And race, one’s racial designation, socially, can have biological consequences, including on one’s health status. The paper will discuss why the myth persists in the age of science in the 21st century? The writer contends that part of the reason the myths persist is that it they are deeply tied to U.S. notions of social history and social organization based on the social, economic and political history of the U.S. A history that is tied to Slavery and the taking of the land of Native Americans. During the 19th Century, proponents of Darwinian biology helped link the ideas of biological determinism to natural selection and to the justification for slavery, even though Darwin himself condemned slavery. Those who supported slavery for economic reasons used the natural selection arguments and the arguments of the Christian bible to buttress their claims for making human bondage a legitimate state of society, or a natural social order sanctioned by both science and God.
        Speaker: Dr. Yolanda Moses (University of California Riverside)
      • 14:15 Missing the forest for the trees: Race, ancestry and identity. 30'
        The western race concept is a colonial construction of human variation that continues to inform our understanding of human biology and evolution and our understandings of ancestry. Throughout the scientific history of human biology and evolution, social constructions of race played a role in how human variation was interpreted and, conversely, the science of human biology was used to sociopolitical ends. Gradually, a general consensus emerged in US anthropology, reflected in a special issue of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (Edgar and Hunley 2009), that human “races” do not exist in part because the apportionment of diversity of living humans is not patterned in ways consistent with the concept of race.
          Yet, in 2019 race is once again both politically important and a topic of controversy in human evolutionary studies. Evidence for this includes the recent publication of books and articles promoting arguments for the existence of biological races, buttressed with genetic data. Moreover, scientific studies are again being used to support racist ideologies. This paper examines this trend, focusing on the effects of racial thinking on both scientific and social constructions of ancestry and identity. I conclude that while assertions for the existence of biological races are highly flawed, the race concept remains a powerful influence in science and society that obscures understanding of human variation and continues to biologize social inequality.
          
          Edgar, H. J. H. and K. L. Hunley. 2009. Race Reconciled? How Biological Anthropologists
          View Human Variation. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 139:1-4.
        Speaker: Dr. Rachel Caspari (Central Michigan University)
      • 14:45 How Neandertals Inform the Understanding of Human Race 30'
        A decade ago I published a paper about how Neandertals inform human variation. In the time since there has been some evolution in anthropological approaches to understanding human variation, and a true revolution in our understanding of Neandertals.
          
          Races are subspecies, divisions of a species into geographically delineated and anatomically distinguishable groups defined by common descent and described as monophyletic (a common ancestor and all of its descendants). They are a key aspect of how some anthropologists and others partition humans into groups and describe how they relate to each other. But subspecies are no longer a favored topic in modern biology
          
          As hard and often as biological anthropologists (especially of the 19th and earlier 20th centuries) have tried to apply this biological precept to understanding human variation, the attempts have failed because human races are widely recognized as social and not biological constructs. But the two have continued to be mixed with each other.
          
          Neandertals are relevant to this issue because they are one of our ancestors, anatomically distinct and geographically delineated. They mixed successfully with everyone they encountered, including the ancestors of modern humans. But unlike mixing populations today, some regions of their genome were not passed on to modern generations. These “genetic deserts” are areas where natural selection acted against the Neandertal version of the effected genes.
          
          Neandertals were a human subspecies. They reveal what true human races would be like in the vastly more populated world of today, if there were any, but there are not.
        Speaker: Dr. Milford Wolpoff (University of Michigan)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Anthropology and the Sustainable Development Goals: Should Anthropologists Become More Involved and How? [WAU Roundtable]: RT 2
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.43
      • 13:45 Anthropology and the Sustainable Development Goals: Should Anthropologists Become More Involved and How? [WAU Roundtable] 1h45'
        The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides “a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future”. At its core are 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries in a global partnership. They acknowledge that ending poverty and other deprivations has to go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur balanced urbanization and economic growth, while tackling climate change and working to preserve oceans and forests. This round table asks how anthropologists can contribute to attaining the goals adopted by the UN member states to ensure human survival on Earth. The sustainable development challenges are certainly all important as topics for anthropological research, and central to the work of many policy oriented and applied anthropologists. The discussants will provide an overview of how anthropology can contribute more to addressing the SDGs and exploring their interconnections, building on the unique integrative-holistic orientation of the discipline and our understanding of local diversity.
        Speakers: Dr. Vesna Vucinic Neskovic - Convenor (University of Belgrade), Dr. Thomas Reuter - Convenor (University of Melbourne), Faye Harrison (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Gustavo Lins Ribeiro (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Lerma), Heather O'Leary (Washington University in St. Louis), Soumendra Patnaik (Utkal University)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Audiovisual Session: AV 2

      Room 2.122

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.122
      • 13:45 Ruins of a Splendid Holiday/Original title: Ruins of a Splendid Holiday 26'
        This is an audiovisual ethnography of the memories of perpetrators of state violence, particularly lower level actors who carried out the murderous plan during the May 18 in 1980, Gwangju, South Korea. In 1980, Gwangju, located in the agricultural Honam region in South Korea, became a theater of state violence as a great many civilians were brutally killed by the martial law army. But we still know almost nothing about the “people” especially lower level actors who carried out the massacre. While the victims of the May 18 have been the subject of significant academic research since the 1990s, particularly after the democratization of South Korea, the perpetrators of state violence have rarely been featured in this landscape. I tried to examine the contrast between the visibility of victims and the invisibility of perpetrators.

        2018, South Korea/Shooting locations: Gwangju, Seoul/Original language: Korean
        Speaker: Dasom LEE (Free University of Berlin)
      • 14:11 Faire-part/Original title: Faire-part 1h0'
        On the eve of postponed Congolese elections, two Congolese and two Belgian cineastes make a film about Kinshasa and its resistance against the legacies of colonialism. The four filmmakers want to tell a story together, but having grown up on other sides of history, they have different views on how to tell that story. What should it look like? Who should be in it? For whom is it made? Faire-part is the search of four filmmakers for a way to portray the city. Through filming artistic performances in public space, they paint a provocative picture of Kinshasa and its relations with the rest of the world.

        2019/Shooting locations: Kinshasa, DRC/Original language: French, Lingala, Dutch
        Speakers: Anne Reijniers (Collectif Faire-part), Paul Shemisi (Collectif Faire-part), Nizar Saleh (Collectif Faire-part), Rob Jacobs (Collectif Faire-part)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development: P 7.2

      Room 2.21

      "Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development” is based on significant events of present era demonstrate that anthropology has established a new grip in the public sphere—one can make the most of novel forms of communication to reach far beyond the academic activities to distribute knowledge widely and freely. This focuses on different contemporary areas of vigorous anthropological research in future that also addressed some of the natural life most extreme problems and issues. Anthropology believes in a model of development that is more people centric. One that focuses on issues such as environment, poverty, food security, gender, social justice, inclusive growth etc. Such a model, we believe, needs to take culture as an important component of the idea of sustainable development with world solidarity and peace. Anthropology as a discipline enable the cultivation of certain modes of thinking which will prepare individuals and societies to face these three urgent challenges of the twenty first century: solidarity, peace and development. As a discipline, Anthropology can lend a powerful voice to non–hegemonic and marginalized cultural perspectives on Solidarity, Peace and Development, and thereby lead to more fruitful conversations on the topic.
      Conveners: Dr. Iswa Chandra Naik (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha), Dr. Raghuraman Trichur (California State University), Ms. Dwiti Vikramaditya (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.21
      • 13:45 Industrilization, development and Inclusive Tribal Rights: A case study of Niyamgiri Kondh Tribe of Orissa 20'
        The crises faced among the tribal community have been exclusion from the developmental policy. Tribes are the most victimized in terms of their identity, culture, forceful displacement from their habitat. The impact of industrializations has affected the marginalized people in general and tribal in particular. The tribal economy is being replaced by the global market economy, which has created obstacle in the livelihood patterns of everyday lives of the tribals.. Inspite of KBK project, Kondh are facing starvation deaths. Also the establishment of Vedanta Aluminum Company has disturbed their livelihood, lifestyle, identity and land rights. Their agricultural land has been sacked, natural belief system has been lapsed, and diseases have been spread through water contamination. All this has accelerated the environmental degradation. Though government paper present they have distributed compensation to the tribals but in reality most of them are just fake stories. Such situation demands that the governmental policy has to focus on the pros and cons of the region.
          It can be said that to facilitate industry one has to be in pace with the traditional values, community needs, and individual requirements of the aborigine tribes. Also policies have to ensure the rights of the tribal in order to preserve their distinct culture. The present study is conducted to analyse the problem faced by the Kondh in terms of occupational, lifestyle, identity crises along with the impact of developmental activity.
        Speaker: Dr. Bibekananda Nayak (Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University)
      • 14:05 Identity politics, solidarities and development in Jaunsar Bawar tribal region 20'
        Jaunsar Bawar is declared as a tribal area by the government of India. Hence those living in the region even when they identify themselves as belonging to privileged castes enjoy the benefits of being categorised as scheduled tribes. These privileged castes have come to dominate politics in the region and are depriving the really deprived scheduled castes from the benefits of development. The latter are becoming politically restive and are resisting upper caste dominance. I propoes to examine the dynamics of this conflict using my fieldwork data that I collected over three months in the region.
        Speaker: Vandana Kumari (Anthropological Survey of India)
      • 14:25 Does representation of women in Panchayati Raj Institutions reduces gender inequality? Voices from periphery. 20'
        Through the enactment of 73rd Amendment Act, the power equations were decentralised but women participation is conspicuously absent in the field of representation at the local councils. Women’s participation in politics, is appallingly low as compared to men not only in India but rest of world, would serve as a powerful tool of empowerment. The elected representatives of women in Panchayat Raj Institutions constitute meagre 46 percent which is predominantly less as compared to men participation in India (Ministry of Panchayati Raj, Government of India). With 73rd amendment act 1992 in India 33 percent of seats were reserved for women in Panchayat Raj Institutions but how far in reality it was effective still needs a second thought. Although power has devolved but the Indian social structure depicts altogether different decision making phenomenon in the form of elite capture and proxy participation which directly affects women role in political participation. The paper attempts to examine why women participation in politics is low in local governance by taking references from Kerala, Karnataka, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and Odisha. It would throw light on how women representation in PRIs will address important concern namely gender inequality and participation in decision making process. The paper will rely on both primary and secondary data. The secondary data will be collected from published data and journals of Government of India, World Bank, UN –Women and other sources. The primary data will be collected from elected women representative’s members of PRIs through randomly selected Gram Panchayat of Odisha.
        Speaker: Dr. Eswarappa Kasi (National Institute of Technology , Rourkela)
      • 14:45 How to distribute the knowledge in education widely? 20'
        New grip of anthropology had happened. In various scientific habitats there are desires to popularize anthropology. The results of surveys show that these needs are different – they are differently understood and implemented by anthropologist. In a local and global scale there is also a problem with a various understanding of:
          a) Popularization in education, so what to promote:
          - The results?
          - An attempt to change receiver‘s thinking?
          b) Popularization, but of what:
          - Anthropological perspective?
          - Assumptions of our study?
          - Our knowledge?
          c) Popularization, but how?
          - Where is the border?
          - When do we promote our own views?
          - When do we promote the results of research?
          
          Through the analysis of the answers to these questions, we should be aware of the modern conditions in the ways of promoting anthropology:
          - filter bubble,
          - social radicalization,
          - reduced trust in science.
          
          After we got the answers to these questions and after we got to know the community, which we are talking to, we can look for the proper ways of promoting anthropology.
          
          In my speech I will present the analysis based on the Polish conditions as a result of my doctoral dissertation. I will also present the scope of methods of popularization anthropology in youth education in Poland.
        Speaker: Anna Pospieszna (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Connecting people through sports (Commission on the Anthropology of Sports): P 15.2

      Room 1.71

      Sports has been, currently and thorough its history from the 19th century, an arena where people are simultaneously connected and isolated, exercise their solidarity and fighting for their supremacy. Many groups and individuals use sportive practices and events in order to improve their visibility, to claim their identities, and to share experiences through the world. Not only a place of confrontations, sports also connect people from different backgrounds and create new networks. In an environment of competitions and rivalry, sport practitioners sharing some goals, constraints, and sense of solidarity (between teammates, for example) can become a community of practice, in a short or long term. How do people and groups build their identities and networks through sportive events and practices? How dimensions of competitions and solidarities in sports are articulated by individuals and groups, spectators and practitioners, to create new kinds of communities? Did an Anthropology of sports can allow a new understanding of the concept of "relationship"? In this panel, our aim is also to create a place where the concepts of "solidarity" and "connection" can be articulated in two different ways among scholars. In the first sense, by connecting researches from different countries and theoretical perspectives, in a possible more collective and comparative studies. In the second sense, focusing primarily on the political dimension of sportive practices, connecting different areas (gender, identities, and others) of interest of the Anthropology of Sports, around a common theme.
      Conveners: Dr. Luiz Rojo (Universidade Federal Fluminense), Dr. Jérôme Soldani (Universite Paul Vallery)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71
      • 13:45 Changing Images of Gender in Sports: The Case of Women’s Rugby in Japan 20'
        Rugby has long been recognized as men’s sports. One reason is, rugby has developed among public schools in England. In this situation, rugby was played by boys. Rugby team₋work had been used as a metaphor for well-organized companies in Japan. Sweat and power were symbolic of men; until recently rugby was the image of men’s sports. However, now, women have advanced in many sports, even in rugby. Are the metaphors also changing? How are women recruited for rugby in Japan? I researched some rugby clubs for children, adults and junior high school students. When the clubs intended to establish a women’s rugby team, they all confronted the problem that it was not easy to gather the women members. How do they get the women members? Can they change the image of gender in sports? This presentation will address rugby since the inclusion of women. @font-face { font-family: "MS 明朝"; }@font-face { font-family: Century; }@font-face { font-family: Century; }@font-face { font-family: "@MS 明朝"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0mm 0mm 0.0001pt; text-align: justify; font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: "Century", "serif"; }.MsoChpDefault { font-family: "Century", "serif"; }div.WordSection1 { }
        Speaker: Prof. Eiko Hara Kusaba (Iwate Prefectural University)
      • 14:05 Sport and disability in the movement 20'
        The movement “Lend my legs” began in Santos, a city in Sao Paulo’s coast (Brazil), in 2016, when three young men with cerebral paralysis asked a couple to participate in a street runner. This couple, who were volunteers in a social project for people with disabilities and amateur street runners, satisfied this request, invited a person more and lent their legs, pushing those three youth in their wheelchairs for five kilometers. From this first moment, they turned that initiative in a movement to propitiate sportive practice for people with disabilities outside the Paralympic movement, more oriented to high performance. However, what began as an individual initiative quickly spread by the country, and now it is present in a lot of cities in Brazil, not only for street runners, but in cycling, rowing, and even to make possible the participation of people with disabilities in the samba’s schools in Carnival. In this paper, I will present the initial discussion about my fieldwork with the Niteroi and Rio de Janeiro groups, where I compare the concepts of sport and disability present in these groups and in the Paralympic movement. From this comparison it will be possible to understand the different comprehensions about identity and citizenship which are on the basis of these concepts.
        Speaker: Dr. Luiz Fernando Rojo (Universidade Federal Fluminense)
      • 14:25 Forging New Networks Based on Shared Provenance: The Experience of Lusophone African Football Migrants 20'
        This paper examines the processes of solidarity in which black, white, and mestiço (mixed race) football players engaged as they migrated from Portugal’s African territories to the metropole from roughly the 1940s until the end of the colonial period in 1975. Once in the metropole, I argue that provenance served as a durable social bond, transcending, eroding, or at least tempering social, racial, and even political divides. Throughout, provenance remained an important aspect of personal identity, with African footballers hailing from the same colonies enjoying a natural affinity predicated on shared experiences and points of reference that transcended their oft-divergent socioeconomic backgrounds. Shared provenance also generated a type of resilient solidarity, as black and mestiço players shared a series of formative experiences with white players from the colonies.
          
          Although scholars have heretofore considered the implications of provenance among immigrant communities, examples of interracial cooperation in these reconstituted communities are rare, as diasporic populations often reflect and actively maintain preexisting social divides. My emphasis on the experiential importance of provenance and its transcendent role in facilitating and deepening intercultural amity, community, and solidarity among these migrant athletes builds upon these examinations of the development of genuine interracial, intergender relations in colonial Africa. These players’ engagement in a multitude of cooperative and conciliatory relationships that generated new communities and networks composed of players, but also of players and fans in both the metropole and the empire, suggests that sportive activity can transcend an array of divides, past and present.
        Speaker: Dr. Tod Cleveland (University of Arkansas)
      • 14:45 The Internet, multisensuality and social imaginary: learning brazilian jiu-jitsu (the case of one Polish club) 20'
        The aim of my paper is to analyze the connection of the Polish practitioners of brazilian jiu-jitsu with the global community of trainees through the virtual circulation of the techniques (as the body practices) by the Internet and its consequences for the local form of Brazilian jiu-jitsu and the local training process. Referring to the conducted fieldwork, learning the mentioned martial art turns out to be a multi-channeled process with the various sources of the techniques (trainer, the Internet, class mates). The network of the people transmitting the techniques to each other very often interconnects with the Web as a source of video materials, merging „virtual” and „real” communities of practicioners and building a common social imaginary. Sharing a techniques during trainings creates a phenomena of „culture of mutual progress” and „somatic mediatization”. What is more, learning during class and learning from the Internet in both cases implies a paralell structure: multisensual process reversing the embodiment paradigm and evoking the Cartesian dualism.
        Speaker: Karol Górski (Warsaw University)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Solidarity in times of (in)security: P 2.2

      Room 3.160

      In the context of current multiple global crises, a new tide of militarization promises security, providing a recognition of individual value based on belonging to protected groups. Multiple forms of grassroots and cross-class organizations operate this aspect of solidarity, often beyond territories covered by official security policies. Meanwhile, initiatives running counter to militarization and securitization propose a notion of security based on solidarity. For example, the Refugees Welcome initiative in Germany aims at fostering solidarity with refugees amidst societal debates on the insecurity that refugees are seen to cause. The Transition movement promotes a politics towards the climate crisis based in preference for local systems of mutual help, instead of top-down security measures. The centrality of security in current debates about climate, immigration, or economic welfare tends to obscure its silent pendant – the force of solidarity. The theorization of the complex nexus between solidarity and security in current reactions to global crises might be a major anthropological contribution to understanding and dealing with current crises. The panel aims at examining the relationship between security and solidarity, asking: - How do solidarities emerge and function in an age of (in)security, and how do they change or undermine practices and discourses of (in)security? - How do rationalities of solidarity and rationalities of security stand in contrast, opposition, or complementarity to each other, or, more ambiguously, in complicity with each other? We seek ethnographically informed cases which discuss these and other connex issues, aiming at theorizing the nexus between security and solidarity.
      Conveners: Dr. Ana Ivasiuc (Justus Liebig University), Dr. Agnes Gagyi (University of Gothenburg)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.160
      • 13:45 Political Solidarity Among Indian Muslim Women 20'
        India adopted its own constitution on 26th January 1950. The constitution accepted the ideal of Secularism which implies full freedom and equal respect for all religions. The presence of large number of religious minorities is the testimony of the secular state. Indian Muslim women feel that they are exploited on the name of religion. It is observed that all religions legitimize the subordinate position of women. The position of women in Indian Muslim Society is decided by the provisions of Muslim personal law, which are most repressive to women. Fundamentalist Muslims in India refused to accept any change in personal law. 
          In this paper I have tried to study that when Muslim women are oppressed beyond toleration they supported the party against the wishes of their family members. The Political Solidarity which always supported Congress and Samajwadi party changed into supporting.
          Objectives-
          1. To determine the level of awareness towards gender discrimination and Hijab.
          2. To study the Influence of Party supporting freedom from Teen Talaq System.
          The study is conducted in Varanasi. The paper is based on 100 Muslim women selected through purposive sample. I also selected 5 women for case study.
          The study concluded that Muslim women are coming out of their shell of Shariat. For the first time in Indian political history they voted Bhartiya Janta Party in 2014 against the wishes of their counterparts and Fatwa of Imam.
        Speaker: Dr. BHAWNA (LAL BHADHUR SHASHTRI P.G COLLEGE MUGHALSARAI)
      • 14:05 "Human rights for the right humans": The rise and fall of "democratic" policing models in Brazil. 20'
        This paper explores the rise and fall of two "democratic" policing programs in under-resourced favelas in Brazil. Based on six years of ethnographic research among police officers in Recife and Rio de Janeiro, I reveal the varying ways in which the state has implemented progressive policing models that successfully reduced violence rates. However, the recent election of a right wing government has re-vived the ideology of a "war on drugs" and encouraged police to kill suspects. As a result, we have observed the resurgence of massacres commited by the military police. I will discuss the demise of “soft” neoliberal urban governance models, where the police remained at the center of the security state but were framed by international development and human rights discourses. I examine how the notion of “democratic” policing has been constructed, understood, and transformed on the ground by police officers and favela residents. The discussion goes beyond the dominant narrative that characterizes police primarily as state instruments to explore their role as ideological influencer and enforcer. I argue that due to a chronic racial segregation, lacking infrastructure, and misconstrued solidarity within the military police, human rights were conceptualized as weakness. Favela residents, on the other hand, largely experienced "democratic" policing approaches in form of rising cost of living and gentrification. I argue that examining the experiences of police officers and favela residents on the ground leading up the the 2018 presidential election is central to understanding current public security measures and its future.
        Speaker: Dr. Marta Laura Suska (CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice)
      • 14:25 Talking security, meaning solidarity: an analysis of poor people’s discourse 20'
        Security and solidarity are often seen as contradictory entities. This is the position mostly presented by the so-called securitization or (in)securitization studies, although exceptions exist. This paper however aspires to show the opposite. Drawing from vernacular security studies and the work of Nick Vaughan-Williams and Daniel Stevenson on the disruptive potential of non-elite knowlerge, the paper will show that the security discourse of poor people living in a so-called socially excluded locality in the Czech Republic (or: Gypsy ghettos, coloquially speaking) in fact includes emancipatory potentials. These potentials then may be mobilized by researchers not only to challenge dominant security representations and practices bus also to propose new security policies that depart from exceptionalism, violence and competition in favour of inclusion, democracy and cooperation. The concept of solidarity is especially useful within this effort. As a political idea and ideal, solidarity may guide the security policy-making to the state when commonalities will be recognized as a more solid ground for security policies than differences. The paper is based on my ten-years long research engagement with security within the socially excluded localities. This was mostly ethnographic endevaour, taking place in two localities situated in Ústecký and Moravia-Silesian Regions, the two of the most deprived regions in the country.
        Speaker: Dr. Václav Walach (Charles University)
      • 14:45 Let’s Eat Them Together’. Food procurement practices of domination and resistance in the city of Athens. 20'
        More specifically, of the various grassroots solidarity initiatives in the city of Athens, this paper focuses on those relating to sourcing food, namely no-middle-men markets and middle-class delis that reshape political foodways.
          
          The no-middle men markets operating around the city challenge pre-existing capitalist structures. At the same time, they bring Athenians closer to nature and to the Greek rural, by restoring the broken foodways between the country and the city. At times of crisis Athenians go back to practices of the past and to the comfort of rurality. This way of understanding and dealing with the crisis manifests as well in the middle-upper class Athenians. These Athenians create their own political foodways forming networks of small neighbourhood clusters shops, in a new rising shopping model of sourcing food directly from/closer to nature which resembles the old ways of shopping. These become part of exonerating the rural and reaffirming Athenians’ rural identities. In essence, these shops operate in the same way the no middle-men markets operate, but in a different class sphere. 
          
          Across class divides, the crisis has affected Athenians in similar ways: they tap into past practices and exonerate and celebrate the rural, by creating a moral economy and reembedding sociability in the markets. By researching all these movements described here this paper illustrates how across class divides, food becomes a trope of resistance in a city in crisis.
        Speaker: Nafsika Papacharalampous (SOAS, University of London)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 (Im)Mobilising Longing: subversive potentials and seductive snares between distance and desire: P 1.2

      Room 3.94

      Practices, trajectories, and places of longing are keys to the imaginative horizons (Crapanzano, 2003) and the alternative utopias (Kiossev, 2013) of individuals and societies. Yet, if “belonging” holds a prominent place in contemporary Anthropology, the notion of “longing” has tended to appear in a more marginal position. This panel furthers a recent shift of perspective from belonging to longing that research on nostalgia, on hope and yearning, or on tourism and migrant imaginaries has initiated in the past years. We invite presenters to address longing as a human strategy, cultural technique, affective and possibly spiritual engagement with the world – one that operates across time and space and is able to transcend them through a negotiation between distance and desire. This panel suggests a reflection on global practices of longing and their moral, political, economic, and spiritual trajectories in the light of desired change, necessary resistance, experienced loss, and regimes of consumption (of mobility, imaginaries, romance). In the light of the overall conference theme of “world solidarity”, longing has particular relevance – acts of solidarity often occur hand in hand with shared senses or traditions of longing. Deepening the link with the congress theme, we call contributors to consider the subversive potential of longing, the seductive traps that longing can create, and the mobilizing capacity of longing for individuals and societies. We particularly welcome papers that explore longing as intersection of personal experiences, cultural environments of longing (eg. Sehnsucht, saudade, dor, akogare), and global narratives (incl. tourism, consumption, neoliberalism).
      Conveners: Dr. Hannah Wadle (FairerTales), Dr. Lukasz Kaczmarek (Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.94
      • 13:45 From Nostalgia to Longing: Turning to the Future through Contemporary Dance in Palestine 20'
        Along the 20th century, mobilisation of arts for the Palestinian national struggle has been characterized by the nostalgia of an imagined and rural pre-Nakba Palestinian life. Nevertheless, recent researches have highlighted the way new forms of artistic practices in Palestine as well as in the Diaspora allow young Palestinians to create an alternative vision of the national struggle, distancing themselves from this nostalgia and rooting their art in their individual and contemporary experience. Contemporary dance in the West Bank seems to follow and go beyond this logic. In fact, dancers and choreographers use contemporary dance not only to express their contemporary experience but still to draw the lines of a future nation. Building on the concept of hope, the communication will focus on the mobilization of contemporary dance as a tool among Palestinian from the West Bank, Israel and the Diaspora to rethink their belongings and struggle by turning to the future instead of seeking an idealized past. Contemporary dance is thought by these actors as a way of imagining and building the nation they’re longing as well as an alternative path of struggle. It is also a tool to share this hoped future with various international actors through a common art and, tough, to create transnational solidarities. The communication is based on an ongoing multi-sited research in Palestine and Europe which ought to highlight the articulations between contemporary dance and Palestinian national belongings in a transnational context.
        Speaker: Ana Rodriguez (Université de Lausanne)
      • 14:05 Crossing Borders: Jewish and Arab Mixed Families in Israel 20'
        Mixed Jewish-Arab couples and mixed families living in Israel constitute social phenomena that have never been thoroughly researched up to now. Such families are a rare exception in our region and tend to be socially illegitimated by both societies. The study asks who crosses this social boundary, what are the living realities that such unions craft for the mixed family, and ultimately, can the phenomenon of mixed marriages contribute to making a more peaceful future in the Middle-East.
         
        From these broad questions, a number of secondary questions arise: How are these relationships formed? What mechanisms make it possible to create such a relationship? How do the couples choose to raise their children in terms of the main spoken language at home, education and religious practices? With what identity do the children grow up? Do they feel Palestinian, Israelis or have a mixed identity? Does it form solidarities? What kind of relationship exists in the daily life between the mixed families and their extended families? Does the tension and hostility between the larger social groups seep into the marital relationship and if so, in what ways?
         
        
         
        In this lecture, I will discuss the emerge of solidarity between Israel and Palestine in the families daily life and the ways its affect their local social circles. Therefore, I will discuss the nature of the phenomena, its scope and the way it is perceived by both spouses on all levels: the nuclear family, the extended one, the community and the state.
        Speaker: Alice Gaya (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
      • 14:25 Neverland: Polish utopia of normality and longing for belonging 20'
        Polish migrants in Dublin, after they admit that they are rather satisfied with their socioeconomic situation and that the reason why they have left Poland was their strive for a ‘normal life’, when asked if they are planning to go back to Poland, usually say “yes, someday off course, but…” This is usually a pretext for long conversations about ‘what’s Poland like’, ‘how it should be’, what it means ‘normal’, and why it is so hard to achieve it. Such a discussion usually tends to rationalise the choice to move and stay abroad. Pretty often it is also an occasion to complain a bit on the New Country, just to make sure that the ethnographer knows that a new place is not any Idyll. It is significant, that they use Polish ethno-cultural framework of belonging and they transfer the imaginaries of happiness they gained in Poland to the new society.
          One of the consequences of being immersed in the Polish regime of identity is a specific way of perceiving the ethnic order in the new country of residence that the Polish migrants would like to belong to, but they feel it is too soon.
        Speaker: Dr. Łukasz Kaczmarek (Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Climate Change, Food and Water Security of the Marginalized Communities Globally [Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid and Commission on Anthropology and Environment]: P 12.2

      Room 3.136

      Our planet is under several kinds of major threats, including severe climate change and wanton destruction of the natural environment. Globally, there is increasing spread of inequality, along with severe poverty among the marginalized a large part of it due to anthropogenic causes driven by corporate greed and escalating violence. Mere survival for the poor and marginalized is rapidly becoming a critical problem. Potable water is disappearing in many areas of the world, and malnutrition is becoming the norm in some areas. Even within the same community and family there is increasing internal discrimination based on gender, age and other factors, making some people extremely vulnerable. At the macro level, increasing right-wing conservatism is making negative impacts as neoliberal economic policies are spreading. Social/cultural factors and political and economic policies are both threatening the environment and making discrimination increasingly prevalent. This panel invites papers based on empirical data highlighting these issues and dealing with their complexities such as intersection of gender, race, caste and ethnicity with problems of poverty and livelihood. Papers from the Third World and marginal communities like the indigenous people are especially welcome. Climate change, neo-liberal economic policies and the increasing impact of political conservatism on the environment, poor people and marginal regions of the world need to be highlighted and there is need for a dialogue between those interested in sustainability and a viable future for the coming generations not only of humans but of all species.
      Conveners: Dr. Subhadra Channa (Delhi University), Dr. Joan Mencher (CUNY), Dr. Saakshi Joshi (Center for Science and Environment (CSE))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.136
      • 13:45 Serious Drinking Water Safety Guarantee Issue in China: Actual cases of Drinking & Cooking Water Purchasing situation among First tier city citizen 20'
        YouShui service refers to the smart water station in the neighborhood that filter the tap water for residents to purchase. Companies like Guangzhou Youshui and Shenzhen Youshui started the Large-Packing Drinking Water Vending machine mode in Mainland China.
          Sample Case: Over 300 families lived in a Middle class Neighborhood in Shenzhen participated a tap-water quality test in 2018. The result shown that 98% of the water sample failed to reach the standard (rust, impurity and strange smell ere exceeding standard level). Over 80 family purchased the smart drinking water station service after the test.
          There’s over 50% of the city water distribution system in China has exceeded the standard of leakage rate. In the meantime, secondary water supplying equipment are developing in disorder. 95% of the water supplying equipment is built by real estate developers without proper guarantee of the material or treatment process. Discussion:
          1. Why can’t the government guarantee the cost of reforming and maintaining of water distribution system?
          2. Is the accountability mechanism against real estate developers regarding water distribution systems effective? 
          3. Are the self-help water station safe enough to use? Is it reasonable for residents to purchase themselves?
        Speaker: Zirui Guo (NNU School of Foreign Languages and Cultures)
      • 14:05 Indigenous Human Rights: Sovereignty, Foods, and Water 20'
        Food sovereignty has a variety of manifestations that has evolved and sought to challenge multinational corporations and global agribusiness processes on multiple levels in pursuit of more decentralized conceptions of sovereignty (Andree, 2014). The forced removal of the traditional food sources is reinforcing the pandemic of diabetes and associated comorbidities among indigenous peoples of North America. Access to clean drinking water is a human right, and is recognized as such by United Nations General Assembly (2010) Resolution 64/292. Although there is an international call for financial resources from organizations and member States to provide financial support to provide clean and accessible drinking water, control over customary rights and water resources held by indigenous peoples is extracted or challenged by privatization of water systems or non-indigenous government authorities (Radonic, 2017). Neo-colonial political economic policies erode efforts to sustain historical and established indigenous water and foods rights. This paper focuses on Indigenous efforts to advance water and foods sustainability and their intersection with preservation and protections of indigenous economic, political sovereignty, and health within human rights protection contexts.
          
          Globalization and Food Sovereignty : Global and Local Change in the New Politics of Food, edited by Peter Andree, et al., University of Toronto Press, 2014.
          
          Radonic, L. (2017). Through the aqueduct and the courts: An analysis of the human right to water and indigenous water rights in Northwestern Mexico. Geoforum, 84, 151-159.
          
          United Nations. (2010). The human right to water and sanitation. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Retrieved from: 
        Speaker: Dr. Amy Williams (University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh)
      • 14:25 Matter out of place: Human and material displacement in coastal cities 20'
        Three of the top five global risks to social stability relate to climate change and failure to adapt (World Economic Forum 2018). Climate change affects people around the world, but not equally.Climate change amplifies disruptions and displacements in coastal cities. By 2050, 70% of our population is predicted to live in cities, with most of the absolute growth in Asia, where many urbanites already face water crisis and whose cities are among the soonest predicted for climate change destruction (OECD 2014).
         
        Climate change risks are not simple natural facts - they intersect with, challenge and reinforce social differences and inequalities. Yet many of the proposed solutions perpetuate such disparities. This paper examines the hegemonic discourse that both naturalizes and disowns the casualties of discriminatory risk mitigation. It links the depictions and lived experiences of socio-material risk under climate change by bringing into closer conversation two key conceptual lenses resulting in an engendered subaltern environmentalism.
         
        Specifically, it explores urban flooding discourse through metaphors of pollution as it relates to the incursion of water and people.This violent epistemological framework undergirds discourse about climate change mitigation and dramatically impacts institutional, infrastructural and informational adaptation schemes.Climate change discourse remains a vital site for explicit and covert contestations of authority over our planet, our cities, our rights and our bodies.The analytic is a mechanism for developing the next wave of intersectional environmental justice. It destabilizes monolithic approaches to climate risk mitigation, pointing towards more sustainable futures through world solidarity.
        Speaker: Dr. Heather O'Leary
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Competing environmentalist discourses and language of solidarity [IUAES Commission for Linguistic Anthropology and IUAES Commission: Anthropology and the Environment]: P 14.2

      Room 2.100

      Given the complexity of contemporary environmental crises, the need to increase environmental awareness over the last decades has led to the progressive presence of competing environmental discourses in both academy and public. Many environmental general concepts are well-known, however they are often used in a haphazard way, while ways in which environmental problems are interpreted and solutions proposed at the environment/ development interface lack consistency. A recent integrational/ecological field of ecolinguistics has a great potential for contributing to trans-disciplinary collaborations among environmental research and environmental communication as it considers a wide range of oppressed groups (e.g. including animals and current generations of humans who are suffering from pollution and resource depletion), and considers the impact of discourses on the wider systems that support life. This panel invites papers that aim to reconsider various discourses, both synchronically and diachronically through original and empirically based case studies of the language and discourse involved in the discussion of environmental and ecological issues, and interrogate how, in the media, corporate and activist circles, language is employed to argue for and propagate selected positions on the growing ecological crisis. Along with criticising the destructive impact of discourses such as advertising or economics, or detecting ambivalent discourses such as eco-tourism, sustainability or greenwash, particularly welcome are papers using positive discourse analysis of new social and environmental movements, such as those that advocate food sovereignty or solidarity economy, that might provide understanding of how change happens, for the better, across a range of environmental issues.
      Conveners: Dr. Anita Sujoldžić (Institute for Anthropological Research), Dr. Olga Orlić (Institute for Anthropological Research), Dr. Saša Poljak Istenič (Slovenia Sections Library of the Institute of Slovenian Ethnology Institute of Slovenian Ethnology)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.100
      • 13:45 Environmental cyberactivism in Serbia: A case study of the facebook group "Protect the Rivers of Stara planina" 20'
        This paper presents the digital ethnography of the Facebook group „Protect the Rivers of Stara Planina“, established in 2017 by local activists and with over 60,000 members today. Primarily an informal environmental grassroots movement against the construction of small hydropower plants in Serbia, with the help of social networks it has surpassed local level and become a wider environmental movement on a national level. Research of this group provides a deeper insight into the role new media technologies have in the shaping of new social movements (in terms of accessing, using, creating and disseminating information and as a platform for mobilization through social networks), and understanding of the evolution of new social movements (in this case from the local community to the Internet and back to the streets) – understanding how online and offline forms of engagement are mutually constitutive. This Facebook group is not only a place for mobilization and collective action of its members but also a place of creativity and solidarity. The focus of this paper is the analysis of online interactions and cultural practices of its members, their rhetorical strategies and various expressive materials they create and share. The content of the FB group, i.e. the communicative genres that are being created, posted and transmitted (posts, short clips, poems, photos, memes, image macros made by members) are examples of vernacular creativity, or in other words, the digital folklore of this environmental cyber community.
        Speaker: Dr. Ana Banić Grubišić (University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philosophy, Department of Ethnology and Anthropology)
      • 14:05 Food sovereignty discourses in Croatia 20'
        Food sovereignty movement makes the significant part of the global struggle for solidarity (moral, good) economy as well as the important part in fighting the climate change. It is the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. The struggle encompasses several topics, and each one of these has its own ecolinguistic repertoire. In this article we will present the analysis of the media and public discourse in the past 10 years in Croatia focused around this particular topic. The focus will be on comparing the discourses of the two main parts in the struggle – various supranational agencies operating on the EU level (Including Croatian representatives), NGOs fighting for seeds, water and ecological food, ecological farmers, on one side, and the mainstreams actors, such as producers of fertilizers, pesticides and GMO seeds on the other, state institutions that are to be of service to the people, and conventional farmers, on the other.
        Speaker: Dr. Olga Orlić (Institute for Anthropological Research)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Beyond-human solidarities. Perceptions, ontologies and interactions with Earth beings: P 11.2

      Room 3.20

      Beyond-human interactions are given a growing interest in anthropology today. While the so-called “ontological turn” has initiated a broad theoretical debate, renovated discourses and practices about “(re)connecting” with “Earth beings” (Cadena 2015) are also emerging, especially in the Western world. In order to ground the discussion on empirical evidences, this panel welcomes contributions that are aiming to explore solidaritiesbeyond humans and within a plurality of worlds, deriving from diverse epistemological and ontological foundations. A large range of research can feed the reflexion. For instance, research based on phenomenological and sensorial approaches studying modes of relation such as alternative agricultures or composting can refresh ontological discussions. Those can remain sometimes too abstract and encompassing to overcome the schemes they ambition to supersede. Ritual innovation including non-human beings within alternative spiritualities and deep ecological movements is another relevant field of investigation. Also, ethnographical studies around the global movement for the rights of nature reveal the attempt to include new subjects in the realm of law, this “other world” (Hermitte 1999). Contributions that address such cosmopolitics of beyond-human solidarities, through ontological conflicts/frictions (Blaser 2013 ; Landivar & Ramilien 2015, 2017), are especially welcomed.
      Conveners: Dr. Jean Chamel (IHAR, Université de Lausanne), Ms. Bertrande Galfré (LESC, Université Paris Nanterre)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.20
      • 13:45 The “Natural” Winemakers and their ontological experiments 20'
        The disorders caused to the Earth by the overwhelming human activity is giving birth, in the beginning of this millennium, to a network of “natural” winemakers who do not fit the norms and who produce wines without using any synthetic chemicals on their vines or at any other time in the wine-making process. This network is strongly represented in France and is gradually spreading to the rest of the world’s vineyards. Although quite negligible in respect to the world’s wine production, the weight its presence carries in terms of myth and symbol (wine+nature) is significant. Through the experiments in their vineyards, these winemakers actively question their ability to adapt to “the Shock of the Anthropocene” (Bonneuil – Fressoz, 2013). To do so, they attempt to remediate life on Earth using knowledge stemming from the fields of science and of what I call in French the sensible and that we could call the “sensate” in English. Their local practices are rooted and adapted, and they converge with other global movements that redefine and reposition the relationship between the Earth and its inhabitants, whether human or non-human (Descola, 2005). Although each of them is shaping his or her own syncretism, they all agree that the fight against the dominant productivist model of the wine industry is an emergency.
        Speaker: Christelle Pineau (IIAC EHESS)
      • 14:05 The animal in the mirror : French antispeciesist activists and the shifting of a symbolic boundary 20'
        The category ""animal"" has been used by Western societies in order to create a symbolic boundary that isolates humans in a distinctive position. Today that category continues to represent something exterior to humans, but the boundary is not motionless: quite the opposite, it has shifted in a substantial way over the past decades. With the aim of understanding the recent changes in the perception of ""animals"" in France, I have conducted a field research within seven animal rights organizations in the region of Alsace, where activists are significantly active.
         
        With the support of ethnographic data, I will examine how the work of these organizations highlights the arbitrary nature of such a boundary, whether through rhetoric or with the activist’s own bodies, frequently chained or locked in cages. Moreover, activists often include ""animals"" in their notion of family, discovering in those marginal beings an identification sometimes not found with other humans. It is precisely through that identification that they find a way to express the feelings generated by the oppression they endure themselves. Thus, ""animals"" offer a mechanism to help activists deal with feelings that are simultaneously individual and shared.
        Speaker: Cristina Romanelli Rosa (Université de Toulouse Jean-Jaurès)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Constructing Solidarities through Historical Traces: P 16.2

      Room 3.134

      Solidarity is seen as a concept that bridges “diverse modes of practice, forms of sociality and mechanisms of envisioning future prospects for people's lives” (Rakopoulos 2016). This panel explores the complex relationships between historical traces and solidarities. Drawing from a range of traces including landscapes, material culture and bodies, we ask what kind of solidarities are afforded or hindered by the concept of trace. We see traces as knots of history with an ambiguous auratic presence, located between forgetting and memory, repression and amplification, metonymy and forgetting (Napolitano 2015). What kind of solidarities are made possible by the existence of traces? How productive are traces in enabling diverse practices of solidarity? What forms of sociality are bridged by traces and which ones are torn apart? How are forms of solidarity produced through encounters with trace? In what ways, are these “intimate” or kinship solidarities, or perhaps ones aligned to the nation state (Herzfeld 2016)? What are the points of tension or discord generated by particular solidarities? How are traces experienced and performed as part of future-making exercises? The panel invites speakers with a range of ethnographic material, including anthropologies of history, state, religion as well as museum and material culture. References: Herzfeld, M. (2016). The Intimate Solidarities of Religion in the City. History and Anthropology, 27(3), 265-272. Napolitano, V. (2015). Anthropology and traces. Anthropological Theory, 15(1), 47-67. Rakopoulos, T. (2016). Solidarity: the egalitarian tensions of a bridge‐concept. Social Anthropology, 24(2), 142-151.
      Conveners: Dr. Magdalena Buchczyk (Humboldt University), Dr. Zahira Aragüete-Toribio (University of Geneva), Dr. Aimee Joyce (University of St Andrews)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.134
      • 13:45 Creating solidarity among the local people living in an archaeological site: The case of Ban Chiang in Northeast Thailand 20'
        The purpose of this study is to examine the process of solidarity creation among the local people based on their relation with the relics excavated from Ban Chiang Archaeological site.
          This archaeological site is located in Northeast Thailand. It is a prehistoric settlement with funerary areas. Its discovery in 1966 was a sensational event for archaeologists and became a turning point for Ban Chiang history. Ban Chiang, during a short period of time, from an inconspicuous place as it had used to be before, has begun to attract attention of scholars and collectors worldwide. Its discovery has left a significant mark on villagers’ life and the effects have strengthen when the academic and historic value of the site have increased after the registration of Ban Chiang as the World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1992.
          In my presentation I will investigate how villagers transformed their attitude toward the relics in context of the rapid social changes taking places since the discovery. I will describe the process dividing it into three stages: before the discovery, after it, and the current situation. My report will be based on the data obtained during my fieldwork in Ban Chiang when I did interviews with the villagers gathering their opinions on the circumstances related to their possession of relics. In conclusion, I would like to analyze how the awareness of the cultural property has changed as a result of increasing solidarity emerged from mutual infiltration of individual experiences of the villagers and their collective memory.
        Speaker: Marie Nakamura (National Museum of Ethnology/Visiting Researcher)
      • 14:05 Solidarities of memory. Amateur genealogy in the present-day Poland 20'
        This paper concerns a phenomenon of amateur genealogy in the present-day Poland and societies of Polish roots. The overall objective is that increasing interest in the search of ancestors is related to specific ‘fashion” and the need for people’s own place in the so-called ‘Great History’. On this level, we can observe creating various real and virtual communities of memory, which created their own identities through archival historical traces and relics of the family past. From the perspective of cultural anthropology, the amateur genealogy responses to the identity crisis in the contemporary world and the process of democratization of the collective memory. In Poland, it took a significant form, resulting from the history of the Polish nation and still actual problems with social identification: resentment towards the noble past and, very often, the need for having gentry roots. On the other hand, more and more Poles decided to discover their family past and give a voice to their ancestors who were excluded from the traditional historiography: peasants, craftsmen, burghers etc. The first results of ethnographic research (carried out by using classical methods: interviews, participating observation, etc. as well as the virtual-ethnography) show that in Poland, amateur genealogy seems to be the mirror of Polish identity and the mythologized history. What is more, it is also a phenomenon reflecting the universal mechanisms of family and local memory as a unique system of narrations, on the basis of which solidarities of memory are being created.
        Speaker: Marta Raczyńska-Kruk (Jagiellonian University)
      • 14:25 Art of Memory: Polish Vernacular Artists Face the Holocaust 20'
        This paper presents results of the research about folk art objects made by vernacular artists from local communities in Poland after The Second World War. Some of researched works are talking about the Holocaust as seen from up close, from a “bystander’s” perspective. The oldest found example is a painting from (ca.) 1948 by Sławomir Kosiniak from Zalipie, recently discovered in the archives of the Kraków Ethnographic Museum, it presents the round-up of local Jews.The most recent work is ""Jedwabne"" by Jan Kowalczyk, commissioned by a German collector in 2017. An important role in the circulation of the objects was played by German collectors interested in dialog with Polish artists. All of the objects are traces in the European memory landscape. 
          
          The question is what do they actually depict? How should we look at them today? How did these works come about? Who made them, and why? Who bought, commissioned, and collected such scenes? Were they exhibited? For which audience? Why they could be seen as examples of difficult solidarity? 
          
          The fieldworks and analysis made by the team and also the exhibition in The Ethnographic Museum in Kraków were part of the research project Transmitting Contentious Cultural Heritages with the Arts: From Intervention to Co-Production: TRACES (2016-2019), implemented as part of the European Commission Horizon 2020 Reflective Society program.
        Speaker: Magdalena Zych (The Ethnographic Museum in Kraków/ Jagiellonian University)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Cultural Identity and Technological Privacy: P 18.2

      Room 2.99

      The cost/benefit analysis of free to use educational technology almost always results in EdTech adoption, since the benefits often come at no financial cost to the school or learner. However, privacy advocates have pointed out that users still “pay” for free EdTech programs; not with money, but with their information. This consideration for student and teacher data privacy has generated various policy changes and updates to student privacy laws across several countries. However, users in those same countries might see no issue with providing personal data in exchange for valuable programs, and not all countries have deemed such an exchange controversial. It is clear that cultural identity may influence perceptions and policies regarding student data privacy. Identity is an important idea in many disciplines. Anthropology, education, sociology, technology and other fields have highlighted national identities, ethnological identities, ethnic identities, cultural identities, social identities and self-identities. The current cross-culture and interdisciplinary identity research has demonstrated an interdisciplinary trend. Our panel discussion will focus on critical themes based on current cross culture and interdisciplinary identity research. The panel will discuss the relationship between identities and technology. Through the study of the relationship between these factors, we can explore the impacts and influences of technology on the identity. Both micro-qualitative research and macro-quantitative research findings will be discussed. Our panel will use the two critical themes mentioned above to generate intriguing conversations surrounding these issues. We are looking forward to new understandings of identity and technology privacy.
      Conveners: Ms. Amanda Potasznik (University of Massachusetts), Dr. Wenfan Yan (Beijing Normal University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.99
      • 13:45 A review of critical news coverage of educational technology privacy concerns in the United States 20'
        The introduction of Educational Technology in schools is often touted as an exciting benefit for students, and there is no shortage of laudatory press releases regarding EdTech company partnerships in public schools. On the other hand, investigative journalists reporting on educational news have labeled school administrators’ ceding of control within the educational sphere to technology companies as “Edutech Shiny Toy Syndrome,” stating that the true aim of those companies is “grabbing student and family data under the guise of ‘innovation’ and luring the next generation of addiction consumers” (Malkin, 2019). Google, Inc is also accused by children’s advocacy groups and lawmakers alike of violating COPPA (see governmental policy analysis section) since it keeps records of YouTube videos watched by each individual user who accesses the site, regardless of age (Ingram, 2018; Maheshwari, 2018). With these news events in mind, users may recognize that even if they closely read EULA/TOS and privacy policies for technological platforms and agree to the terms, there is nothing that guarantees the companies will abide by them. While much news coverage appears to be critical of EdTech, the continued success of educational technology companies in the United States seems to speak to a disregard by teachers and/or schools for such reports.
        Speaker: Amanda Potasznik (Umass Boston)
      • 14:05 Research on the Right to be Forgotten Under the Background of "Big Data" 20'
        Technological advances along with the extensive application of the search engines has provides precise and fast services for social participants who are searching for their target information. They brings considerable economic benefits to network operators simultaneously, thus promotes the development and progress of society. At the same time, under the background of big data, the widespread use of big database also brings about the negative effect. The complaint of citizens' personal information and materials divulge on the internet during the usage of big data often comes in. The protection of the right to be forgotten of common citizens is bound to become the inner pursuit of human rights protection in various countries; the victims should be given judicial remedy. The right to be forgotten is a kind of constitutional right, which can not be completely identified as the privacy right, or the right of personality. Once the right to be forgotten is infringed, ordinary citizens will be entitle to apply for judicial protection. Network operators should take the consequences of violating a treaty and are liable for breaching of contract. The primary tort liability and burden of proof are on operators. Of course, in consideration of public safety, fighting against terrorism, combating drug crime, the right to be forgotten should be limited within the reasonable bounds. That is, to establish the right of the network operators’ exemption from the law. The economic profit right of network operator, international public security and the citizen’s human rights should be balanced.
        Speaker: Dongxu Li (Ningxia Police Vocational College)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Clinical interpretations and ordinary lives: Stories from psychiatric anthropology: P 13.2

      Room 2.20

      This panel is an immersion in sensitive ethnographies that document contemporary engagements with mental health services and systems, psychiatric discourses, and therapeutic practices around the world. Writing about Iran, Orkideh Behrouzan (2016) draws attention to how the normalization of the psychiatric vernacular has engendered new ways of knowing, interpreting, and perceiving oneself and others in the world. A growing literature shows how nuanced ethnographies can illuminate local ‘ecologies of suffering’ (Jadhav et al, 2015:13) that can be used to inform and question constructions of mental health as global (Jain and Orr, 2016). Engaging with this, the panel will focus on specific ways that the psychotherapeutic language and practice penetrate the everyday life of people grappling not only with mental distress but also with the external ambiguities of how mental health and its ‘treatments’ are understood in their, and others’, societies. We aim to foreground the voices of variously situated actors who (struggle to) make sense of different mental states (their own and those experienced by others) against a landscape where mental health is positioned as global. We are interested in the stories of those who are engaged in ‘doing’ mental health through the ‘tinkering’ of acts of care (Moser, Mol 2010) – in clinics, homes, community centres, schools, centres for elderly people , primary care settings, and more. Focus is on how mental health is ‘done’ and what diagnostic categories ‘do’ (Mills and Hilberg, in press) in diverse sites around the world.
      Conveners: Dr. Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk (University of Warsaw), Dr. China Mills (University of Sheffield/City University London)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.20
      • 13:45 An innocent burst of energy or a state of insatnity requiring isolation? The Polish school children resolve the ambiguities of ADHD in everyday talk 20'
        Between 2015-2018, I worked on an ethnographic project about the Polish children’s experiences with ADHD diagnosis. My work was based in a middle size Polish town where I followed a few boys, some of them undergoing the diagnostic processes, some of them already holding an ADHD diagnosis. I observed them in various contexts – family, school and therapeutic spaces. In the two cases of boys holding the diagnosis, I undertook a couple months long participatory observation in the classrooms, which included conducting more focused conversations with the boys’ classmates (in smaller groups) using the participatory methods and the mosaic approach.
          
          This paper takes this conversational material as a starting point for the analysis of the ordinary lives of children and the ways in which the psychiatric vernacular penetrates them. I will show how the psy-sciences and medical and psychological practices provide new meanings that children can use while making sense of their lives, yet, also, I will bring to the front the ambiguity and uncertainty of such resource. I will argue that school children act in a vague landscape in which concepts like ADHD are made available to them, yet, their meaning remains obscure. In such a situation children take on themselves the task of ordering the reality by themselves, through conversations. Relying on the transcripts of specific, thematic interactions, I will portray children as actively engaged in negotiating various medical and non-medical interpretations of ADHD, as well as the practices that surround it (eg. pharmaceutical treatments). 
        Speaker: Dr. Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk (Instytut Etnologii i Antropologii Kulturowej, Uniwersytet Warszawski)
      • 14:05 Negotiating Autistic Space 20'
        The concept of autism represents a very broad range of behavioral, cognitive and sensory atypicalities. Attempts to consolidate this unstable category are normally the purview of cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists and geneticists. Yet similar efforts, to invest coherent meaning into this ambiguous label, are also made by autistic people themselves. This paper draws on fieldwork carried out at Autscape, a four-day conference and retreat organized annually in varying locations around England. The purpose of Autscape is to design a space where autistic people could feel comfortable and safe. Its organizers' means of realizing this goal is through heavy regulation of the social and sensorial environment, using colored badges and an elaborate set of rules of conduct. And yet reality, in all its messiness, complicates this ideal. The encounter between very different people who may share a label, but not necessarily much else, results in a constant negotiation between contradictory imaginaries of what an 'autistic space' should be. Autscape is thus more than a setting where autistic people can retire and socialise in preferable conditions. Nor is it merely a material and social design which affords individuals’ enactment of autistic selves. Rather, it is an ongoing project by which participants are impelled to consider their relation to the concept of autism as well as to those who share their label.
        Speaker: Dr. Ben Belek (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Imagining and Practising Solidarities in Urban Contexts [Sponsored by the Commission on Urban Anthropology]: P 26.2

      Room 3.131

      From sanctuary cities to urban social movements and community activism, cities across the world generate inspirational ideas and practices that challenge the effects of global social inequalities and environmental destruction. Many societies have a tradition of informal dynamics of solidarity. One thinks, on the one hand, of various kinds of charities but also of individual actions that are aimed to help poor urban dwellers. On the other hand, cities are also seedbeds of organized urban movements, which can be transnational in scope. We are looking for contributions which build on concrete projects and programmes, as well as on everyday practices of collaboration and solidarity in urban contexts, including case material and ethnographically-based analysis of: - Actions in support of the socially and economically disadvantaged, and politically marginalised; - Practices aimed at building cooperative relations in neighbourhoods among native and non-native residents; - Social activism and its potential political impact; - The construction of solidarity through heritage practices, including the social role of memory and of historical forms of cooperation; - The drive to creating more sustainable environmental futures. We are interested in forms of co-operation among different urban dwellers, which might extend to formal and informal forms of support and solidarity.
      Conveners: Dr. Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia), Dr. Giuliana Prato (University of Kent)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.131
      • 13:45 Social remittances as vehicles of solidarity among contemporary East European immigrants in Chicago 20'
        Urban settings are places where transnational social experiences and social remittances brought from oversees coexist among diverse immigrant communities and networks.
          I will try to explore social remittances (Levitt, Glick-Schiller 2004) and social capital (Vertovec 2009) brought to the host urban settings by the post-socialist immigrant workers as their lived experiences from overseas which become the basis for informal dynamics of solidarity. The Polish, Lithuanian, Ukrainian etc. East European immigrant inter-ethnic networks of reciprocity will be taken into focus by answering to the question - how the first generation of contemporary East European background Chicagoans are creating social spaces of solidarity based on moral standards as well as rules of conduct.
          Accumulation of reciprocal exchange of favors through networking of ‘friends of friends’ (Giordano 2012) was very well established practice under the former socialist system as a way of establishing interpersonal bonds of trust through which individuals solved their daily life problems by obtaining services, goods and resources Such systems of ‘informality‘ (Ledeneva 2018) forged into social capital become a bacground of East European immigrant solidarity. It is a kind of solidarity which could be seen as challenging ethnic enclaves and gentrified spaces of growing urban inequality.
          Such social remitances are able to reduce social inequalities in a new urban settings through re-creating social solidarity model of the former ‘socialist Eastern European area‘ constructed overseas. It is both immagined and practiced communalities which become enacted in Chicago as vehiles of inter-ethnic solidarity able to cope with social inequalities.
        Speaker: Prof. Vytis Ciubrinskas (Vytautas Magnus University)
      • 14:05 Grassroots urban activism in Slovakia: actions in support of democracy and socially and politically marginalized groups (The case of Banská Bystrica) 20'
        The paper aims at an ethnographic analysis of local forms of grassroots activism in a medium-size city of Banská Bystrica, Slovakia. It challenges some scholarly literature that focused on the weakness of civil society and the lack of civil engagement in Central and Eastern Europe. It brings an example of new urban activism in Slovakia, focusing on the role and practices of urban activist groups and volunteers, their place in strengthening democracy and civil society, and supporting marginalised groups in the society. The paper aims to provide a micro-level ethnographical insight into operations, activities and motivations of a local activist group „Not in Our Town“ (NIOT), which was created in 2013 as a civic movement against the results of regional elections in which a Neo-Nazi was elected as a regional governor. The NIOT movement has since developed numerous activities and practices with the objective to combat extermism and support solidarity with all marginalised groups in the region.
        Speaker: Dr. Alexandra Bitusikova (Matej Bel University)
      • 14:25 The State as a Solidarity Apparatus in U.S. Sanctuary Cities 20'
        Sanctuary cities have policies and government agency protocols for administering benefits and services to all people regardless of their immigration status. They also have protocols to limit the degree to which they assist immigration enforcement officials in deportations. Such policies developed as a result of decades of grassroots immigrant and refugee organizing and policy implementation oversight carried out by the ecumenical “sanctuary movement” and the immigrant rights movement. This paper examines how these movements in San Francisco, California have transformed the city government into a state apparatus that operates in solidarity with undocumented immigrants as well as one that aims to increase public solidarity with them. It will examine how this movement has infused the ethics of sanctuary, anti-deportation, and citizenship-blind access to local government services in city agency protocols, political discourse, and organizational culture. It will also show how the ideology of solidarity with immigrants in sanctuary cities has been mobilized to the contrary effort of helping immigration authorities deport certain categories of immigrants that the city deems to be unworthy of such government solidarity, namely "criminal immigrants."
        Speaker: Dr. Peter Mancina (University of Oxford, Centre for Criminology / Border Criminologies)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Beyond identities? Strategic solidarities in/of the political: P 9.2

      Room 3.44

      The late industrial condition features the entanglements of global and local, government and business, law and politics, nature and science. It embraces various social, cultural, political, economic and technical nested systems, which are all involved in multiple interactions (Fortun 2012). Effectively, the contemporary witnesses specific shifts in social movements, initiatives and events of various historically dispossessed subjects. Identity politics and political aims of formerly precisely defined social groups (e.g. indigenous people, women, the LGBT, workers, ecologists etc.), which for a long time shaped conventional types of activism, have recently given way to alternative political practices. This brought new forms of solidarities emerging at the intersections of previously distinct and (supposedly) distant social and political categories and identities. Thus, the political becomes an arena where more or less stable relations and affinities are being strategically forged to act for specific and elusive ideas of “social change.” In the process, “collective togetherness” of different temporal and spatial scales are being created (Dzenovska, De Genova 2018).
      Conveners: Dr. Monika Baer (University of Wroclaw), Dr. Anika Keinz (European University Viadrina)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.44
      • 13:45 How the Social Movement Actors Assess Social Change: An Exploration of the Dynamics and Consequences of Ukraine’s Local Maidan Protests 20'
        Social movements aim at social change, and scholars of sociology, political science and anthropology have long considered the question of how to assess their outcomes. In this paper, I contribute to arguments that, to better assess the potential change created by social movements, we need qualitative studies of the social movement actors who attempted to change their society. I explore the outcomes of the Maidan social movement in Ukraine, 2013-2014, and it’s relatively understudied regional aspect - the dozens of local Maidans in Ukraine’s cities, towns and villages, that issued own demands to local and national authorities. I present the results of a pilot study which covered 24 face-to-face interviews with 33 Maidan activists, representatives of local authorities and observers in four Ukrainian communities, held during September-November 2018. I compare four case study communities on local Maidan’s dynamics and impact. I found that the key outcomes of local Maidans concerned changes in the local political elites, and the broader consequences included a move towards greater transparency and accountability in policy-making, which highlights the entanglement of local and national in Ukrainian politics. My research also suggests how local-level political opportunity structures (POS) and social movements organizations (SMO) conditioned protest dynamics and outcomes: acting within their specific political and resource environments, local Maidan organizations served as platforms that got people together, nurtured identities (“We, the Maidaners” vs “Them”), developed social bonds and promoted further engagement into volunteer movement or entrance into politics.
        Speaker: Olha Zelinska (Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences)
      • 14:05 Practicing change. Activism and civic engagement as alternative political practices in Eastern Ukraine. 20'
        The future of civil society and prospective models of political development has been ongoing questions in Ukraine for years, especially after Euromaidan. Recent reforms may have led to a livelier public sphere, more active public debate and more intensive political participation, yet they seem to have done little to end the predatory and clientelistic practices of political elites. Meanwhile one of the most commonly used words to describe these times of transition is changing 'postsocialist mentality' into 'democratic' one (Riabchuk and Lushnycky 2009). All those staying behind are labelled as ‘not modern’, ‘not democratic’ and ‘not active’ – especially those living on eastern border. In my presentation I would like to show the phenomena of activism and civic engagement in Donbas monofunctional towns situated in Ukrainian government-controlled territory of the region. The influent external models of democratization create new modes of engagement functioning on intersection of foregoing and alluvial models of 'being a citizen', new patterns of adjustment to political and social reality and re-gaining agency. I intend to highlight actions of formal and semi-formal groups which forms of activism aim to create counter-spaces and counter-practices gradually and discreetly, so they actions often go unnoticed without ethnographic toolkit. I distance my point of research from classical understatement of 'social movement' (Touraine 1995, 2010) and turn instead to the meanings of ever-present commodification of the public space and counter-spaces understand as 'spaces occupied by the symbolic and the imaginary' or an 'initially utopian alternative to actually existing „real” space' (Lefebvre 1991).
        Speaker: Justyna Szymańska (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, University of Warsaw)
      • 14:25 Czech adoption of "housing first" policy through strategizing of a new type of policy actor 20'
        The idea that families and people in housing need should not be placed in shelters, but in standard housing with social work support originated in the USA. It has been gradually adopted by European actors, among others by the group of young academic activists from the Czech Republic. In my contribution I deal not only with the acceptability of policy that was categorized as too radical for many of the established actors but with the conditions of acceptability of new types of policy actors. Academic activists established an activist network campaigning for the right to housing and invited people in housing need to be members of the network. This further contributed to the perception of the policy being too "activist" even among some NGOs. The paper analyses how the network balances its activist and expert practice to influence actors in the field and contribute to the acceptability of the policy.
        Speaker: Dr. Hana Synková (University of Pardubice)
      • 14:45 Emotional spaces: Affective affinities as tools of resistance 20'
        In spite of conventional thinking, politics and emotions are closely related. As “discursive public forms” (Appadurai 1990), emotions may channel capillary power of governmentality, which leads people toward certain political ides, positionings and acts. At the same time, they may also initiate grassroots political pressures against subjects socially and/or politically legitimized in the field of power. Consequently, emotions both manipulate and motivate individuals to stage collective actions and thereby, create affective affinities in the sphere of political. Because politically driven initiatives are commonly aimed at or against particular forms of “change,” they also involve more or less thoroughly defined images of the future. Rooted in uncertainty, these anticipations frequently evoke anxiety and fear, but also open horizons of hope.
         
        
         
        In the proposed paper I discuss emotionally loaded narratives that accompanied a takeover of a couple of villages of the Dobrzeń Wielki commune by the city of Opole (PL). Both in a period when the commune’s partition was only anticipated future and when it was the actual fact, inhabitants’ engagement in different types of resistance was triggered by and brought forth various forms of affective affinities. In this context, I analyze how these workings of emotions shaped discursive practices in the field of political marked by conflicts and relations of power extending in different local and supralocal directions. I pay particular attention to interrelated anticipations of “the dark” and “the good” (Ortner 2016), which defined internal dynamics of the discussed emotional spaces always already oriented toward uncertain future.
        Speaker: Dr. Monika Baer (University of Wroclaw)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Young Adult Women and their Biological and Social Roles in Contemporary World: [Commission on Anthropology of Women]: P 20.2

      Room 3.45

      There is growing evidence for changing pattern of reproductive behaviour among young adult women aged 18-35. They are now more likely to remain childless, have their first child in their early/late 30s substantially limit the number of offspring and to be fully-paid working as compared to their peers over twenty five years ago. Yet, these women have to confront conflicting expectations at home and at the work place. Aiming at better understanding a work-home discrepancy (social vs biological roles), the panel discussion will focus on psychosocial constraints of women’s biology. Following issues will be discussed: the biological capacity of young women for pregnancy and motherhood; women’s multiple roles, psychosocial stress exposure and acute stress responses in women’s biology, health and quality of life; workplace conditions, systemic sexism, and how anthropology research is working and producing evidence that sexism impacts biology and hinders women’s progression in the work place. A multifactorial approach in cross-cultural research using different explanatory models should bring the framework for the final conclusion and recommendations.
      Conveners: Prof. Maria Agnieszka Kaczmarek (Adam Mickiewicz Univeristy), Dr. Ga Wu (YASS Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences HAO)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.45
      • 14:05 Nutritional status of women affected by severe stress caused by natural disaster. The case of West Bengal, India 20'
        Natural disasters may provide opportunities for natural experiment of the effects of exposure to stress on health and nutritional status of victims. The present study is a part of a major project to assess the effect of a severe cyclone, called Aila, on the development of children who were intrauterine on the very day of the disaster on 25 May 2009 in the Sunderban Islands of India. Data of 378 mothers were analysed. Among them, 185 were from the Islands worst affected Islands and the 193 (the controls) were from the area where there was no effect of the cyclone. Participants were recruited from all the primary schools on the two Islands of the Sunderban area and the control data from the rural primary schools of the adjacent district. The populations were matched in respect of the origin, culture and language. Mothers and their children underwent a battery of anthropometric measurements and were asked to fulfil several questionnaires. Mother did not differ in age at menarche, education level and knee height. Also their husband’s education did not differ between groups. Mothers affected by Aila had smaller BMI and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC), controlling for age, level of education, family size, family income, and level of experienced stress in last year assessed by the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. In conclusion, a severe stress caused by natural disaster had long lasting effect on women’s nutritional status and probably raised their sensibility and made hyperreactivity to stress conditions.
        Speaker: Prof. Slawomir Koziel (Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences)
      • 14:25 Body structure and age of maturation of Warsaw girls and women (9-19 years old) in 2003 and 2013. 20'
        The purpose of this work was to assess changes in body structure and age of maturation of Warsaw girls during the decade 2003-2012 in relation to socio-economic factors. The material consisted of 830 girls studied in 2003 and 381 girls studied in 2012-13, aged 9-19 years. Parents and their daughters took part in the questionnaire. The family characteristics included: parental education and profession, number of children, self-assessment of physical activity, playing sports, stress at home and at work, number of daily meals. The girls were asked about the exact age at which the menarche occurred (retrospective method). Measurements included: height, weight, arm circumference, subcutaneous fat folds on arm, subscapular and abdominal. To eliminate the differences with age, “z" scores were used. T-Student, Mann-Whitney U, Chi-squared tests and ANOVA were applied. The results showed that girls examined in 2013 had greater BMI and arm circumference than girls studied in 2003. Girls examined in 2003 consumed 3 meals, while girls examined in 2013 consumed more than 3 meals a day. In 2003 girls had lower weight and smaller arm circumference in bigger families; less BMI when parents had higher education and better profession and smaller arm circumference when the level of stress was higher. In 2012 girls were taller in families where parents had better education and occupation and they had less subcutaneous fat tissue being more physically active and living in grater families. There was no relationship between socio-economic characteristics and age of maturation.
        Speaker: Prof. Anna Siniarska (Faculty of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Islands Ethnography: Reflecting “islandness” in the anthropocene: P 28.2

      Room 3.129

      "In recent years, islands have experienced a hype in various research areas: flight and migration (Bachis 2016; Nimführ 2016; Mountz 2011), tourism (Wang 2017), ecology – with special reference to climate change, interspecies, and «friction» in the Anthropocene (Tsing 2005) – heritage making (Bujis 2016, Welz 2017), island cities and urban archipelagos (Grydehøj 2015) etc. Furthermore, there is an increased scientific interest on various forms of solidarities within islands and beyond them (e.g. Guribye & Stalsberg Mydland 2018; Reckinger 2013). The objectives of the proposed panel are three-fold: 1) to link research interests that address the historical and/or current discourses on “islandness” and geographical location, (political) dependence, resource management, energy transition and ecology, as well as sociocultural forms of island life; 2) to develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks that can be used to build common approaches for research on and about islands, and 3) to promote and facilitate discussion, information exchange and cooperation between ‘island researchers’ at European and international level. This panel, therefore, invites scientists, who work on islands or are doing research about islands, to give insights on their island research. These can deal with the special features, challenges and opportunities of the island both content analytical and method-theoretical. Likewise, questions of comparison, in which differences, similarities and intertwines of island research are worked out, can be analysed. The session is open to contributions that focus more specifically on issues impacting on islands and island life as well as on methodological issues in research on and about islands.
      Conveners: Dr. Francesco Bachis (University of Cagliari), Ms. Greca N. Meloni (University of Vienna), Mr. Sarah Nimführ (University of Vienna)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.129
      • 13:45 Insularity or Cultural Identity: Natives and Migrants in Jeju Island, Korea 20'
        Jeju Island, introduced at fist in the name of Quelpart to the West, is located below the southernmost tip of the Korean Peninsula. Islandness is characterized by relative isolation and limitation in size. This paper deals with the islandness, giving examples of what an anthropologist from the mainland experienced when moving into Jeju Island in 1984. The limited size of an island community leads to a fixed moving period of Jeju Island once in a year. When a certain product was not available in Jeju Island, the responses of Jeju storekeepers showed isolation from the mainland. The question about one’s hometown has revealed a salient classification in everyday life among Jeju people, that is, the distinction between natives and mainlanders as migrants. People in and from the mainland are significant others and outsiders to Jeju natives. Jeju natives have an ideology that Jeju culture must be distinct from mainland culture, regardless of similarity and continuity between two cultures. Generally speaking, the so-called peripheries such as islands limit their claim for cultural autonomy to a condemnation of the processes of transformation and progress in them. The symbolic boundaries between the island and the mainland such as insularity and the perception of their asymmetric relationship have constructed Jeju cultural identity as discourse.
        Speaker: Dr. Yoo Chul-in (Jeju National University)
      • 14:05 Differential wastages: an anthropological analysis of garbage's governance in Sicily 20'
        In anthropocene, problems and opportunities related to the waste cycle can be thought of as ""total social facts"" that interconnect different areas, plans and levels of human action. These issues involve the deployment of resources of a technical-organizational, economic and legal, as well as cognitive, political and socio-cultural type. Furthermore, with increasing force, waste is shown to be a cultural and social product that is politically active both in the local and global arena (Honor Fagan 2003, Alliegro 2018), thus offering anthropology new angles from which to observe and understand the present.
          Through the analysis of the administrative and judicial history of a toxic waste disposal landfill located in Melilli (Sr) - a Sicilian municipality which is home to one of the largest petrochemical industrial poles in Europe - the paper aims to analyze the system of waste governance operating in Sicily, considering it representative of a more general state of environmental and economic crisis that crosses the islands. For over twenty years this system has been based on continual and urgent procedures that have made the emergency an endemic feature. The establishing of an emergency model has often offered fertile ground for infiltration by organized crime and the implementation of administrative corruption practices. The set of actors, procedures, resources, values and interests that revolve around the waste cycle allows to highlight the ways in which economic trends acting on a global scale are reconfigured in specific island contexts producing effects on the lives of individuals and communities.
        Speaker: Irene Falconieri (University of Catania)
      • 14:25 Indigenous island life in time of cruise ship tourism development: opportunities, changes, challenges 20'
        The Isle of Pines is a part of the archipelago of New Caledonia which is a special collectivity of France. The economic development of the Isle of Pines is related to the general tendencies in the territory, whose economy is based on the mineral resources of New Caledonia. In places without nickel deposits tourism is seen as a lever for sustainable development. Nevertheless, high living costs and lack of cheap flights make the Caledonian tourism sector structurally inefficient. In result, this destination is more expensive than the other archipelagos of the South Pacific and therefore less attractive in the eyes of tourists (Gay 2009). Cruise tourism appears then as an alternative to hotel tourism (LeFevre 2007). Present on the coasts of the Isle of Pines for over thirty years and for more than a hundred days per year, the large ships and their passengers have become an important component of the tourist landscape of this Melanesian island. However, the indigenous Kanak community has a desire to strike a balance between their traditions and development of tourist activities. As tourism development brings many social, economic and political changes, the presentation – based on the ethnographic research which have been led in New Caledonia since 2014 – will examine the consequences of expansion of cruise ship tourism on the Isle of Pines. How is it managed on a customary indigenous island territory? What is the state of its development on the island and what challenges lie ahead?
        Speaker: Karolina Kania (Centre d'étude des mouvements sociaux (CEMS), École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS))
      • 14:45 "Earth care, people care and fare share" in Sardinia 20'
        This paper presents some reflections on a network of people living in Sardinia (some native and some from continental Italy) composed of families, single men and women who are all related to (as associates, as supporters, or simply friends of…) the Sardinia Permaculture Association (SarPA). Their experiences and life-choices will be analyzed ethnographically as a community of practice which incorporates specific self-representations at the intersection of a range of dichotomies: human/natural environment; global/local; economic growth/degrowth, speed/slowness; individualism/community; separation/inclusion and finally indifference/solidarity. This network is rooted specifically in the permaculture tree ethic of “earth care, people care and fare share”, in the enhancement of the island history and culture in terms of traditional heritage, regarding both knowledge and ""culture of relations""(solidarity and support described as typical to the island).
          The activities of the network encourage people in the island and also the offspring of former emigrants to return to take care of the land of their ancestors. The specificity of SarPa often emerges in discursive construction of “insularity” as a positive value in contrast to “continentalness”. The insular specificity of SarPa, it is claimed, promotes a captivating model of relations between the human and the non-human, advocating more ethical and just attitudes towards both. This model creates an attractive factor for continental Italians (as a specific kind of lifestyle migrants) who decide to reverse the more usual migratory flow (from the island to the continent).
        Speaker: Dr. Maria Giovanna Cassa (University of Brescia)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Local Nature Using in the 21st ctntury: Global Responsibility and Solidarity [Commission on the Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development]: P 4.2

      Room 2.104

      Anthropologists and other scholars have documented very different views of human relationships with nature in different societies with diverse cultures. Indigenous people have been displaced by immigrants with a different survival strategy who have destroyed the nature on which the local people survived. They had used their environment carefully and preserved it for generations. International law supports the claims of indigenous people to their territories and resources, which are sought after by powerful corporations and their governmental supporters. Quite often new technologies assist actively in producing great changes in local landscape and biodiversity, in the areas involved into process of industrial reconstruction. The cultures of local indigenous people support not just their own lives but also all the rest of peoples by taking care of the survival of the environments that they protect. Anthropologists can help to sustain the environment by solidarity with indigenous people and their environments with education but also with international law. In this panel, both theoretical and empirical papers will discuss perspectives on the realization of a process of education on Sustainability for reducing risks in strategies of Nature-Society relationships.
      Conveners: Dr. Viacheslav Rudnev (Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology), Dr. Dorothy Billings (Wichita State University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.104
      • 13:45 Rethinking the internal and external prospects of the pastoral community of Sauze di Cesana, Italy 20'
        The territory of the ancient municipality of Sauze di Cesana, in the upper Susa Valley, province of Turin. This alpine zone lies within the Occitan Valleys of Piedmont, where autochthonous languages ascribed to the Occitan language, as defined under Italian Law 482/1999, are spoken. The good practices and living customs of the herders of Sauze were presented at the MILAN EXPO 2015. Particularly appreciated was their sense of giving pride of place to the territory as the safeguard of the rural economy and its inhabitants. They link this awareness to worshipping at the thirteenth-century cemetery Church of San Restituto (XII°century). Between 2015 and 2019, as a reaction to climate change, the foundations have been laid for rethinking the internal and external prospects of this specific rural community, without altering its environment.
        Speaker: Prof. Renata Freccero (University of Turin Italy)
      • 14:05 Medicine Wheel – Indigenous Knowledge 20'
        As elder said “disease or illness affects all of us, not just the one
         
        person”. The medicine is to prevent such or to bring that harmony
         
        and balance back to the circle.
         
        All plants, trees, and natural substance are grouped in four
         
        directions of a medicine wheel, which becomes a guide for healers.
         
        Then healers ask the plants a permission to use them as to treat
         
        people.
         
        Healing is not just based on a treatment; it is based on a way of
         
        bringing a person into harmony and balance with body, mind and
         
        environment. People respect plants, birds, animals, nature.
         
        Nature has an influence on American Indians treatment. Treatment
         
        is based on four cardinal directions ,which are part of
         
        a Medicine Wheel.
         
        The “life values” in each of the four Directions are as follows. If you
         
        look at the Medicine Wheel, it has four quadrants. Four is a sacred
         
        number for native people. Four directions, four races of people, four
         
        seasons, four cycle of life.
         
        The traditional idea of medicine is based on the earlier
         
        meanings of the four cardinal directions of the Universal Circle.
         
        Cherokee frame the meanings of the Four Directions as Spiritual in
         
        the East, Natural in the South, Physical in the West, and Mental in
         
        the North.
         
        For example: a dandelion belongs to East, West, North and South
         
        medicine. The compound infusion of root is taken to produce
         
        post partum milk flow. American Indian Healers use decoction of
         
        young leaves of a plant for menstrual cramps.
        Speaker: Dr. Zhanna Pataky (Butler college)
      • 14:25 Indigenous Women's Health Knowledge 20'
        Indigenous Women's Health Knowledge
          
          Human biology has cast women in care giving roles (parturition, nourishment, safeguarding infants and children, and often caring for the ill) in their familial, tribal and wider communities. Keen observation led to the acquisition and use of various remedies derived from the surrounding ecosystems, and to a division between providing physical remedies versus spiritual treatments. This indigenous health knowledge was passed through generations of women, even in cultures whose designated healers were male. Using detailed knowledge of their environment and aggregated knowledge of herbal treatments, women have sustained populations over many generations. When their cultures are not sustained, or their natural environments are significantly altered, that knowledge is lost. In this paper, I will explore the female roots of South Asian Ayurvedic medicine, the local ecosystem-derived medicines used by female practitioners of Tibetan medicine (before 1920), and the knowledge of an Italian village ""herb woman"" of the late 19th and early 20th century.
        Speaker: Leslie Page (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists)
      • 14:45 Problem of garbage reflected in Russian botnets: the newest Internet Technologies and global responsibility 20'
        In traditional Anthropology garbage is seen as a way of tracing territorial boundaries for a specific social community.1 In the 21st century when ecological problems become more challenging, the problem of waste utilization came to a different level. Now it is not only within the scope of responsibility of a specific local community, but a part of global responsibility in the process of recreation of vital resources for all humanity, taking into account strategic way of sustainable development.
          Modern technologies of internet communications offer vast possibilities for education and mobilization of citizens to solve the problem of garbage.
          Authors make a review of social media groups in the 'VKontakte' social network, which create posts related to the public fights against unauthorized waste disposals and introduction and widespread of garbage recycling practices.
          New internet technologies are being used to solve this problem. They include botnets in social networks – automatized programs, capable to transmit information with high speed and effectiveness (also due to the imitation of real users` practices). Authors analyze performance of two botnets operating in 'Vkontakte` during 2018. Botnets considerably increase possibility of attracting user`s attention to the problems such as unauthorized waste disposals in Leningrad region, ecological consequences of garbage storage creation in Moscow region. Such botnets can be considered as a form of social initiative to solve both global and local ecological problems.
          _________________________________________________
          1-The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project № 18-011-00988 ‘The bot-space structure of online social networks: network analysis’
        Speaker: Prof. Valeria Vasilkova (St. Petersburg State University)
      • 15:05 Traditions of ecological culture of Siberian villagers: a look from the past to the present 20'
        The ecological culture of rural residents of Siberian villages remains an unexplored topic. The question is how has the attitude towards the natural environment and ways of exploiting natural resources changed since the time of the resettlement of Russians and other East Slavic peasants to the Siberian region, i.e. over 300 years. Field studies show that the formation of environmental management traditions occurred at all stages of the development of the region. Relations with nature in the XVIII-XIX centuries wеre a twofold character. On the one hand, the need to resist natural and climatic conditions gave rise to faith in the inexhaustibility and infinity of the riches of nature, on the other hand, a whole series of prohibitions were imposed that limited the human impact on it. In the report, the authors would like to disclose the content and motivations of traditional prohibitions related to the impact on nature, so that its stocks are renewed. In addition, we aim to trace how the transition in 21 century to capitalism and to the information society (an abundance of media products on ecology, mass tourism, network groups) has affected the ecological culture of modern Russian villagers and their ethno-cultural identity. An assessment of the current state of the ecological culture of rural residents of Eastern Siberia is given.
        Speaker: Dr. Elena Fursova (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 The Intersections of Tourism, Migration, and Exile [Commission on the Anthropology of Tourism & Commission on the Anthropology of Migration]: P 25.2

      Room 2.123

      "The aim of the panel is to explore the intersecting terrain between the varied forms of spatial mobility. Our goal is to problematize the seemingly-fixed boundaries separating tourism, migration, and exile. We invite scholars interested in discussing how these mobilities intertwine, overlap and influence one another. Such intersections are multidimensional and multidirectional: migrants and established exiles can act as tourists; refugee communities might be the tourist attractions; migrants often work as laborers and entrepreneurs in the tourism sector; tourists, on the other hand, turn into migrant-entrepreneurs in the tourism sector or combine tourism with work. While tourism, migration and exile are usually researched and theorized separately, we believe that transcending the categorical boundaries within the anthropology of mobility and considering how differentiated distributions of power permeate them will contribute to social critiques of the way various forms of mobility are conceptualized in public discourses related to gender, class, ethnic, racial, and global inequalities (e.g. tourists from the Global North as cosmopolitan nomads versus migrants from the Global South as intruders). We hope that through deconstructing the conceptual foundations of these moral valorizations of people’s movement will enable us to built world solidarities with those whose movement is restrained. We are interested in both empirical case studies and discussions exploring how the above intersections enable us to deconstruct dichotomous classifications within mobility studies (tourists vs. migrants, migrants vs. refugees, leisure vs. work, voluntary vs. forced migration, etc.)."
      Conveners: Dr. Natalia Bloch (Warsaw University), Prof. Kathleen M. Adams (Loyola University Chicago)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.123
      • 13:45 Imagined “Asian” Solidarities in a Global City-State: Asianism of Japanese Migrant Workers in Singapore 20'
        “Asian” is a versatile phrase for politicians, mass media, tourist industry, and self-identified Asian peoples themselves. It could evoke forged solidarity, commercialized nostalgia, self-affirmation or something else. The semantic layers of “being Asian” are notably thick in Singapore, i.e., a global city embracing multiethnic Asian (and non-Asian) workers and a state where Asianism is constantly used for governmental campaigns. Based on qualitative research on Japanese migrant workers in Singapore who once lived in the West in search of cosmopolitan self-image, this paper explores what “being Asian” newly delivers to their self-identification. The paper argues that Japanese migrant workers first equate Singapore with “Asia” in general in a touristic gaze, but later adopt “Asian” self-identification and solidarities with Singaporeans and other Asians, along with the therapeutic effects that cure traumatic memories of being discriminated in the West. The Japanese migrants’ joyous self-discovery as Asians makes a contrast to Singaporeans’ distanced perception that “being Asian” is void, that it is a mere governmental slogan or labelling on them by Westerners. However, by finding themselves as Asians, the Japanese migrants paradoxically retrieve their identification as cosmopolitans, most of whom finding Singapore or Asia not the place to settle down. As a whole, this paper elucidates illusionality and temporality of Asian solidarity, and its customized use by mobile individuals in the age of globalization.
        Speaker: Dr. Etsuko Kato (International Christian University)
      • 14:05 Travellers and migrants in the discourse on Torajan funeral ceremonies 20'
        "Torajan traditional culture has been studied extensively. For over half a century the region has been frequently visited by foreign tourists, travellers, anthropologists, journalists, and artists. Moreover, Toraja has been heavily influenced by migration, especially in the outward direction, since numerous people of Torajan descent live outside their homeland.
          My aim is to present the dynamics between local communities and foreign visitors within the discourse on the lavish funeral tradition (Rambu Solo’), because it is one of the most emblematic ethnic markers of Toraja (Adams, 1984) that transformed in the context of tourism and migration (Adams 1993, 1999; Yamashita 2003). Ritual actors (Grimes, 2014) who are interested in Torajan funerals represent different religious, ethnic, and national identities. The demarcation line between local and foreign actors is blurred, and therefore I would like to pay special attention to voices located in-between, to utterances of emigrants visiting their home in order to attend funerals, government officials, and tour guides.
          The presentation is a part of a larger project on the discourses around three Indonesian religious rituals (Waisak, Pujawali, Torajan funerals). The project is both, empirical and textual. For over last two years, I have been conducting field research around these events, among others, I studied 10 particular mortuary ceremonies. While examining the emigrants’ perspective, a memoir by Tino Saroengallo (2008) was crucial for my analysis."
        Speaker: Anna Marta Maćkowiak (Institute for the Study of Religions, Jagiellonian University in Krakow)
      • 14:25 Migrants’ music: an ethnography aboard long distance buses 20'
        This paper is based on an ethnography conducted from winter to summer 2019 at a migrants’ reception center in Bayonne (South-West of France) and aboard long distance buses between Bayonne and Paris. As an ethnologist, I argue that paying attention to sound and music can help us to reconsider the separation between tourism, migration and exile.
          In France, the bus transport sector was liberalised in 2015 by the Macron law, named after the then Minister of Economy Emmanuel Macron. Since then, ""Macron buses"" have been travelling around France and Europe at low prices, disrupting the market of transport and modifying representations of mobility. Today, people considered as « migrants » or « tourists » are taking the same buses.
          In November 2018, Bayonne's long-distance bus terminal moved from the city centre to the entrance of the new Pausa migrants’ reception centre, a stopover point managed by local associations where migrants crossing the border with Spain can sleep, eat and rest before continuing their journey north. Will the bus terminal stay in front of the centre at the end of July, when Bayonne welcome more than one million people for its annual Ferias ? In other words, will Bayonne be able to welcome both those considered as « tourists » and those considered as « migrants » ? Will some Pausa migrants become touristic (musical) entrepreneurs ? In fact, some of them decided to stay at Pausa, reconfiguring its initial purpose to be a transitional place.
        Speaker: Claire Clouet (EHESS)
      • 14:45 Polish diaspora in Armenia - migration and tourism 20'
        "The Polish Diaspora is one of the smallest ethnic groups in Armenia. This minority, composed of about 300 people, has a significant impact on Armenian tourism. In my speech, I will present the results of field studies focusing on the Polish minority in Armenia and answer the question of why tourism has played an important role in Polish diaspora organizations?
          Poles over the years have been involved in the development of Polish-Armenian contacts, as well as ambassadors of Polish culture in their place of residence. This influence means even unflagging interest in learning Polish at Armenian universities, as well as the Dendrological Park in Stepanavan, founded by Edmund Leonowicz. This park is currently a well-known tourist attraction commonly associated with the Polish activity in Armenia. The current Polonia organizations are involved in the promotion of Poland, but also in Armenia. They are double ambassadors. They advertise Armenian culture in Poland by organizing music and dance concerts in many Polish cities. In addition, some of them work in tourism. They organize tours around Armenia for Polish tourists, but also for tourists from Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine. An important role of the organization has become mutual promotion. It can even be said that tourism has become almost as important as dealing with Polish-American affairs and promoting Polish culture.
          In the presentation, I will present the growing importance of tourism for two Polish organizations. On their basis, I will present the discussed process and answer the question posed."
        Speaker: Ewelina Ebertowska (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań)
    • 13:45 - 15:30 Beyond the Politics of Disregard: Charting the Affective Histories of Post/Colonialism: P 10.2

      Room 3.19

      This panel proposes a conceptualization of the histories of colonialism and postcolonialism as affective histories, taking affect and emotion as analytical starting points. Emotions are not irrational or solely private phenomena but social processes that can shed light on the socio-structural conditions that produce them.Colonial governance shaped people’s intimate ecologies and was underpinned by a politics of disregard. As Stoler(2009:236) has noted, “disdain, desire, and disaffection for thoughts and things native were basic to the colonial order of things”. Resentment, hate, shame, anger, and fear saturated the lived inequities of colonial relations. Simultaneously, however, these inequities produced transgressive/subversive emotional responses in the form of anger, resilience, courage, and solidarity, which form part of an alternate colonial archive or a politics of “decolonial love” (Sandoval 2000).If disregard and disavowal were integral to the edifice of colonialism, and anger, love and resilience to its dismantling, what are the dispositions and emotions characterizing the so-called ‘postcolonial’ present? We welcome presentations that investigate the silences and omissions at the heart of politics of disregard, which continues to permeate the postcolonial order, whether in policy-making and governance, cultural production and consumption, migration, or tourism encounters.Furthermore, we are interested in examinations of practices and policies that draw on the affective tradition of decolonial love and attempt to go beyond disregard, as a means of combatting coloniality and cultural dominance.We invite papers that chart the troubled emotional landscape of the postcolonial present, without dismissing colonial durabilities or contemporary instances of the neo/colonial present in Europe and beyond.
      Conveners: Dr. Alexandra Oanca (University of Amsterdam), Dr. Daniela Franca Joffe (University of Hull), Dr. Laura Pozzi (University of Warsaw)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.19
      • 13:45 Fears, Anxieties, and Imperial Swagger: Soft Power and the (re)Making of the European Union’s Cultural Diplomacy 20'
        This presentation analyzes the emergence of the EU’s cultural diplomacy and the growing institutionalization of a common EU cultural foreign policy starting with early 2000s. The potential of cultural diplomacy in advancing European foreign policy goals and promoting EU’s “soft power” has been advocated by a coalition of influential cultural organizations such at the European Cultural Foundation (ECF) and the European Union National Institutes for Culture (EUNIC) network, and national cultural institutes and arm’s length cultural associations of large and powerful EU member states, such as the Goethe-Institut, Institut-Français, and the British Council. I argue that the fears and anxieties of Europe’s declining cultural influence - coupled with concerns over the prowess of emerging powers such as Brazil, India, and China - were the stepping stones for the emergence of the EU’s cultural diplomacy. These fantasies and anxieties were magnified by national institutes of culture and European cultural organizations and platforms. This paper analyzes what sorts of structures of feeling and subjectivities the EU apparatus calls forth in a (formally) post-colonial present. I argue that European policy actors and the EU are attempting to simultaneously know and not know its colonial history, to repress and reframe, to suppress and remember, to ignore and acknowledge. EU cultural diplomacy and its proponents are caught between these two conflicting demands, while being positioned within a broader policy field that valorizes the strengthening of the EU as a global actor and the promotion of its soft power.
        Speaker: Dr. Alexandra Oanca (University of Amsterdam)
      • 14:05 When post-colonialism and neoliberalism meet: precarity amongst South Asian scholars in Europe 20'
        Drawing on an ethnographic research on Indian social scientists building a career in Europe, this papers discusses the case of academic lives being built in an situation of "indefinite mobility". As "international mobility" becomes a keyword in scientific policies, "young scholars" are led to a peripatetic life in the context of a dominant model of employability based on temporary contracts in different institutions and countries. At a time of academic precarity, these researchers seek to build not only a career but also a life, in all its dimensions, "on the road." In this presentation, I discuss the relations between contemporary transformations in the academic field and their reverberations in the construction of life projects, subjectivities and emotions amongst Indian scholars who seek a stable life in Europe. To that end, I start from the following findings: (a) the existence of feelings of anguish in view of the impossibility of professional stability, which in its turn muddles certain notions of intimate and political life; (b) the sense of "failure" as a logic of self-management in an academic context permeated by discourses of excellence and productivity; and (c) the fear shared by my interlocutors, born into stable middle-class families, of a kind of downward mobility. In sum, this paper brings together post-colonialism and neoliberalism in order to understand how the first is appropriated by the later in order to understand new modes of management of emotions in the context of subjectivation of precarity and resignification of life projects.
        Speaker: Vinicius Ferreira (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales)
      • 14:25 Commodification, Community and Post/Colonialism: Attitudes and emotions surrounding organ and tissue donation among a group of African Caribbean people in the UK 20'
        This paper stems from ethnographic fieldwork carried out in an African Caribbean Community Centre in a diverse and deindustrialising British city in 2017, before the scale of the Windrush immigration scandal was revealed and felt. It seeks to examine how post/colonial collective memory, mistrust and lived experience of sustained disregard across at least three generations influence community members’ attitudes towards and intentions surrounding organ and tissue donation. Drawing initially on Mauss, I argue that the ‘gift-giving’ metaphors employed in campaigns to increase donation amongst the black British population fail to take account of long histories of post/colonial abuses of and disdain for black bodies and their inhabitants, as well as repeated exclusion from ‘the whole’ population, declared to be bound together by reciprocal relationships of gift-giving and compassion. I suggest that such discussions and campaigns should be approached with honest and open recognition of these realities which cannot but affect the highly emotionally charged, and, in these circumstances, entirely rational decision of whether to donate one’s organs, rejecting the narratives of superstition, irrationality and ‘illegitimate’ interpretation of religious texts frequently employed around this topic, particularly in grey literature produced by the NHS.
        Speaker: Catherine Eleanor Lucy Hodge (University College London)
      • 14:45 "Agitadoras" Weaving Solidarity and Autonomous Alliances 20'
        Trajectories tell a lot of how women do activism together in a group called Mujeres Creando. Facing change and continuity in Bolivia’s contemporary political scenario, this feminist social movement forged strong alliances and weaved a fabric of solidarity among women of diverse identities, social classes, ethnic groups, and other kinds of difference. Founded in 1992 by three women, María Galindo, Julieta Paredes and Mónica Mendoza, Mujeres Creando has established its roots in La Paz and Santa Cruz de la Sierra, two major Bolivian cities, where it activates women’s everyday lives as a vital element of its practice, described as creative and based in callejera (street-oriented) actions. In this paper I try to show how affections along trajectories, solidarity and political fight strategies for social change are entangled in this particular context, by describing some of the group members trajectories and how they are related to their political action. Pursuing the utopia of social change, they choose “to be happy as a revenge” because of their belief that one can only make a difference when one “undo the world’s order and then create new relations”. Therefore, political actions as graffiti, expositions, protests, interviews, performances, movies, and many more are meant to disturb routine in order to create new ones.
        Speaker: Bruna Rossetti Mendonça (Unicamp - Universidade Estadual de Campinas)
      • 15:05 Thou shalt not be angered?: The (de)politicisation of rage and emotion in selected press' coverage of the #ShutDown protests 20'
        Zimbabwe a former colony of Britain is a country with a deep history of ethnic violence. Under 38 years of Mugabe's rule, the country was plunged into a deep economic crisis. Mugabe who was ousted in 2018 through a Mnangangwa plotted a coup, foretold further injustices under the new regime. In January 2019, Mnangagagwa announced that fuel prices would go up by 300%. This resulted in a stay away accompanied by protests by some sections of the public. This looting has been constructed as an act of hooliganism or thievery by some politicians and media. Such coverage fails to account for the rage and emotion and the context in which it occurred; as a rebellion towards the worsening economic crisis. Using a critical discourse analysis of texts in the Herald, Daily News and The Chronicle, we seek to examine how the coverage of these protests and looting (de) politicises rage and emotion. We conclude to say, the media in some instances fail to account for the current and historical contexts of the protest. Theoretically, I employ the concepts of rage, affect and emotion as lenses with which to contexualise these protests.
        Speaker: Kudzaiishe Vanyoro (Wits Centre for Diversity Studies)
    • 15:30 - 16:00 Coffee break
    • 16:00 - 17:30 IUAES Commissions Business Meetings
      • 16:00 Anthropology and Education 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 1.44 )
      • 16:00 Aging and the Aged (Aging and the Life Course) 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 1.43 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Food and Nutrition 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 1.63 )
      • 16:00 Ethnic Relations 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Music, Sound and Bodily Performative Practices 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.4 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Tourism 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.21 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology, Peace and Human Rights 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.98 )
      • 16:00 Global Transformations and Marxian Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.103 )
      • 16:00 Human Rights 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.104 )
      • 16:00 Indigenous Knowledge and Sustainable Development 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.122 )
      • 16:00 Legal Pluralism 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.124 )
      • 16:00 Marginalization and Global Apartheid 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.3 )
      • 16:00 Medical Anthropology and Epidemiology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.4 )
      • 16:00 Museums and Cultural Heritage 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.20 )
      • 16:00 Nomadic Peoples 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.44 )
      • 16:00 Primatology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.45 )
      • 16:00 Theoretical Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.46 )
      • 16:00 Urban Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.66 )
      • 16:00 Urgent Anthropological Research 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.67 )
      • 16:00 Visual Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.68 )
      • 16:00 Migration 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.92 )
      • 16:00 Linguistic Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.93 )
      • 16:00 Bioethics 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.94 )
      • 16:00 Documentation 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.95 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology and the Environment 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.106 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of HIV & Aids 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.130 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Children, Youth and Childhood 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.131 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of the Middle East 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.132 )
      • 16:00 Enterprise Anthropology 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.133 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Risk and Disaster 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.134 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Sports 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.135 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Mathematics 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.136 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology of Women 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.138 )
      • 16:00 Intangible Cultural Heritage 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 2.123 )
      • 16:00 Anthropology, Public Policy and Development Practice 1h30' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.129 )
    • 18:00 - 22:15 Audiovisual session in Zamek
      Convener: Dr. Jan Lorenz (UAM Poznan)
      Location: Zamek Cultural Centre, Święty Marcin street 80/82, Poznań
      Material: Map link
      • 18:00 At the Crossroads/Original title: Kahan Ka Raasta 48'
        Nestled in the Himalayan range of Uttarakhand in India, Kalap may soon have a motorable road. Till then the village continues to be 10 kilometres uphill on foot from the nearest road.
         
        The film delves into the lives of the people of Kalap, who for generations have been negotiating their own path for sustainable living. With increasingly easy access to the world beyond, will there be a gradual shift in social and cultural values across generations?
         
        Kahan Ka Raasta is an immersive journey, in time and space, into the everyday reality of Kalap. It transpires at the pace of the village life, to unveil it’s many facets."
        
        
        2017, India/Shooting locations: India/Original language: Hindi and Pahadi
        Speaker: Savyasachi Anju Prabir (Tata Institute of Social Sciences)
      • 18:48 This is My Face/Original title: Esta es Mi Cara 58'
        In Chile, people living with HIV fear stigma, and often conceal their condition and remain silent about what they are going through. 'This is My Face' explores what happens when a range of men living with the virus open up about the illness that changed their life trajectories. It follows a creative process whereby they produce photographic portraits that represent their (often painful) memories and feelings, a process which helps them challenge years of silence, shame, and misrepresentation.
        A lesson in the power of collaborative storytelling.
        
        Chile/UK. 2018/Shooting locations: Chile/Original language: Spanish
        Speaker: Angélica Cabezas Pino (The University of Manchester)
      • 19:46 The Idyll/Original title: 牧歌 20'
        Wang Guanjun is a shepherd living in a small village in Shanxi province, China. He is also a famous
         
        Qinyuan Yangko singer and songwriter in his village. Every day Wang wakes up near his fold and
         
        then spends his whole day herding his goats deep in the mountains. The time of herding goats is
         
        so dull and lonesome that Wang always sings some Qinyuan Yangko songs or write some songs in
         
        the mountains. With the developing of China, more and more traditional villages are disappearing,
         
        so is Wang's village. Now few people lives in the village and it looks desolate. However, Wang still
         
        holds fast to his traditional lifestyle as if nothing had changed. He might be the last sheperd as
         
        well as the last Qinyuan Yangko songwriter of his village. This film documents Wang's unique life
         
        and implies some profound considerations of Chinese modern lifestyle.
        
        
        2018, China/Shooting locations: Shanxi province, China/Original language: Mandarin
        Speaker: Yiyang Huang (School of Journalism and Communication,Tsinghua University)
      • 20:06 Break 15'
      • 20:21 Horror in the Andes 40'
        Horror in the Andes tells the story of a friendship that is held together by a shared passion for filmmaking. Set in the small town of Ayacucho the documentary follows three friends during their adventures while making a horror movie. It explores how indigenous filmmakers have resorted to horror fiction as a means to render the legacy of colonialism with local audiences whilst articulating notions of Andean identity and the desire to be agents of their own futures.
        
        2019, Switzerland/US/UK/Shooting locations: Ayacucho, Peru/Original language: Spanish, Quechua
        Speaker: Martha-Cecilia Dietrich (University of Bern)
      • 21:01 The Mass/Original title: Masa 33'
        The Mass is a distillation of human evolution, a parable about the treatment of substance, an image of the control over bodies that are hanged on the world’s tissue, or else disgorged from the ocean mass onto dry land, which is interwoven with bodies and the movement of hunters, gatherers, and vagabonds. Our observation of the various forms of abstracted masses, which we become part of at the same time, creates a platform of eternal presence – an active void if you will, which revolves in a closed circle, as though it had neither beginning nor end. What is left is just the stark presence of the traces of bared lives.
        
        2017, Czech Republic/Shooting locations: Izmir (Turkey), Lesbos (Greece)/Original language: English, Greek, Arabic
        Speakers: Ivo Bystřičan (Czech Television), Michal Pavlásek (The Institute of Ethnology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i.)
      • 21:34 Road to Zuni 41'
        Road to Zuni documents the land loss of Zuni Indians and how they won a lawsuit they had filed against the federal government through the expert testimony given by their Anthropologist Dr.Triloki Nath Pandey. With no expectation of reward, A Zuni family helps a struggling student
         
        from India. When the Zuni Tribe fights in court to reclaim their ancestral lands unjustly taken by the U.S., that student ’s expert testimony wins them a $25,000,000 settlement. This becomes the basis
         
        for a subsequent additional award of $25,000,000 for a trust conservancy, and an easement to the land the Zuni consider their heaven.
         
        Professor Triloki Nath Pandey’s story began in India, where coming out of a small village, he carried nothing but his father’s words: “No matter how successful you become, remember where you came from.
        
        
        2017, USA/Shooting locations: USA, India/Original language: English
        Speaker: Annapurna Pandey (University of California, Santa Cruz)
  • Thursday, 29 August 2019
    • 09:00 - 10:30 Plenary Session 2: 29 Aug
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71; 1.43; 1.44
      • 09:00 Plenary Session 2 (Transhumanism’s Solidarity) 1h30'
        Anthropology studies human solidarities that exist and emerge across context and scale--solidarities that, in our times, must be consciously stretched out to other species and ecosystems. Notions of compassion, commonality and solidarity are particularly important in the context of climate crisis and social inequalities.  Recent waves of exclusionist ideologies, xenophobia, and intergroup enmities cannot be simply seen in culturalist terms, but as intertwined with and informing socio-natural relations. By broadening the notion of the collective by linking inequalities and ecology, Anthropologists will help to raise consciousness, define the problems and the emerging new meaning of a collective good, resilience, wellbeing, care, and exchange. By bringing the issue to the table and by the active engagement we will fulfill the political task of promoting solidarities against hostilities and mobilizing social actors in an effort to make our world a better place to live for all beings and forms of life.
        Speakers: Prof. Anita Sujoldzic (Institute for Anthropological Research) (Institute for Anthropological Research), Dr. Fadwa El Guindi (El Nil Research) (El Nil Research), Dr. Heather O'Leary - Convenor (University of South Florida) (University of South Florida), Dr. Agata Konczal - Convenor (European Forest Institute) (European Forest Institute), Dr. Jean CHAMEL (IHAR, Université de Lausanne)
    • 10:30 - 11:00 Coffee break
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Lost in translation? Multifaceted solidarities in activist, research and humanitarian context: P 30.1

      Room 2.103

      In the modern world, there are still places and topics `attractive` as research sites and humanitarian `training ground` for specific social actors with their projects and interests:researchers, activists, representatives of the third sector (NGOs) or journalists. All these interests and projects are often perceived as a one-way relationship, in which specific `voiceless they` from the periphery and `fragile` societies, need to be helped. The panel aim is to shed light on practices that create possible solidarities through those encounters, which engage reciprocal communication and cooperation. Is the outcome of these practices solidarities as ephemeral acts or long-term utilitarian processes? Solidarities seem to be based on universal and objective principles, but often their understandings depend on a constellation of relationships between particular interests, subjective perceptions or implementations someone`s goals. We want to examine what meanings solidarities have and how they work in various fields and contexts (media, science, the civil sector, the state, everyday life). The confrontation of all faces of solidarity through different actions/cases can bring answers to how solidarities become viable and effective, not just empty terms. The various social actors imagine some form of solidarities, but are not these ideas often `lost in translation`? We invite all papers drawing on ethnographic research that will adress the topics as follows: meanings of solidarities in the context of academics` careers, activism, and humanitarianism; reciprocity of giving and assistance (subject/object); tactics applying solidarities (media, researchers, activists, volunteers) / solidarity insiders; centres of power, responsibility, and interest.
      Conveners: Dr. Miroslava Lukic Krstanovic (Institute of Ethnography SASA / Senior Research Associate), Dr. Magdalena Sztandara (nstitute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology Jagiellonian University in Cracow)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.103
      • 11:00 Methodological considerations on researching solidarity 20'
        I will discuss certain methodological issues raised in the study of groups which engage in the promotion of migrant's self-organisation and for whom solidarity is a key principle of their approach.
          ​Doing research with social movements involves working closely with activists, following their categories of knowledge, and remaining open to being guided throught the re-definition of the world they offer. Self-reflection, sensibility, emotional affection function as valuable qualities for understanding the meanings that movements ascribe to their actions. But are these qualities enough?
          ​Doing research under the label of 'solidarity' has certain political and moral implications for all parties involved, namely activists, migrants and researchers. In which ways do our interlocutors discuss 'solidarity' and how is this reflected in their practices? What are the ethical dilemmas one faces when the researched groups are comprised of various sub-groups, each with its own voice? How, in the end, is the story to be told?
          ​I will tackle these issues by referring to my own field of research in Greece. I will discuss various methodological concerns that emerge when examining different voices within groups which at times compete over certain ideas of solidarity and solidarity driven practices. Engaging in activists' political and moral demand for 'change' invites researchers to simultaneously remain aware of their own standpoints, while also taking into consideration the specific context within which they are researching. In this sense, anthropology can offer a prosperous ground for the co-production of knowledge (Casas-Cortes et al. 2008, Hirai 2015) and for critical learning.
        Speaker: Maria Giannoula (European University Viadrina)
      • 11:20 Ethnography and Research-Creation: Cross-Disciplinary Pollination 20'
        The aim of this presentation is to explore and strengthen the linkages between collaborative research-creation methods and “imaginative ethnography” (Elliott and Culhane 2017), as these are practised within performance studies and anthropology. Research-creation uses performance and its creation as collaborative, participatory, embodied, and improvisational approaches to knowing (Arlander et al. 2017; Riley and Hunter 2009). Imaginative ethnography draws upon ethnography, anthropology, and the arts to facilitate creative and embodied constructions of ethnographic knowledge and its representation. In recent years, imaginative ethnography has grown in popularity within performance studies (Kazubowski-Houston and Magnat 2018), while research-creation has gained cachet within anthropology and its cognate fields. Cross-disciplinary borrowings and refashionings have produced significant synergy between these methodological approaches. We still are in need, however, of an inter/transdisciplinary dialogue on the epistemological, methodological, and theoretical implications of this cross-pollination between ethnography and research-creation, both for performance studies and anthropology. This presentation initiates a dialogue about how ethnographic research-creation, as an emerging field of critical and creative inquiry, can facilitate spaces for collaborative, participatory, and imaginative ethnographic “circles of conversation” among researchers, participants, and audience members. Engaging with multidisciplinary research modalities—performance, photography, using video and audiotaping in interviews, sensory ethnography, and participant observation—the presenters will consider how an improvisatory politics of resistance may be anchored in spaces where performance and ethnography collide (Denzin 2003). This presentation will involve a ten-minute discussion followed by a five-minute audio-visual presentation.
        Speaker: Dr. Rajat Nayyar (York University)
      • 11:40 Solidarities based on uncertain membership: Voluntary activists and the politically unconcerned in the Slovak-Hungarian heterogeneous area 20'
        In general, ethnic solidarity tends to be strong among minorities as they can easily identify their common interests. The Hungarian minority has been one of the influential actors in Slovak society since 1989. They have established political parties to present their opinions in the national politics as well as voluntary associations and NGOs to act in civil society. These activities have involved minority experts and have taken a certain role to improve minority’s condition in Slovakia. Compared to other Slovak cities inhabited only by Slovaks, the Hungarian minority seems to be engaged in voluntary works more effectively by using their networks. However, such solidarity sustained by ethnicity is not as strong as expected in certain ethnically heterogeneous areas. According to my research experience, inhabitants tend to hide their ethnic ties; instead, they emphasize inter-ethnic friendship at the community level. Moreover, some of them declare their unconcern with national politics and civic activities relating to ethnicity because of the risk of dividing their heterogeneous community. Thus, the inhabitants also live different kinds of solidarities apart from the “authorized” solidarity of ethnic minority.
          
          In this study, I investigate the meaning of solidary for those who have to associate with different kinds of solidarities to live in a heterogeneous area. The current European national minorities understand their rights; however, there are still struggles to create new solidarity behind authorized solidarities. Anthropologists have an opportunity to rethink the meaning of solidarity based on the reality of the filed.
        Speaker: Dr. Yuko Kambara-Yamane (University of Kitakyushu)
      • 12:00 Solidarity through intermittent interactions between Japanese development practitioners and Indonesian counterparts 20'
        International development cooperation contributes to the creation of rich interaction among stakeholders throughout the world. The relationships between international development practitioners and local counterparts are often described as opposite ends of the spectrum of development cooperation between support providers and recipients, and seemingly end after the completion of projects. In some cases, however, their relationships change and shift to various forms in accordance with the progress of their projects and their career trajectory afterwards.
          
          This paper, based upon qualitative research, examines the case of Japanese development practitioners and Indonesian local counterparts in Sulawesi, Indonesia. The development practitioners were dispatched for the implementation of their assigned projects every two or three years with some interruption. They transferred professional and personal knowledge and skills to local counterparts for the development of the area from the late 1990s until recently. While working side by side, the transferred knowledge and skills were modified by adjusting to local contexts, the process of which was supported by the negotiation of the two entities. Such close interaction fostered their mutual trust, which became a support for their relationship during and after the projects. Currently, their relationships are altering through intermittent interaction brought about by the development and/or changes of their careers. This paper explores the ways in which they shifted their seemingly fixed provider-recipient relationships to equal ones. It concludes by discussing that their intermittent, but long, interaction has supported modest solidarity among them and partly their societies as wholes.
        Speaker: Dr. Yukimi Shimoda (Waseda University)
      • 12:20 Humanitarian actions and solidarities in the media discourse 20'
        The codification of humanitarian actions and solidarities belongs to the broader area of social politics, state policy and the civil sector. While humanitarian aid is more focused on concrete situations, solidarity is based on universal principles, often with fluid meanings and perceptions. On the one hand, social politics in a period of transition has a problem with networking to stay in the positions of centralisation and bureaucratisation, on the other hand there is the civil initiative and social solidarity of the non-government sector which is not sufficiently transparent and supported, especially when the vulnerability is outside national and ethnic boundaries. The main analytical vein is focused on deciphering the ambivalent face of humanitarian practices, which stem from concrete social, economic and political circumstances in Serbia. One of the social playgrounds of humanitarian solidarities is the media, which is an essential transmitter of the message and shapes public opinion in the zones of perception and value systems. The analysis is based on a fundamental question – how are personal stories of poverty and illness constructed into humanitarian stories as social problems? The analysis of newspaper articles shaped into narrative mechanisms in order to construct “subsequent” realities with which people identify.
        Speaker: Dr. Miroslava Lukic Krstanovic (Institute of Ethnography SASA)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 States of Exception: Policy and Politics in Exceptional Times: P 46.1

      Room 3.20

      In recent decades, particularly since 9/11, anthropologists, social scientists, and legal studies scholars have become increasingly interested in the theme of governing in and through emergencies, often drawing on Georgio Agamben’s (2005) and Carl Schmitt’s notion of ‘state of exception’. What these studies share is a concern with scrutinizing sovereign power by investigating state interventions into the rule of law, restrictions on jurisdiction, suspension of human and citizenship rights, militarization, surveillance, and constitutional dictatorships emerging from declarations of state of exception. In addition to formal declarations of exception, however, neoliberal policy agendas, the crisis of democracy, and the proliferation of declarations of urgency and emergency suggest that in many places the ‘state of emergency’ has become the new normal. Whether it be environmental catastrophes, wars, economic crises, or political unrest, governments, public-sector institutions, private bodies and not-for-profit organizations all utilize crises and emergencies to justify making ‘exceptional’ interventions into the domains of policy and law. In some contexts, ruling by decrees has become a governing practice that has blurred the relationship between policy-making, laws, and the concept of due process. We invite contributions that unravel the way interventions under states of emergency provide opportunities for the accumulation of wealth and power, or dispossession, marginalization and exclusion. - What are the characteristics of governing in and through emergencies? - Whose interests do emergencies serve? - What new kinds of subjects and relation do states of exception create? - How do people engage with, or respond to, such states of emergency?
      Conveners: Dr. Cris Shore (Goldsmiths University of London), Mr. Cansu Civelek (University of Vienna)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.20
      • 11:00 State of Exception and Bio Politics: an Analysis of the Views of Agamben, Kafka and Kelsen. 20'
        The notion of State of Exception has made its comeback in the 21st century in the wake of events of 9/11 . Agamben argues that Schmitt’s dangerous defense of Nazi regime in Political Theology has returned in 21st century and surprisingly the carrier is the liberal democratic state. This marks the return of the State of exception . The paper is an attempt to analyze the concept of Bio Politics and its relation with State of Exception with special reference to the philosophy of Giorgio Agamben . Further , the paper tends to explore the issue of bio politics in the work of Franz Kafka, especially in his classical magnum opus The Trial and In The Penal Colony . In addition , an attempt will be made to trace the roots of State of Exception in the works of Carl Schmitt and interpret the work of Hans Kelsen whose anti ideological approach to law is one of the best defenses against the dangerous political ideas of Schmitt.
          . Section I of the paper will discuss the concept of State of Exception as interpreted by Agamben along with the concept of Bio Politics . Section II of the paper will trace the idea of bio politics in the work of Franz Kafka . Section III will give an idea of Kelsen’s reply to State of Exception . Section IV will give the concluding remarks.
        Speaker: Dr. Bhanu Pratap (UNIVERSITY OF LUCKNOW)
      • 11:20 The ‘Nomad Emergency’: Autopsy of a Living Spectre 20'
        The first decree of the Berlusconi government elected in 2008 declared the ‘Nomad Emergency’: a state of exception spurred by social alarm around the permanent but informal settlement of migrant Roma, mistakenly called ‘nomads’ in Italy, around the largest urban centres. Within the ‘Nomad Emergency’, many antigypsyist measures were implemented by local decrees in the name of urban security: begging was outlawed in many places, Roma were denied entry onto the territory of some municipalities, and, in Rome, a special police unit was set up in 2010, with the aim of policing the ‘nomads’. Entangled with processes of gentrification, political and economic interests, the governance of the Roma through emergency has furthered their marginalization and exclusion. Although the ‘Nomad Emergency’ was declared unconstitutional in 2011, some of the measures undertaken within its framework are still operating today. In its effects, the ‘Nomad Emergency’ is alive and well: the police unit, on whose practices I will focus in my paper, is still largely devoted to racial policing.
          However, ruling the Roma – or, in fact, many other political issues in Italy – through emergency did not start in 2008. The aim of my paper is to explore the cultural proclivities towards ruling through exception in Italy which make emergencies a spectral apparition in Italian politics. Focusing on the particular place that Roma-related politics and policies take within emergency governance at the nexus between policies and popular representations of the Roma, I call for attention towards vernacular understandings of ruling through emergency.
        Speaker: Dr. Ana Ivasiuc (Justus Liebig University)
      • 11:40 'Crisis' Industry: Consulting Services and Co-Constituting of Security Practices 20'
        Rita Abrahamsen and Anna Leander (2016) underline: ‘security as a risk management is no longer simply about national interest or about questions of justice or social and political reform but about technocratic solutions’ (ibid.: 3). The state is no longer expected to be the only provider of security or the main actor responsible for protecting individuals. As a consequence, the notion that security is a public good is progressively being abandoned. Processes of privatisation and commodification of policing and security shift power dynamics and focus on heterogeneous risk management tools and its implementation in everyday practices. Using data from ethnographic research conducted in Poland amongst organisers and instructors of risk management workshops and it's participants I explore how expert knowledge of ‘how to be safe’ and to predict and identify potential structural vulnerabilities are being incorporated into daily life and what role temporality and uncertainty play in those processes.
          
          In my anthropological investigation, I argue that the instructors of risk management workshops not only make participants more aware of what might happen but above all shape their everyday practices and re-defined notion of security.
        Speaker: Kamila Grześkowiak (Adam Mickiewicz University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Dark Ethnography, Rejected Peoples and Unwanted Migrants: Are subversive solidarities and migrants a threat to Nation States?: RT 3
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.43
      • 11:00 Dark Ethnography, Rejected Peoples and Unwanted Migrants: Are subversive solidarities and migrants a threat to Nation States? 1h45'
        "The recently surging inwards gaze depicted by the state with an accompanying rise of populism, far right and neo- fascist movements in Europe and America have signified a tightening regime of controls over migrants to these nations. Concomitantly has arisen an interest within anthropology to dwell on the implications of these phenomena all over the world. As the world witnesses 'unwanted migrants' and ‘rejected peoples’ (Weiner 1993) shuffle between ‘states’- literally and figuratively in more ways than one, the common ethnographic connections between secure and non-secure migrations are hard to be missed. A parallel rise of crimes related to substance abuse, trafficking, environmental offenses, terrorism and militancy raise two points of focus for researchers a) the harsh brutal dimensions of human existence that actors as migrants and rejected peoples face or build upfront into and, b) Emergence of deeply ethnographic and humanitarian solidarities between migrants and host societies over and above subversive socio-political scenarios and choices. How do social scientists and experts relate to this rapidly changing context of migration and challenges of working with two different sets of people: a) victims, negatively impacted groups, resistors to restrictive worlds of crime and, b) perpetrators categorized as, ‘criminals’, traffickers, ‘militant extremists’ or ‘terrorists’ who are ‘not necessarily liked’ by social scientists (Bangstad 2017). What challenges are faced when dark anthropology (Ortner 2016) is undertaken to study non-secure contexts of migration and how different are these from the everyday
         
        ethnography of actors in a secure environment of migration?"
        Speakers: Dr. Bobby Luthra Sinha - Convenor (Sahapedia-UNESCO Fellow and Researcher), Dr. Nirmala Devi Gopal - Convenor (Criminologist, University of Kwa Zulu Natal), Prof. Anapurna Devi Pandey (Cultural Anthropologist, University of California, USA), Prof. Susan Julia Chand (Professor of Anthropology and Director for Research & Innovation at the University of the Southern Caribbean (USC)), Mr. Binny Yadav (Institute Of Media Studies and Information Technology, YMCA), Mrs. Jenelle Abraham (University of KwaZulu Natal)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Ethnography as Emergence: W 2.1
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.3
      • 11:00 Ethnography as Emergence (Part 1) 1h45'
        "Ethnography as Emergence" workshop will use performative strategies and sensory engagement with material objects in a collaborative mode to invite reflection on how ethnography is not the same as field work and how the constitution of what may be considered an ethnographic object remains forever in constitution. If ethnography is a a mode of graphising the field (the ethnos) then one can argue howethnography constructs or carves out one particular object from a field of possibilities. The eventual object that gets carved or made through the doing of ethnography never achieves a fixed and determinate coherence in the shape that it eventually assumes. All ethnographies remain at the realm of being made, amenable to our grasp, and the only way for us to think about this process would be to understand the logic and rationale of its making. This workshop will demonstrate how ethnography is a essentially a logic of making by working with the idea of carving stories in between what one hears and what one writes about what one hears. We will do this through the performative mode. The material sensorium of locating a listenership also weaves itself centrally in to the narrative that gets carved as ethnography. We will demonstrate this logic by showing how any material is always in a transformative relationship with its own materiality. By fusing these two strains together, the workshop will argue and demonstrate how ethnography therefore as an object always exists in a strain of its own emergence.

        Number of participants: 12
        Duration of the workshop: 210 min
        Pre-registration is required: Yes (Via the registration system)
        Contact to organiser: subhashim.goswami@snu.edu.in, rnr069@mail.harvard.edu
        Speakers: Subhashim Goswami (Shiv Nadar University), Radhika Rao (University of San Francisco)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Occupational Health Hazards and Public Health: An Anthropological Insight: P 35.1

      Room 3.130

      Occupational health has gradually developed from a mono-disciplinary, risk- oriented activity to a multi-disciplinary and comprehensive approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental and social well-being, general health and personal development. The present panel aimed at highlighting the anthropological insight on the occupational health hazards among the working population. Nodoubt Occupational health aimed at the protection and promotion of the health of workers by preventing and controlling occupational diseases and accidents and by eliminating occupational factors and conditions hazardous to health and safety at work but still apart from the social atrocities, these working population are also exposed to many occupational health hazards like exposure to harmful gases, drowning, musculo skeletal disorders, infections, skin problems, respiratory system problem and cardiovascular degeneration. Present panel also discuss about management of toxic environment that came from working area and have direct effect on the health of the workers and also represent the important safety measures and safety guide for workers working in hazardous environment and also tries to explain about Training and prerequisite required.
      Conveners: Dr. AJEET JAISWAL (DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY PUDUCHERRY INDIA), Dr. YENER BEKTAS (Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University), Dr. J.B.Prashant More (Institut des Hautes Etudes Economiques et Commerciales(Inseec), Paris)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.130
      • 11:00 Climate Change, Occupational and Disease Patterns in Coastal Populations 20'
        Product of Climate change is change in the weather conditions directly or indirectly i.e. change in the atmospheric conditions as well as livelihood and infrastructure. Increased patterns of mortality and morbidity (directly or indirectly) can be observed through Climate-sensitive diseases. India is one of the most vulnerable countries in South Asia which is highly susceptible to climate change. The variation in the climate change along the Indian coast eventually has a remarkable impact on health and socio-economic condition on local communities and their livelihood. In Indian coastal areas main occupation is either the fishing or horticulture. These occupations reveal the higher vulnerability due to variability in the climate change.
          In India, coastal population with reference to occupational health effect due to climate change has not gained the attention of researcher so far. An anthropological attempt tried to illustrate in the present study considering the increasing trend of impact of climate change on health of coastal population. The study unfolds the linkages between climate change, occupation and health in coastal populations. Further, it has been shown in the study that associations of these linkages are complex, multi-layered and predictions of the future health impacts of climate change are still in vague.
        Speaker: Dr. VIJETA CHOUDHAR (DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF DELHI)
      • 11:20 Health Dynamics and Occupational Profile in Western India 20'
        Occupational profile is a prominent social determinant which not only has direct influence on health and well-being but also interacts with other determinants to a produce a vital effect on health of an individual. In context of developing countries such as India, there exists a complex relationship between occupational activity and health status. In western India, people engage in an array of economic pursuits ranging from agriculture, trade and business, fishing (especially in coastal regions) to daily wage activities. In order to sustain life, they pursue economic activities in accordance to their socio-economic and education level, prevalent physical environment and social support network. Caste composition and social stratification also play a critical role in economic pursuit both in industrial and government sector. Owing to lack of proper facilities in working environment, inadequate budget allocations towards occupational health facilities, absence and/or lack of community involvement, corruption among workers, trade unions and government officials, lack of awareness and proper education, the occupational healthcare infrastructure is crumbling in India. Further occupational hazards, unemployment and lower wages have significantly affected the mental, physical and social well being of workers. Hence the present study has made an attempt to address and unravel the relationship between occupational structure and the health status of people living in western India from socio-cultural perspective. In addition certain suggestions and strategies have proposed to strengthen the occupational healthcare infrastructure in India.
        Speaker: VIJIT DEEPANI (DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF DELHI, DELHI-110007, INDIA)
      • 11:40 The study of an impact of the occupational health hazards among the Onges and Jarawas like indigenous communities of Andaman nicobar island and their world solidarities 20'
        The impact of occupational health and individual physical, mental and social well being status among indigenous sportive foraging communities the Onge of little Andaman and the Jarawas better explains the solidarity and hostility of these ethnic groups with outside world. The acculturation of these indigenous communities by a socio-cultural interaction with outside world resulted into the extinction of onge population and also the hostility of theJarawas with world solidarities. These hunter gathering working population having exogamous clan system which is underpinning with their local eco system and public health system but it is by the intrusion outside culture which may not suitable to thier lifestyle and culture. The changing food pattern (kachcha food to Pucca food)due to outsiders to this people persuade to the decreasing sportive health quality to catch the wild boar which is their main stay of life almost the theme of this onge population itself. The culture and social inequalities existing with outside world solidarities creates these egalitarian communities into extincting ethnic population groups itself. Because the poaching by outsiders shrinking of land rights resulted into the decrease in the yield of wild boar and other food collections such as fishing activity.
        Speaker: K Veeramani (University of Madras)
      • 12:00 ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW ON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH FUNCTION AND FEMALE TEXTILE WORKER OF INDIA 20'
        India has been manufacturing hub for the textile industry since time of the harappa civilization. It has been playing a great role in terms of employment generation and sharing of GDP to economy after agricultural sector in contemporary india,nonetheless we can't shut on's eyes that the occupational hazardous effect it creates to the life of textile worker in general and female worker in particular. Reduction of respiratory function among textile workers in textile industry has been observed since 1970s. An contaminant of raw cotton fibre and cotton dust , has been proposed as an affecting agent that may deteriorate the respiratory function. An anthropological review has been attempted to find factors associated with the deterioration of respiratory functon among female textile workers. Th sample consisted of 243 men above age of 20 years who had worked for atlast 3 month years in textile factory and 235 female non textile workers of ame area studies. This epidemiological study were studied by pretested qusstionnaire to respondents regarding to gather information regarding chest symptops certain personal chracteristics and personal history.Univariate analysis of the factors for respiratory problem showed that dusty worksites, heavy smoking and duration of service years were significant. Logistic regression analysis showed that working in the scouring,spinning,and weaving sections,heavy smoking and more than 10 years of service were independant signifacnt factors. Efforts to reduce dust levels in the working environment and to discourage smoking among textile workers need to be strengthened to minimize the risk of developing byssinosis.
        Speaker: KAMALAKANTA GAHAN (PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Audiovisual Session: AV 3

      Room 2.122

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.122
      • 11:00 I Have a Song to Sing You/Original title: Imam pesmu da vam pevam 6'
        This experimental short documentary seeks out Ivanka, a woman who lives in rural Eastern Serbia and who spent most of her life falling into trance to enter the realm of the dead and learn about the future. Ethnographic archive materials from her days as a prophet are interwoven with contemporary footage shot now that the supernatural forces have left her. As such, the film plays on dualities of time and ontology to explore how this experience has affected her relationship to the landscape that surrounds her, while engaging in a meta discourse on the digital nature of film and visualisation of memory.

        Serbia 2018/Shooting locations: Serbia/Original language: Serbian/Vlach
        Speakers: Eluned Zoe Aiano (Freelance), Alesandra Tatić (University of Aix-Marseille)
      • 11:06 Absent Wound/Original title: زخم 10'
        "The rituals of the ancient Persian warrior training, is seen in combination with the recitations of a young girl coming to terms with her impending womanhood. [ The film is shot and performed by the director, a woman, in two locations in Iran where women’s presence is prohibited: the 'House of Strength' and a public men’s bath. ]"

        Iran - UK 2017/Shooting locations: Iran/Original language: Farsi
        Speaker: Maryam Tafakory (Oxford University)
      • 11:16 Living Migration/Original title: 移住を生活する 12'
        This film is a collaboration between filmmaker/anthropologist Can Tamura (John Wells) and artist Murakami Satoshi in relation to Murakami's work "Living Migration." Murakami travels on foot carrying a house that he made from styrene foam in Busan, South Korea and later in Kanazawa, Japan. The first part filmed in South Korea focuses primarily on conveying Murakami's sensory experience of moving with and living in his small house through the use of a GoPro camera and microphones mounted inside. The second part filmed in Japan reveals more of both the local context and the context of his project as he unsuccessfully negotiates with the owners of Buddhist temples to allow him to sleep in his house on their land for one night. This film, through collaborative and sensory ethnographic methodologies, contributes to the conversation about the ways in which anthropologists and contemporary artists can share similar methods or concerns. "Living Migration" was added to the collection of the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa in February 2019.

        2018 (Japan)/Shooting locations: Busan, South Korea and Kanazawa, Japan/Original language: Japanese
        Speakers: Can Tamura (University of Münster), Murakami Satoshi (Artist)
      • 11:28 The Camp is Razed to the ground. Felicien films the remains/Original title: Le camp est rasé. Félicien filme les restes 18'
        Blue and pixelated images, trees, the road. It shows poles that held the electrical wires that still exist in some places. It shows the main alley, the only part that is not eaten by the vegetation. This filmed essay is the continuation of a first documentary film I devoted to the Togolese refugee camp of Agamé in 2010, ""The Camp"". In the years that followed I had the opportunity to see some of them again, and to follow the evolution of the camp to learn its destruction. It was filmed by one of the characters in the movie ""The Camp"" called Félicien. It is in Cotonou, that one day he presents to me the images of the destroyed camp which he filmed with his cellular phone. I was in regular contact with him and it is therefore without much surprise that I learn the sad end of the camp of Agamé, he delivered me as other refugees, characters from the movie ""The Camp"", early signs by e-mail or texting.

        2018 Belgium/Shooting locations: Benin/Original language: French
        Speaker: Jean-Frédéric de Hasque (UCLouvain)
      • 11:46 In the Outskirts of Venice II/Original title: Dans les faubourgs de Venise II Alla periferia di Venezia II 20'
        In this 2nd study on Venice, I concentrated on women's lives in Venice and quote the work of poet, humanitarian, and courtesan Veronica Franco. When crossing the Via della Libertà causeway into Venice, especially at night, I am overcome with melancholy as I enter this world built on water that seems to have been there forever and yet on closer inspection shows distinct signs of its future disappearing. There is the ebb and flow of the water, the milky green lagoon and the opaque turquoise canals. A world of mariners, travelling to and from the islands in gondolas, water taxis and vaporetti. In Venice I stick to the outskirts and the islands, I stop here and there in the insulate corners of the city floating landscapes, where the eroding movement of time stopped seems to be eternal. In Cities & Elsewhere, I draw on the traditions of the tableaux vivants of Louis XIV, Delsartean ‘Living pictures’ and the later poses plastiques performance activities. My work as a performance artist in Johannesburg early 1980s informs the live still scenes filmed here, transforming everyday scenes and duration performances, inspired by Philip Glass, the Wooster Group, Elizabeth LeCompte, Spalding Gray, Benjamin Patterson.

        2017, France/Shooting locations: Venice, Italy/Original language: English, Italian
        Speaker: Rina Sherman (K éditeur)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Council of Commissions Training Session on Online Presence: W 3
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.44
      • 11:00 Council of Commissions Training Session on Online Presence 1h45'
        This recommended session will train representatives from each Commission in developing their online presence. Each Commission should send a representative. It is necessary that the representatives bring their own computers. Commissions will leave the session with an up-and-running website and/or social media presence.

        Number of participants: up to 100
        Duration of the workshop: 105 min
        Pre-registration is required: No
        Contact to organiser: olear079@umn.edu
        Speaker: Heather O'Leary (University of South Florida)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development: P 7.3

      Room 2.21

      "Anthropology in Public Sphere: Solidarity, Peace and Development” is based on significant events of present era demonstrate that anthropology has established a new grip in the public sphere—one can make the most of novel forms of communication to reach far beyond the academic activities to distribute knowledge widely and freely. This focuses on different contemporary areas of vigorous anthropological research in future that also addressed some of the natural life most extreme problems and issues. Anthropology believes in a model of development that is more people centric. One that focuses on issues such as environment, poverty, food security, gender, social justice, inclusive growth etc. Such a model, we believe, needs to take culture as an important component of the idea of sustainable development with world solidarity and peace. Anthropology as a discipline enable the cultivation of certain modes of thinking which will prepare individuals and societies to face these three urgent challenges of the twenty first century: solidarity, peace and development. As a discipline, Anthropology can lend a powerful voice to non–hegemonic and marginalized cultural perspectives on Solidarity, Peace and Development, and thereby lead to more fruitful conversations on the topic.
      Conveners: Dr. Iswa Chandra Naik (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha), Dr. Raghuraman Trichur (California State University), Ms. Dwiti Vikramaditya (Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.21
      • 11:00 Anthropology as a counter-culture: from 1960’s until today 20'
        Anthropology perceived as cultural critique has a long tradition. Its critical potential was revealed in, for example, the 1960s: on the one hand, it was an innovative formula of the American Indian Chicago Conference from 1961 developed by Sol Tax, on the other hand, the teach-ins idea “invented” by Marshall Sahlins. In 2016 in Poznań an Extraordinary Congress of Anthropologists was held under the slogan ""Against Discrimination,"" whose goals can also be described as counter-cultural.
          In the presentation, I would like to present these three events in the context of the question about the place of anthropology in public space. I am interested in a specific strategy of action, going beyond academic standards and its implementation. The key question concerns the effectiveness of anthropology as a counter-culture and as a medium of action for social solidarity.
        Speaker: Prof. Waldemar Kuligowski (Departmeent of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University)
      • 11:20 "SOLIDARITY AMONG THE DIFFERENT RELIGIOUS GROUPS, CO-EXISTENCE AND PEACEFUL WORLD" 20'
        History indicates that more people have been killed in religious disputes than in political wars. The less knowledge of different religions, misunderstanding of religious truth and lack of religious co-ordination are the causes of such disputes . So by enlightening people about the fact that the main goal of all religions are the same i.e. to realize the self-soul, God and attain Salvation for He is omnipotent and omnipresent and can not be divided into different sacred centers like mosques, temples or churches. God has no certain name, shape or colour. 
          
          Secondly, the religious beliefs, sacred centers, sacred rituals, sacred specialists etc are merely the worldly things therefore these are changeable and mortal civilization, which have lost their existence and importance. So keeping this in mind we should not quarrel for these worldly things.
          
          
          It can be avoided by teachings or preaching of religious truth and for this teachings of major religions should be started in schools colleges and university. It will give people better understanding of different religions. On other hand social organization may be formed on village, block, district, and state, national and international levels. The propagation of such ideas and message by public, private agencies, religious authorities and media may altogether slowly develop the socio-religious harmony, peace and solidarity among the different religious groups.
        Speaker: Dr. PARAS KUMAR CHOUDHARY (RANCHI UNIVERSITY, RANCHI,JHARKHAND)
      • 11:40 Brazilian anthropology as political voice for rights and solidarity 20'
        Brazilian Anthropology is characterized by the priority study of political minorities in the Brazilian territorial context. The constitution of the Brazilian Association of Anthropology (ABA) in 1955, made a strong commitment to the constitution of a political voice in the public sphere in favor of the rights of minorities. 
          The Brazilian Constitution promulgated on October 5, 1988 established the rights to cultural diversity and citizens' rights. In this broad period, social identity movements have grown in the name of cultural diversity: indigenous and traditional peoples, rights to environmental sustainability, and coping against racism and sexism.
          The anthropologists from their knowledge became important voices making known through their studies and ethnographies the rights to diversity. They published notes, articles in newspapers, interviews in the media and in social networks, far beyond academic speech. They began to dedicate themselves, in the public sphere, to the promotion and defense of the conquered rights.
          In recent years, the political landscape in favor of fundamental rights has receded. The participation of the ABA and the anthropologists in the name of the defense of fundamental rights, based on their anthropological studies, has become more and more pressing.
        Speaker: Dr. Lia Zanotta Machado (University of Brasilia/Department of Anthropology)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Connecting people through sports (Commission on the Anthropology of Sports): P 15.3

      Room 1.71

      Sports has been, currently and thorough its history from the 19th century, an arena where people are simultaneously connected and isolated, exercise their solidarity and fighting for their supremacy. Many groups and individuals use sportive practices and events in order to improve their visibility, to claim their identities, and to share experiences through the world. Not only a place of confrontations, sports also connect people from different backgrounds and create new networks. In an environment of competitions and rivalry, sport practitioners sharing some goals, constraints, and sense of solidarity (between teammates, for example) can become a community of practice, in a short or long term. How do people and groups build their identities and networks through sportive events and practices? How dimensions of competitions and solidarities in sports are articulated by individuals and groups, spectators and practitioners, to create new kinds of communities? Did an Anthropology of sports can allow a new understanding of the concept of "relationship"? In this panel, our aim is also to create a place where the concepts of "solidarity" and "connection" can be articulated in two different ways among scholars. In the first sense, by connecting researches from different countries and theoretical perspectives, in a possible more collective and comparative studies. In the second sense, focusing primarily on the political dimension of sportive practices, connecting different areas (gender, identities, and others) of interest of the Anthropology of Sports, around a common theme.
      Conveners: Dr. Luiz Rojo (Universidade Federal Fluminense), Dr. Jérôme Soldani (Universite Paul Vallery)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71
      • 11:00 Women's Football in Brazil: Sororities and Resistances 20'
        In Brazilian context football is a sport modality made by men and understood from their perspective. The discourses on the presence of women advance, almost always, in three directions: a) describing them as naturally docile and fragile beings (considered as essentially female aspects), and focused on motherhood; b) questioning women's sexuality under homophobic arguments; c) establishing arbitrary measures that condition and restrict their presence in the sports field.
          Despite the attempts of exclusion, restrictions and obstacles faced by women over the last few years in Brazil, this work and ethnography aims to present how football practiced by women in the outskirts of São Paulo can be a space of autonomy and freedom, favoring the sisterhood and resistance of women.
          We intend to contribute to a feminist perspective showing how these women dribble situations of risk and vulnerability - as drug trafficking, family violence, early pregnancy - creating solidarity bonds between each other and spaces of sorority.
        Speaker: Dr. Mariane Da Silva Pisani (Universidade de São Paulo)
      • 11:20 Meaningful experiences through recreational endurance running and hiking in Belgium 20'
        Recreational running and hiking is not a new phenomenon, but over the past decade it has become an increasingly popular leisure-time activity with people covering longer distances. Running and walking events such as ultra-trails and thru-hikes, but also heritage runs and/or walks are growing in numbers. Not only are trails longer in distance, the way in which people engage with these recreational physical activities has intensified as well. Through framing them as 'serious leisure', endurance running and hiking can be understood as activities that offer meaningful experiences that go beyond the mere physical movement. Besides investigating the involvement and investment of practitioners, the research presented here also wants to comprehend the overall context in which these endurance activities take place. In trying to do so, I focus on the role of the broader community that surrounds them. That is, the offline and online communities of recreational endurance runners and hikers, as well as the role of event organisers, volunteers, and family members and friends. How do the experiences and understandings of the broader community of these serious leisure pursuits influence the ways in which practitioners deal with their embodied selves? In this paper, I will present preliminary data and anthropological insights from a literature study and ethnographic fieldwork with both endurance runners and hikers, conducted before, during, and after endurance events. Besides participant observation, the ethnography also includes digital methods to examine the online communities that have developed around these endurance activities.
        Speaker: Eilis Lanclus (KU Leuven)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Women in the History of Anthropology [Commission on Global Feminisms and Queer Politics]: P 43.1

      Room 3.44

      Anthropology suffered in the 1960s an important shift. The approaches that were positioned as neutral or distant from the object studied, as well as those colonialist positions, came to live with engaged perspectives in which there was adhesion of the researcher with the struggles for justice and social transformation involving the movements studied. This turnaround was made possible, to a great extent, by the contribution of women to the discipline that, by theorizing subjectivity, agency and power constructed the conditions of this displacement. Women are present throughout the history of anthropology, despite the more widespread versions that make them invisible and that assume their contributions as less relevant. Nowadays, in spite of the various initiatives of Feminist Anthropology in refocusing anthropological thinking from the lens of gender and sexuality, the discipline still shapes itself as an androcentric dimension of reality. The anthropological canon recognizes few women and undergraduate and postgraduate courses have a predominantly male bibliography. Currently, in world anthropologies, women are the majority in associations. Even so, when speaking of “anthropological theory”, there is not enough recognition of the production of women. The open panel will allow the construction of a reflection on the impacts of feminism on the history of anthropology, as well as the recognition and appreciation of the contributions of women, indigenous, queer, trans, black and other subalternized groups. We desire to impact on the field's theoretical framework, expanding the participation of more symmetrical and decolonial reflections in the world anthropological canon.
      Conveners: Dr. Felipe Bruno Martins Fernandes (Federal University of Bahia), Dr. Susana Rostagnol (Universidad de la República), Dr. Miriam Pillar Grossi (Federal University of Santa Catarina)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.44
      • 11:00 Works and wives: politics of intimate coolaboration in the history of french anthropology 20'
        This paper will discuss the possibilities and consequences of including intimate partnerships in our reflections on the history of anthropology. “The wife of the anthropologist” is a common figure in footnotes, book acknowledgements and obituaries of ethnographers. Mentions of these women, however, vanishes when it comes to ethnographical descriptions, (auto) biographies, ethnographers archives and the history of our discipline. Drawing from my doctoral research, which focuses on the works and lives of 14 couples of ethnographers that have gathered collections for the Musée de l’Homme (France) in the 1930’s, I will show how traditional gender expectations shape the conditions of participation and remembrance for many of the women anthropologists of the XXth century. The at the time newborn “science of men” may be depicted as particularly welcoming to women, as it invited young, educated daughters of the european bourgeoisie to take part on colonial ethnographical expeditions. They were seen as valuable field workers that could grasp the “female side” of native cultures. None the less, such “gendered inclusion” also offered male anthropologist a precious source of unpaid work, involving activities such as field work, translation, text revision, bibliographical research, housework, care work and memorial work. Hence, these women provided the invisible conditions for the production of canonical authors, exemplar careers and for anthropology as an institutional science. Acknowledging their existence and describing their contribution is a way to make the collaborative nature of intellectual work visible, and also to question our concepts of authorship, science, and recognition.
        Speaker: Fernanda Azeredo de Moraes (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (LAHIC/IIAC))
      • 11:20 Women in South American anthropology 20'
        One of the greatest challenges that as feminist anthropologists we have to carry on is to make visible our genealogy. Most women are quite invisible in the official history of anthropology. Therefore, after thoroughly looking for women in the development of South American anthropology, I have started the work in a puzzle to bring them into the big picture. The paper is organized into four parts. The first one is an overlook of Latin American anthropology in order to give a context. The second one examines women involvement in anthropology, it makes a reference to the place the academia gave them, also taking into account those who worked mostly for their anthropologist husbands. I tried to elaborate women anthropologists lineages. The third part is devoted to intellectual biographies of remarkable women in the South American anthropology history. To better understand their influence I divided them into two groups: one with anthropologists from Europe or the United States who stayed long periods of time in South America establishing a close relationship with the people they have worked with. I have chosen to work on Olivia Harris and June Nash biographies. The other group is made up of South American women anthropologists, here I have chosen to work on Esther Hermitte and Alicia Dussan. Finally, the fourth part brings a discussion on the role of women in the development of anthropology, considering gender relation as well as colonial relations.
        Speaker: Dr. Susana Rostagnol (Universidad de la República)
      • 11:40 Strong authorial 'I' and feminist sensitivity - two Polish women-anthropologists in British and American academia 20'
        I will present my analysis of the biographies and creative production of Maria Czaplicka and Alicja Iwańska to show how these imaginative women from periphery managed to get some space in British and American academia, paying high prize for this. 
          
          Both women deserve attention. Czaplicka for her theorizing about shamanism and gender, her expedition to Siberia in 1914-5, her travelogue, which can be seen as one of first reflexive descriptions of fieldwork, her political engagement in the independence of Poland, and in the international suffrage movement. But there were also dubious issues in her activity: mainly racial discourse (typical of the time).
          
          Alicja Iwańska, trained in philosophy in Poland and in sociology in the U.S., conducted intensive fieldwork in Mexico in 1960s, under the auspices of Sol Tax. She wrote an ethnographic novel about her fieldwork in Polish in 1968 and other literary texts. Her academic works were in English. This language duality stresses stylistic duality of her output.
          
          As it has been typical for a traditional history of anthropology, both women were almost totally forgotten. The format of world anthropology and feminist re-reading of predecessors make it possible to include important contributions of women (from peripheries) into the cannon of the discipline. I am following Sally Cole in her critical feminist history of anthropology, that entails rethinking the theory, unearthing overlooked positions by rereading women’s anthropological writing. I propose a format of an anthropological biography (focus on the production of knowledge, multiple contextualisation, theoretical impact). 
        Speaker: Dr. Grażyna Kubica-Heller (Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University)
      • 12:00 In anthropology there are women (and many!): The female presence at the 18th IUAES World Congress 20'
        We propose the exercise of reflecting on the presence of women in the 18th IUAES World Congress, (61% of the participants and 90% of the organizing committee). We intend, from a feminist point of view, to think about how this participation provided new experiences and other ways of building and experiencing the event. The presentation is structured as a short documentary about the Brazilian experience of organizing the 18th IUAES World Congress at the Federal University of Santa Catarina. We seek to highlight the space of student formation and construction of communitas through the engagement of anthropologists in a joint project to bring global anthropology to Brazil, as well as to extend the reflections on the past, the present and the future of anthropological knowledge.
        Speaker: Suzana Morelo Vergara Martins Costa (Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina)
      • 12:20 Teaching about Women Anthropologists 20'
        In this paper I will focus on the contents of the Feminist Anthropology course that I give with the collaboration of teaching team in the Social Anthropology Undergraduate degree at Buenos Aires University (UBA). It´s surprising the student´s reaction when they discover the existence of women anthropologists. Women, except for Margaret Mead or Ruthe Benedict, that have not been mentioned before. As feminist anthropologists we also try to make visible the relationship between political movement and university. Therefore, we pay special attention to the connection among the first and the second wave and the creation of a feminist anthropology. In the same way, we are convinced that the consolidation of the feminist anthropology has been crucial to rescue the biographies and articles of the forgotten women anthropologists.
          This is not a simple goal. It needs an intense bibliographical research that we keep on going. We must add the problem of the insufficient translation of the English and French literature. Sometimes, we had to solve this inconvenience doing translations to circulate inside the course or writing papers about North American anthropologists before Franz Boas. On the other hand, we face the challenge of the heterogeneity and dispersion of the Latin-American anthropology production. Specially, when we refer to women´s anthropology works.
          Finally, I want to emphasize that teaching about this topic, allows a rich dialogue between old and new generations around feminism, social change and academic policies.
        Speaker: Dr. Mónica Tarducci (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Infrastructure Building, Mobility, and Solidarity: P 48.1

      Room 3.134

      In the past two decades, both cities and rural areas around the world gained new forms of mobility and complexity in shaping human encounters. One perspective in anthropology is to see cities and developing rural areas as sites for the confluence of infrastructures and cultures. Infrastructures here include not only roads, railways, water pipes, or electric grids, but also media, Internet, and languages that allow for the trafficking of people, goods, ideas, beliefs, and lifestyles. To think of infrastructures relationally requires us to look at the ways in which old and new infrastructures are woven into the everyday workings of a locale, and how they inform the distribution of resources, generate political contestation, and articulate the locality with globalizing forces. Then, what kinds of forces are behind the establishment of these old and new infrastructures? How do infrastructures become landscapes, and how do certain aesthetics mediate this process? How do local, translocal and transnational people perceive, use, react or navigate such revamped ways of connectivity? What kinds of politics, imaginaries, memories and belongings are emerging? How will connections among people generate new forms of solidarities, albeit truncated ones? This panel welcomes papers addressing emerging aspects of urban and rural lives across different sites in the global south, and aims to develop understanding of the relations between infrastructure building, mobility, and solidarities.
      Conveners: Prof. Zhou Daming (Center for Migration and Ethnicity), Prof. Tan Chee-Beng (Anthropology Department of Sun Yat-sen University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.134
      • 11:00 Automated vehicle systems and hope for the revitalization of a depopulating area in Japan 20'
        In Japan the population has been notably decreasing since 2008 with resultant social issues. This does not reflect a gradual social change nationwide but rather more rapid and adverse impacts on some rural areas. I conducted anthropological fieldwork in one of these rural areas in Japan, the northern part of Kyoto Prefecture, where a population of over 10,000 in 1960 had halved by 2018. We can see many issues in the area, such as empty houses, damage to crops by wild animals, outflow of young people to the city, limited transport and even disappearance of local communities. These problems are interrelated and they drastically change social conditions.
          In this talk, I will introduce types of transport problems seen in this area and discuss potentially effective countermeasures for the problems. Automated vehicle systems(AVs) are considered to be one of the most promising technologies for tackling transport problems in such areas and residents hope to install them in their communities. The Japanese government has also started to perform social experiments on implementing AVs. However, emerging technologies do not always effectively address life issues and can instead cause undesired side effects. To illustrate this point, I will introduce a project that was conducted in collaboration with the local government and an automotive company to search for a better way of installing AVs. I will consider social acceptance of AVs and discuss both more effective uses of technology and the possibilities of anthropological research to revitalize depopulating regions in Japan.
        Speaker: Dr. Goro Yamazaki (Osaka University)
      • 11:20 Impacts of Roads on the Ethnic Dulong Communities in Southwest China and Their Coping and Adopting Strategies 20' ( Morasko Kampus, room: 3.134 )
        Dulong people are one of the smallest ethnic groups officially recognized as one of the 56 ethnic groups in China. They are well-known in China as the face tattoo people. The history of the Dulong is not well documented, because they have been living isolated in the Dulong Valley which sits in the mountains bordering Tibet and Yunnan, one of the most remote regions of China. With the construction of a 96.2-kilometer long mud road in 1999, the Dulong people ended its history without roads and its isolation with the outside world. Then on April 10, 2014, a tunnel was completed that connects the beautiful valley with the outside world more closely. The construction of this road has huge impacts on the ethnic Dulong community in the valley. The road not just allows for trafficking of people and goods, but also brings in new ideas, beliefs and lifestyles. This paper will discuss the history of the road construction in the Dulong River Valley; road and development; road and mobility and solidarity; road and socio-cultural changes of the Dulong people; and how the Dulong people cope and adopt to these changes.
        Speaker: Dr. Gang Chen (Center for Social and Economic Behavior Studies, Yunnan University of Finance and Economics)
      • 11:40 Metamorphosis of Chengtoushan Village: A Case Study of Transformation of Contemporary Rural China Based on Cultural Heritage 20'
        Chengtoushan Ruins situates in Hunan, China. Having a history of over 6500 years, it is known as the site where the cultivation of rice started, as well as where the first preliminary city in ancient China was founded. Since 2002, the local government have been managing the development of Chengtoushan as a tourist attraction centered on its cultural heritage, including the construction of Chengtoushan Ruins Museum. The transformation of Chengtoushan may serve as a model for the ongoing agrarian transition in rural China and can be categorized as below:
          1) Village transformation. With the flow of investment towards Chengtoushan, the surrounding villages experienced significant changes in their dwelling space. Efforts in improving the infrastructure were showcased in the updated traffic planning and sewage systems in local communities. All of these changes coincided with the call from the central government to implements the guidelines of “Beautiful Village” in Chinese countryside.
          2) Identity transformation. About 2000 Mu(1.33 km²) of farmlands and homesteads in total were appropriated by the government for the construction of the Chengtoushan Ruins Park.The farmers who lost their lands in this process had to relocate to the planned community housing area modeled after urban residence. These former rural residents are becoming urban residents.
          3). Agricultural transformation. Reliance on traditional agriculture is subsided by creative agriculture and branded agriculture titled after Chengtoushan. The emersion of restaurants and rental services also indicates the rise of service industry. These offered the locales new ways of re-employment.
        Speaker: Zhijun Cai (Shenzhen Press Group)
      • 12:00 Chili Fever: The Modernization of Condiments in China's Urbanization 20'
        Almost without exception, China's fast-growing megacities have been hit by the spicy cuisine, and for those cities outside China’s traditional spicy zone, the proliferation of spicy food also represents a major challenge to the traditional local cuisine. The change of food culture is de facto a symbol of the transformation from traditional Chinese regional cities to modern migration cities. In the process of deterritorialization food replacing traditional local food, the decisive historical background is the high integration of modern logistics and increasingly frequent population flow. Formulated condiments and standard food processing symbolized mass production food in megacities, the flavour of chili overwhelmed other flavour, outstand in the formulated modern condiments. Pungency of chili natural with prominent iconic characteristics, easy to form an identification of taste, Spiciness can mask the bad taste and texture of frozen foods brought about by modern logistics, also can make use of the most of ingredients (including foods near their expiration date or even expired ones). Spiciness stimulates saliva production and encourages consumers to eat more food more quickly, making it profitable for restaurants. Chili can also be easily combined with other flavours to create a unique spice formula that can be incorporated into a company's signature recipe.
        Speaker: Dr. Yu Cao (Sun Yat-sen University)
      • 12:20 Cultural Heritage Development and Solidarity in Southwest China 20'
        As a newly emerging China-NIAHS (National Important Agricultural Heritage Systems) in 2017, Shizhu Coptis has increasingly become the topic concerned by researchers and the local government. It has been acknowledged with its unique medical significance, and also its traditional production system is of great value culturally, socially and economically to the solidarity of the county and beyond. This study is the first to provide an anthropological perspective on the China-NIAHS of Coptis traditional production system (CTPS) in Shizhu Tujia County, an ethnic minority autonomous region in Southwest China. Since 2002, when Food and Agricultural Organisation initiated the protection of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems , the value and significance, as well as the urgency, of agricultural heritage systems has been widely emphasized. However, such heritage systems, especially the case in this paper, which is currently the only one agricultural heritage system with great medical values, have not been completely assessed for their contribution to the solidarity and civilization of the society, as each reflects a particular context with complexity. This study, therefore, is sampled purposively to take Shizhu CTPS as a unit of analysis to explore the relationships and features between the agricultural heritage system and its contexts, particularly its relationship and contribution to the solidarity of the ethnic minority county. Four features of Shizhu CTPS with its best “fit” were analyzed. The embedded cultural element and proposed approaches were discussed to illuminate the future research of agricultural heritage system and its contribution to solidarity in China and globally.
        Speaker: Dr. Qian TIAN (Southwest University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Food Solidarity: Moral economies of food production and consumption as a foundation for human and environmental security [Commission on Anthropology and Environment & International Commission on the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition]: P 45.1

      Room 3.45

      Food is emerging as a conflicted field in the wake of an emerging global supply crisis. World hunger has been increasing again in recent years due to climate change impacts and conflict, leading to predictions of mass migration. Different concepts such as ‘food security’, ‘food sovereignty’, ‘the human right to food’, ‘sustainable food production’, ‘sustainable food consumption,’ and ‘the rights of animals’ all are part of a struggle to promote stricter normative standards and to develop policies that meet these standards so as to achieve sustained positive outcomes at a systemic level. This is difficult to reconcile with a contemporary global market economy that shows an increasing regulatory and normative deficit, or with the agricultural and social policies of nation states caught up in outdated, modernist ideas of development and webs of vested interest. Recently, emerging normative concepts also have started to question the right of individuals and communities to eat any kind of food they want. This panel invites contributions illustrating the importance of normative discourses of social and ecological justice and solidarity that are applied in the context of agriculture, food distribution and consumption. Papers on sustainable agricultures and diets, farmers and food movements, or environmental activism around food would be of particular interests, but also studies on global initiatives seeking to produce food solidarity in the face of a looming crisis.
      Conveners: Dr. Thomas Reuter (University of Melbourne), Dr. Frédéric Duhart (Universidad Intercultural del Estado de Puebla), Dr. Xavier Medina (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.45
      • 11:00 BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY IN FOOD PRODUCTION AMONG RURAL FAMILY UNITS IN WEST MEXICO 20'
        The focus of this presentation is the Partida family unit and their sustainable rural food and alcohol production in the southern part of the State of Jalisco, located in West Mexico. For generations this family has been participating in the traditional rural life of the area with their family plots of land dedicated to producing mainly agave and corn. The family consists of Macario and his wife and their 9 children, 6 boys and 3 girls, now adults. The whole family participates in the activities of maintaining a home, agricultural farm, and for 10 years, their own productive Taverna. A comparison is made with other similar family production units in the area. Covered in this study is their direct relationship with the ecosystems and the biodiversity of this zone, and how these families have helped maintain genetic variety among the agave plants indigenous to the area. Covered in detail is the importance of their artisanal production methods and their independence from big industry. This study is the result of direct observation and communication with the Partida family and others of the region.
        Speaker: Dr. Daria Deraga (National Institute of Anthropology and History)
      • 11:20 The diet of Chukchi reindeer herders: energy consumption and transformation of food autonomy regime 20'
        Through the analysis of the archival materials and field data collected in the Iul’tinskii district in Chukotka with a support of the Russian Science Foun­dation (project No. 18-18-00309) the authors tracked the changes in a diet and food practices of Amguema Chukchi reindeer herders at the second part of the XX – beginning of the XXI centuries. During this period, they dramatically changed the ways of food consumption and use of energy resources. The paper aims to analyze the process of how a diet transformation in this part of Chukotka was accompanied by a transition to a new regime of food autonomy. Whereas before the collectivization, which continued in Amguema tundra in the 1950s, households could support a relatively autonomous production and consumption of food resources, today reindeer herders are inevitably dependent on social networks, technical innovations and energy resources to maintain a relatively stable food supply. The emergence of a wide range of food in the stores in the Amguema native settlement and year-round access to fresh venison led to a change of food autonomy. The nutrition of local people became more dependent on relations with and actions of newcomers as well as the use of various vehicles and infrastructure. In this sense, the use of provided by the state and private companies infrastructure by local people allows them to maintain the optimal provision of food resources; yet, it creates the dependence of peoples’ food safety and sustainability on infrastructural objects and vehicles belonging to these organizations.
        Speaker: Dr. Vladimir Davydov (Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera), Russian Academy of Sciences)
      • 11:40 Self-governed community gardens: Experiences of political and social solidarity in Spain 20'
        The recent economic crisis has given way to the emergence of citizen initiatives of solidarity, which have as their main objective to foster mutual-aid relationships among neighbours. These initiatives have played a fundamental role in building food sovereignty at the local level as they provide de-commodified access to food for local participants. Community gardens are a good example of the struggles for emancipation around reproduction as different from the traditional struggles around the world of work (production). These struggles can be considered part of the counter-movements against capitalism that were identified by Polanyi. More concretely they represent what Nancy Fraser has called emancipatory counter movements. 
          
          This text is based on several case studies of community gardens in Spain (Hort Masdeu, in Catalonia, Huerto del Moro, in Seville, Huerto Alisenda in Madrid). We explore how the process of participating in these self-governed initiatives, which are placed in low-rent neighbourhoods, makes possible the development of local links of solidarity, based on mutual-aid and inter-recognition. The assembly as a space of horizontal participation is a fundamental instrument to empower the participants as well as to collectively organise the objective of food sovereignty. 
        Speaker: Dr. M. Antonia Carbonero Gamundí (UIB)
      • 12:00 Building urban community food resilience: Gardening with Incredible Edible Activists in Montreal 20'
        Incredible Edibles (IE) is a social movement that began in Todmorden, England in 2008 and has since spread around the world. Activists involved in the movement reclaim empty public spaces in towns and city neighbourhoods, plant food, and share the harvest with others. The movement’s motto is “If you eat, you’re in!”. This means anyone is welcome to dig up a few carrots, clip some basil, and pick a couple tomatoes, all the while leaving something for the next person and ensuring the plant replenishes. The larger aim of this movement is to build a resilient and more compassionate world through acting at the community level. 
          
          Through ethnographic research for my doctoral thesis, I follow IE activists as they spread soil, plant seedlings, and tend to public gardens in Montreal. Echoing Jahnke (2010), this paper proposes an exploration into what I find unites most IE activists: the pleasure and the joy to work with plants, to touch nature, and to put their hands in the soil. Gardening is a physical as well as a sensual feeling which connects (or perhaps, for some, reconnects) participants with new communities, with their urban surroundings, and with a web of life which contains all living beings. Planting food for others to consume is a symbolic act which raises awareness about personal and collective transitions, allows us to open a discussion about issues of justice, food security and sovereignty, the right to food, and forces us to question our unbalanced power and resource distribution.
        Speaker: Rachel Begg (Concordia University)
      • 12:20 The Land grabs practices and threats to food security and livelihood in India: An anthropological perspective from S.A.S.Nagar, Punjab 20'
        Punjab is known to be highly fertile agricultural land. Punjab is continuously losing its highly fertile agricultural land in the name of development. The Recent trends of developing high-tech cities are some efforts being taken by Punjab government to bring additional investment in the state and boost up its economy. But to do that at the expense of highly fertile agricultural land is a debatable proposition. One of the most recent ventures toward this objective is kind of development being initiated in the vicinity of Chandigarh and Mohali by GMADA (Greater Mohali Area Development Authority) is an Aero City Expansion project in which estimated land around 5431 Acres of 14 villages have proposed to be acquired which is highly fertile in nature. The present study has focused on only 3 villages Patton,Kurari and Seon out of 14 villages, where 1305 acres of land have been proposed to be acquired in which project affected familes were interviewed by using qualitative method approach.This research paper attempts to explore the blatantly used land grab practices by the state authority in the name of development which turn out to be a great threat to the food security and loss of livelihood options for those whose land was acquired in the near future. The study will further focus on people’s perception regarding new development project initiated by GMADA. 
        Speaker: Dr. Sarbjeet Singh (Panjab University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Sport, Indigeneity and Globalization [Commission on the Anthropology on Sports]: P 47.1

      Room 2.100

      In 2010, the Haudenosaunee national lacrosse team was not allowed to enter the United Kingdom with their Haudenosaunee passports to participate in the World Fieldlacrosse Championship. This denial brought media interest to the role of sports for Indigenous societies, issues of sovereignty and international sport solidarity. During the last decades, Indigenous peoples have had a significant impact on the shape of global sport – Maori and other Polynesian players have influenced the rugby world and Samoan players – American football (Horton 2012, Uperesa and Mountjoy 2014). Although games of Indigenous peoples have been described by scholars since the founding of anthropology in the 19th century (Mooney 1890, Culin 1907), the role of sports for Indigenous societies has become ever more visible today due to the growing global forces impacting it. Relatively recently, both the local and transnational contexts of Indigenous sports have become the subjects of an increased interest of scholars (c.f. Hallinan and Judd 2013 for general context; Downey 2018; Forsyth and Giles 2013 for Native Americans; Foster 2006; Leach and Kildea 1976 for Trobriand Islanders; Light and Evans JR 2018; Tatz and Adair 2009; for Australian Aboriginal peoples; Krasilnikov 2015 for Khanty). This panel invites submissions from scholars who are concerned with any form of anthropological and ethnological research dealing with various forms of indigenization and glocalization of sport, sportization of Indigenous games, the role of sports in ethnoemancipation, representation, impacts of world sport events on local Indigenous societies and transnational global Indigenous identity.
      Conveners: Dr. Livia Savelkova (University of Pardubice), Dr. Zuzanna Kruk-Buchowska (Adam Mickiewicz University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.100
      • 11:00 Inter-tribalism, sporting legends and warrior culture: The unifying role of sports at Haskell Indian Nations University 20'
        Haskell Indian Nations University was created as a boarding school for Native American children and gradually transformed from an institution aimed at forcefully assimilating Indigenous children into American society, to one promoting Indigenous sovereignty. As an inter-tribal university, it helps Native students cushion the blow resulting from moving from the reservation to off-reservation communities. Sports continues to play an important role in this process as it helps create a feeling of unity, or even an inter-tribal Haskell identity.
        Since its beginning, seen as an efficient assimilating tool, sports has held an important place at the institution, with its athletic program creating nationally and internationally-renown football and basketball players, as well as track and field athletes. Thus, paradoxically, sports has also built pride in the students’ Native American identity. Famous Haskell athletes, including Jim Thorpe and Billy Mills, continue to serve as role models for the Haskell community today and the school’s sports legacy is invoked as part of its unique history and inspiration for its current athletes and students.
        Simultaneously, elements of the Lakota Indian ‘warrior culture’ (including its ‘warrior’ language) have been recently purposefully used to build unity at Haskell during sports events. Indeed, many Haskell athletes, spectators and other students have embraced it as part of their Native American culture, although they might come from tribes that do not share a similar tradition. As such, it has become something the community can relate to, and as something that distinguishes them from non-Native teams during sports events.
        Speaker: Dr. Zuzanna Kruk-Buchowska (Adam Mickiewicz University)
      • 11:20 No One is a Prophet in their Own Land: Josef Masopust and the Strange Trajectory of Czechoslovak Military Football 20'
        The foundation in the 1948 of an army football team, which later became famous as the Dukla Prague, was not only the first step to introduce the Soviet methods and style into the Czechoslovak sport, but also an attempt to reshape the allegiancies of Czechoslovak fans. It meant a step towards the further profesionalization of the Czech football as well. Dukla got a good fame in the early 1960's. Paradoxically it became more famous and respected abroad, above all in the capitalist countries, than at home. Even with four American Cups won consecutively and despite accounting for the nucleus of the successful Czechoslovak team in 1962, Dukla could'nt never overcome its bad fame of being "brass hat" and "cloned" team.
        The paper focuses on the attempt to institutionalize a new football identity that would serve the purposes of the Czechoslovak communist regime. Dealing with the successful but thorny career of Josef Masopust, (European Footballer of the Year in 1962), the paper will take an anthropological and biographical approach to demonstrate that even in the hottest moments of the Cold War, there could be a sympathy for a military football team from East in the West, and open hostility to it in an allegedly "totalitarian" country. The negative reactions towards Dukla, and Josef Masopust in particular, discussed even in the communist media, show how difficult it was for the regime to gain the hearts and minds of its population, and how far the regime was from becoming "totalitarian" or completely sovietized.
        Speaker: Dr. Radek Buben (Charles University)
      • 11:40 The Mesoamerican Ballgame as a Tool of Cultural Revitalization of Contemporary Maya Peoples 20'
        The contribution deals with the history of Mesoamerican ballgame - one of the typical elements of Mesoamerican culture area. First, it presents a set of its representative traits. Furthermore, it explains its social functions putting the emphasis on its ritualized form, since the Mesoamerican ballgame represents, in the first place, a standardized religious behavior related to the Mesoamerican cosmogony and cosmovision. The main objective of the speech is to show how the Mesoamerican ballgame, which started to fall into the oblivion after the Spaniards had come in America, can actually serve as a tool of revitalization of contemporary Maya peoples and their culture. In addition, it addresses the differences in revitalization strategies of national and local levels of integration policy, it means of the Mexican Government on the one hand and of Maya communities on the other taking into the consideration such problems and concepts as - identity formation, migration, nativism and indigenism.
        Speaker: Dr. Monika Brenišínová (Center for Ibero-American Studies, Charles University)
      • 12:00 Lacrosse between the West and the East: Refusal, Solidarity, and Recognition – attitudes toward Native Americans 20'
        Lacrosse, known generally as a stickball “game“ with its origin in North America, has been an important component in the lives of many Native Americans. Although the game was appropriated by Euro-Americans, became a tool of Canadian nation building as well as a tool of Native American assimilation in the 19th century, and became increasingly sporticized, lacrosse has remained an important element of Native American lives and societies. Banned from participation in Canadian tournaments and later also from international championships, Native American players finally entered the international competitive space after more than 100 years at the end of the 1980s, when the Iroquois Nationals became a member of the International Lacrosse Federation (ILF). With the end of the Cold War, European countries from the so-called socialist world had joined the international lacrosse organizations as well. Czechoslovakia played an important role not only in the development of box lacrosse in Europe, but also in a recognition of the indigenous roots of the game as well as of indigenous sovereignties. Based on my ethnographic research, the paper will analyze how different popular notions about Native Americans in different parts of the world led to various glocalized forms of the game, but may also lead to the recognition of the importance of Native players in lacrosse as well as political solidarity and recognition of indigenous sovereignties.
        Speaker: Dr. Livia Savelkova (University of Pardubice)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Researching Pastoral Solidarities: Exploring Methods and Frameworks [Commission on Nomadic Peoples]: P 32.1
      Inspired by the platform “pastoralism methodologies”, we call for abstracts which challenge underlying assumptions of conventional research methodologies when applied to the study of mobile pastoralists. The urge to work on research methodologies derives from an identified gap in literature. Renewed theoretical understandings of both rangeland ecology and pastoral strategies, have in fact remained unfollowed by discussions about what methods we apply when researching mobile people. Out of this gap, ‘scientific facts’ are produced and used by policy-makers, even though these may not be methodologically sound for the contemporary contexts of mobile people. It is therefore crucial to ask ourselves: What particular issues and challenges are found in these contexts? How can knowledge be produced in places of high variabilities? What is the role of new technology such as mobile phones or social media platforms, and other innovations, in the study of pastoralist mobilities? We call for contributions around three focal points for the development of research methodologies: (1) framework and epistemologies, including what understanding of the world shall be portrayed and how knowledge shall be produced in pastoral settings; (2) what data to collect, including current challenges within conventional units of reference and what solutions proposed; and (3) how to collect data, including issues of ethics, positionalities, and technological innovations. The goal is to prompt reflections on our language, our units of analysis, geographical and spatial references, tools and methods adopted, and broader research design to better fit the empirics of researching with mobile people.
      Conveners: Ms. Greta Semplici (University of Oxford), Dr. Erika Grasso (University of Turin)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.124
      • 11:00 Moving as being: pastoral mobility and its many faces 20'
        The death of nomadic pastoralism has been predicted over and over again. Yet, not only has it survived but also evolved and flourished. This paper proposes to push beyond technocratic explanations of mobility that see it solely as a livelihood strategy and to explore the everyday experiences of moving. It suggests looking at mobility as an integrated constellation of relationships produced by the unity of land-labour-livestock. These multilateral and interconnected relationships are dynamic and reflexive, both influenced by and in turn influencing the relationships within this constellation. Embedded within contexts of social and cultural power, and their own histories, the paper draws on the ‘spatial turn’ and ‘new mobilities paradigm’ within geography to propose a conceptual triad to unravel the constellation of pastoral mobility. Adapting Cresswell’s (2006, 2010) typology mobility can be seen as existing as perception (physical movement, and strategies and negotiations contained therein), conception (representation of movement in discourse and imagination, rumour and ritual) and experience (affective and relational aspects). Amidst calls to reinvestigate the scales at which research on pastoralism takes place, this method calls for a zooming in to re-evaluate the very frames of reference from which research takes place, and understand the changing nature of mobility from the perspective of the pastoralist. This new understanding may help to explain why mobility persists, how it evolves in response to changing circumstances, and in turn how it is deployed to bypass, overcome, adapt to and/or alter these circumstances.
        Speaker: Natasha Maru (Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex)
      • 11:20 Pastoralists as commoners and the challenge of its analysis 20'
        Pastoralists all over the world tend be very community- oriented societies. This includes their understanding of rangeland as a commons. In the Alps in Germany, for example, the word commons etymologically even originates from the word pasture. While within the research of commons; a lot of methodological considerations have been made, none of them account for the specificity of pastoralists as mobile people and critically reflect on them. In this paper, I look at the methodology used when analyzing land as a commons and how this translates to pastoralist research. How can research best account for that which makes up pastoralists, i.e. a very close and communally-shaped human-environment-relation? Is it useful to relate research findings to frameworks that revolve around the commons, or should more open approaches be preferred? Can established commons methodologies account well for people on the move? A specific focus will be on analyzing the advantages and yet challenges that commons research has with regards to focusing on local rules and regulations and how this can be translated to people on the move.
        Speaker: Dr. Jill Philine Blau (University of Friedensau)
      • 11:40 Mobile Livelihoods and Urban Development: Researching Turkana pastoralists from 1987 to 2018 20'
        In my PhD research conducted between 1989 and 1994 in Lodwar I came to the conclusion that pastoral and urban livelihoods are closely connected. Pastoral households rely on an urban branch of the household not only to access education and health services but also as a way of diversifying the family income. Income generated in the informal sector of the urban settlements served as an insurance in the time of drought and conflicts in the pastoral areas. Vice versa, livelihoods in town often depended on the relationship to the pastoral areas. For instance, school fees were paid by selling livestock. The boundaries between urban and rural life seemed to be fluid. The narratives of the people independently of living in Lodwar or in the pastoral areas showed a great extent of spatial and social mobility. In the context of my PhD research I conceptualized Lodwar as a pastoral town – a town, which connects Turkana pastoralists to the nation state and the market economy. In the paper I want to address how the recent economic change and the development of Lodwar has influenced these linkages and how it has affected the livelihoods of Turkana people. Economic Development does not only mean more roads, permanent buildings, banks and taxi services but also the commercialization of urban land and the monetization of social relationships. The paper is based on interviews and participants observation during short field visits from 2011 to 2018 and reflections on past researches conducted between 1987 and 1995.
        Speaker: Prof. Ulrike Schultz (Adventist University Friedensau)
      • 12:00 The urban space as resource. Everyday practices, identities and space in a small town of Northern Kenya 20'
        This paper focuses on methods adopted while enquiring the spatial dimension of everyday practices in a small town of Nothern Kenya. In a national context of perceived and actual marginalisation of the northern provinces and pastoral/nomadic groups, Marsabit urban space emerge as the result of an on going negotiation by which subjectivities define and re-define themselves. A relational approach to the space revelead the double nature of Marsabit: peripheral and central. Despite Marsabit is regarded as marginal in the national urban system, the town and the mountain where it lies play a pivotal role on migratory movements of mobile people in the region since ever. Centre of the network of villages spread in the region, the city is a space connected with the rural space it is surronded by and where it is possible to observe pracitices related not only with social and ethnic identities, but also with the access to resources and that involve groups caracterized by a common pastoral and nomadic background. The paper whish to reflect on the contribution of relational approach to the spatial practices to the study of mobile people in urban context in order to recognize the role of political, ethnic and spatial mobilities.
        Speaker: Dr. Erika Grasso (University of Turin)
      • 12:20 Pastures new? Measuring pastoralist poverty dynamics with a retrospective household survey 20'
        Ethiopia’s lower Omo valley is a historically marginal periphery, now being transformed by mega-dams and industrial plantation agriculture, which is home to many traditional agro-pastoralist groups. This paper describes the methodological challenges faced by a project (inspired by Krishna’s ‘Stages of Progress’ methodology) which set out to gauge the impact of these recent developments by implementing a retrospective survey of changes in wealth and poverty in an agro-pastoralist community over the last twenty years. Firstly, the unit of analysis, the household, proved problematic: this is a setting where polygamous, multi-local households act as seasonally mobile and geographically dispersed units of production, where a strong moral economy encourages redistribution between households, and where gender roles means knowledge/access to resources differs markedly between household members. Others problems arose because survey respondents had little schooling or exposure to social research; for example, many pastoralists used a very different style of historical and temporal reckoning based upon locally salient, but officially unrecorded, past events. Finally, while the original project methodology emphasized using local measures of prosperity, understandings of poverty/wealth during this period of profound change were socially situated, multiple and contested. Traditional pastoralist understandings of wealth had important limitations; focusing on family and herd size, the underlying ideology provided little acknowledgement of important measures of privation and exclusion such as lack of access to education or food insecurity. The paper considers each of these methodological challenges in turn, outlining how the project addressed them and the advantages and disadvantages of the working solutions adopted.
        Speaker: David Paul Pertaub (University of Sheffield)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Protect Indigenous cultural heritage for Survival [Commission on museum and cultural heritage]: P 34.1

      Room 2.4

      Protect Indigenous cultural heritage for Survival: Indigenous knowledge related to social, economic, cultural, religious, educational life of the Indigenous communities.It also relates to agriculture, shifting cultivation, hunting, food gathering, fishing, pastoralism, basket making, rope making, iron melting, drumming etc.Its practices also relates to Survival of nature and animal kingdom. Thus in local and global levels require to protect the Indigenous cultural heritage and it's solidarity.
      Conveners: Dr. Satya Narayan Munda (Dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee University, Ranchi), Dr. Mohan Kant Gautam (European University of West and East)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.4
      • 11:00 Indigenous Cultural Heritage of Uttarakhand Himalaya and its Protection 20'
        The Uttarakhand Himalaya is inhabitted by five scheduled tribes,namely,Jaunsari,Bhotia,Bhoksa,Tharu and Raji.These tribes exhibit distinctive cultural heritage,such as fraternal polygynandry of the Jaunsari,transhumance of the Bhotia,land alienation of the Bhoksa,woman dominance of the patrilineal Tharu and invisible trading of the Raji.All these cultural traits can be depicted by way of artefacts in the ethnographic museum.A case study of Prof.K.S.Mathur Ethnographic Museum at Lucknow(India) has been done by the author for depiction,protection and survival of the indigenous culture of these tribes.
        Speaker: Dr. Ajai Pratap Singh (Lucknow University)
      • 11:20 Conservation of bio-diversities and tradition in Sacred Groves: A study in the tribal Villages in West Bengal India 20'
        Sacred groves are the patches of the forests or tees, which are the abodes of the trees and spirits and reflect the regious affiliations as the deities are either worshipped or venerated. The ethnic identity is also viewed. As an Institution it also interprets preservation and conservation of plants, herbs, climbers, existing in the place. here are good number of medicinal plants is available in the sacred groves, which depict the ethno-medicinal traditions. The present sacred groves or trees though small in size, in essence presents the traditional way in situ conservation of plants and forests. This also provides social space,wherein tribals renew cultural identities and find social solidarity. 
          Attempts has been made in this paper studying sacred grives in the tribal villages of West Bengal of India with the illustrations of festivals,festivities and rituals showung conservation of bio-diversities and tradition & cultural heritage.
        Speaker: Debashis Debnath (Indian Institute of Forest Management)
      • 11:40 Cultural heritage of Munda Tribe:A case study of Ranchi-khunti (Jharkhand) , India 20'
        Cultural heritage of Munda Tribe: A case study of Ranchi-khunti (Jharkhand), India. Population of Munda Tribe is 1229221(according to 2011 census) in the state of Jharkhand. They also reside in the states of Orissa, Bengal, Bihar, Assam, Chattisgarh, etc. Traditionally material and non-material culture of the Munda Tribe is on food culture and forest for Survival.Their primary source of livelihood is agriculture and secondary sources are food collection, lac collection, pastoralism, labour, fishing, etc.To highlight the fact's, A case study of Ranchi-khunti have been taken. For preservation of the socio-cultural life of the Munda Tribe, it's require museum for education and Indigenous Knowledge and require expansion.
        Speaker: Dr. Satya Narayan Munda (Dr. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee University, Ranchi)
      • 12:00 Traditional Belief System & Sustainable Development: PVTGs of Odisha 20'
        Traditional belief system of the PVTGs can be considered as the most significant factor in the sphere of conservation of nature preserved purely by the virtue of their applied faith and traditional practices. The study of traditional belief system assumes importance from the point of view of biodiversity conservation as well as sustainability. Very few works have been carried out on traditional belief system and significance of applied faith of the PVTGs especially of the Kutia Khonds and Dongria Khonds vis-a-vis nature conservation and sustainable development. Further, we posit that a more inclusive and all encompassing conceptual framework of “Faith-Application-Sustainable Practice complex” (FASP complex) can reinforce the IKS model. “Application and Practice” aspect of the tribal communities’ resource management approach are only implicitly invoked in the IKS model. The rationale of the present approach of FASP complex is to emphasize on application and sustainability practice of these communities as their core living experiences. The proposed FASP complex puts “Application of the belief system (faith) of the PVTGs” as the driving force for sustainability through practices that are sustainable. Thus the emphasis of the study was on collection of information on the carriers of traditional belief system and values, legends, lore, myths, rituals, festivals etc. of these PVTGs and the correlation between their traditional belief system and applied faith towards safeguarding the phenomena of the physical world they live. Another important aspect of the present study is, interpretation of the collected data in the framework of “Faith-Application-Sustainable Practice complex”.
        Speaker: Dr. ANJALI KURANE (SAVITRIBAI PHULE PUNE UNIVERSITY , DEPARTMENT O ANTHROPOLOGY)
      • 12:20 The Kharia: the change in occupation from indigenous to modernity. 20'
        The Kharia is one of the vulnerable tribe residing in Odisha, Jharkhand and West Bengal. Linguistically they belong to Austro-Asiatic group; they usually live in the forest and its periphery. As such their economy and survival is totally depending on the forest products. They have their own way of collecting mechanism for each of them.
        The present study carried out in Simlipal hill region of Odisha. Administratively, they are referred as food gatherer and hunter since their economy revolves around the forest and forest product. One of their main economic is the collection of honey from forest. They move in a small group of 6-8 people to identify the bee-pocket. The identification work is done during day time but actual collection of honey takes place during night. The most interesting part is their collection in the most indigenous way with smoke technique. They are expert in tree climbing, for collection purpose. Wax is also sold in the market but unfortunately, the honey selling is limited in the market because of homely bee keeping practice encouraged by non-government organization as an income earning activity.
          Due to bee- keeping by other people, the Kharias are finding it difficult to sustain on honey collection. Thus they have also adopted working as laborers and also practicing kitchen garden. They consume the vegetables and also sell them in the local market. It is found, that the Kharia people have a partial shift from their traditional occupation to farming and labor works.
        Speaker: Dr. Debasish Giri (Kolhan University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Morality, research, and the refugee crisis: P 33.1

      Room 3.19

      Moral anthropology, aimed at studying the „moral making of the world” (Fassin, 2012), is a growing subfield of anthropological and ethnological sciences. Among other issues, moral anthropology addresses debates about values and emotions, moral duty and ethical freedom, and human rights and humanitarianism, including the responsibility of the researcher and the legal regulation of research in such undertakings. The European ""refugee crisis,"" a term used to discuss the increased numbers of migrants arriving - by boats or overland - in the European Union beginning in 2015, is often considered a crisis of European response to the conflict in Syria and the resulting humanitarian crisis at the borders of Europe. The convenors would like to create a space to discuss the role of moral values in the „refugee crisis,” the integration challenges upon arrival in Europe, as well as anthropological research opportunities, limits and risks involved in studying people and social phenomena during humanitarian crises. We invite researchers to address such topics as: - humanitarian responses to refugee crises - residents’ solidarity with immigrants - conflicts over religious and secular values in relation to migration - moral, social, and political responsibilities of researchers, activists, and politicians - morality and moral values from different disciplinary perspectives in the social sciences and the humanities.
      Conveners: Dr. Izabella Main (Center for Migraton Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University), Dr. Brigitte Suter (Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare, Malmö University), Ms. Izabela Kujawa (Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.19
      • 11:00 Hip hop and refugees in Poznań, Poland 20'
        A hip hop band in Poznań that unites Muslim performers with Yemeni background and autochthonous Polish youth, builds grassroots solidarities. NGOs, youth groups, social workers, an imam, and state authorities all play a role in countering Islamophobic stereotypes by supporting this activity, each in their own way.
         
        Three brothers with a Polish mother and a Yemeni father came to Poland as refugees from the civil war in Yemen. Residents of Poznań, they are regular attendees at the local Islamic Centre. The director of a reformatory school for juvenile delinquents invited the brothers to perform at the school and to teach residents to rap. Some of the residents have since joined the three brothers in an expanded hip hop band. Because of the brothers’ sharply anti-racist and politically progressive lyrics, the audience includes some of the town’s anarchists and other radical activists, but more “moderate” mainstream youth are also regularly present.
         
        Participant observation and structured interviews reveal that attitudes to Muslims and migrants have been positively affected by people’s exposure to the band. Yet in some cases Islamophobic attitudes persist, and simply see the “Yemeni” brothers as an exemption. We consider the activities of the band and their interlocutors as a set of small-scale, local moral practices by various actors whose interests do not always coincide. We also look at the higher-scale political, economic, and cultural contexts that can work in the opposite direction. Of these, the influence of right-wing, nationalist rap on some Polish youth is particularly relevant.
        Speaker: Mrs. Anna Adamowicz (Institute of Philosophy)
      • 11:20 Outsiders' ethic. How to take a humanitarian stance from a distance? 20'
        Are we, Europeans, capable enough to understand the complexity of the Syrian conflict and take one of the sides? Or, the only thing we can do is not adopt a particular political stance but adopt a distinctive humanitarian attitude? But, is it possible to be impartial without being neutral?
          
          I try to answer those questions through the exploration of the Poznań Garage Sale for Refugees case study, a charity garage sale of clothes, shoes, books, and knick-knacks harvested from the backs of our closets. We donate the money collected during this event to support the refugee center in Athens and hospitals in Yemen.
          
          I am part of this civic and bottom-up initiative since 2017, and I’m conducting a participant observation of it. Furthermore, I am also doing interviews with a core team of the Sale, especially those that go as volunteers to help refugees in situ, in Athens or by the Polish-Byelorussian border.
          
          Among us, we often criticize the ‘neutrality of humanitarianism’ rule, the way NGO’s deciding how to allocate resources, or how states shape moral decisions. So, why we are doing this? And, what we are doing to make the relief more effective? 
          
          These aren’t questions about values but the form of helping. In the same vein, Abend, Bargheer, and Wilson distinguish between morality as a category or form, and moral values as content. The latter might change, while the former stays the same, or vice versa.
          
          Paper is based on my National Science Centre grant “Tacit morality” (2015/19/N/HS6/01682)
        Speaker: Dr. Waldemar Rapior (Independent researcher)
      • 11:40 Conducting fieldwork on norms and values in the field of integration after ‘the refugee crisis’: early reflections from Poland and Sweden 20'
        The paper is based on fieldwork undertaken as part of the project NoVaMigra (Norms and Values in the European Migration and Refugee Crisis), financed through the EU’s Horizon2020 framework (2018-21). With the EU’s value (or identity) crisis as a point of departure, this interdisciplinary project examines normative commitments of the European Union and eight of its Member States with a particular focus of how these plays out in the field of migration and integration.
          Our paper then presents preliminary insights from ongoing fieldwork on the role of norms and values in the field of immigrant and societal integration in Poland, Hungary, Sweden and Germany. The study maps ‘value agents’ in this field, and explores in-depth which values are enacted, on what basis, and against/towards whom. ‘Value agents’ are defined as actors conveying values, both specifically to immigrants and to the general public. ‘Value practices’can be defined as those processes and routines through which the values are being conveyed. A central focus are tensions or dilemmas between different values. Values considered of particular importance are gender equality, religious pluralism and humanitarianism. Theoretically then our paper then turns towards anthropological work on value(s) (Graeber (2001; 2013),the gift (Mauss) and exchange (Gregory 2015; Tsing 2013) to see what kind of understandingof the role of norms and values in integration practices can be elucidated. The paper ends with reflections from a critical moral anthropology (Fassin 2012).
        Speaker: Brigitte Suter (Dep of Global Political Studies, Malmö Institute for Studies of Migration, Diversity and Welfare (MIM))
      • 12:00 Syrian victims or Gypsy thieves: Racializing migrant inclusion on the Parisian periphery. 20'
        A growing body of research illuminates ways in which France’s “social question,” “question of immigration,” and “refugee crisis” have become infused with racial discourse. The empirical cases within these studies often frame racialization across a significant power differential. This research turns to the production of racialized distinction between individuals already marked as Other: interactions between Syrian Doms, Romanian Roms, and their often-Muslim, immigrant-descendant neighbors on the northern periphery of Paris. While the Doms successfully solicit sympathy and stand in for the promise of universalist hospitality, Roms often elicit stigma and symbolize the failures of the European project. What might these divergent responses reveal not just about Roma and Dom presence in public space, but minority claims on inclusion? This co-authored contribution draws on ethnographic cases between 2015 and the present with each population in the same municipality. Through performance in and occupation of public space, these groups successfully confound a binary distinction between deserving refugees and unfit migrants. In so doing, they reveal religious and racial particularity as a majoritarian means of drawing moral boundaries around inclusion, and as a tactic from below to claim one’s dignity and rights. We advance an understanding of ethnic boundary-making and provide empirical grounds for identifying the operation of moral economies of immigration from below. Humanitarian claims on deservingness are not just administrative tools, but can be performed and appropriated in everyday interaction.
        Speaker: Henry Shah (Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Exploring Southern solidarities: P 44.1

      Room 3.106

      This panel contemplates historical and contemporary experiences of solidarity in Southern contexts. A current definition of solidarity springs from notions of common interest or intra group support. However, we owe to P.Kropotkin a notion of solidarity strongly tied up to the concept of mutual aid, which means, above of all, solidarity between diverse and even opposite groups of interest. For Kropotkin, as well as for Rousseau, in his definition of pitié, the shared ground for solidarity is the most encompassing category of sentient life. Taking up the kropotkinian challenge, our debate will take into account historical and contemporary situations when solidarity was or is established among distinctive categories or groups. In this vein, we will be discussing solidarities established across boundaries, be they interspecies, interethnic, intercultural, as well as other forms of solidarity, in order to explore their actors, networks and the values they put in action. Departing from ethnography, this panel will interrogate eventual singularities of or novelties brought by these social experiences in the Global South and, in particular, Latin America.
      Conveners: Dr. Nádia Farage (Dept of History/ Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences/ University of Campinas), Dr. Lisa Grund (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.106
      • 11:00 Predation and compassion: other relationships between humans and animals in aquatic environments on the Amazon 20'
        Human-wildlife interactions from hunting and fishing on the Amazon are narrated in the travel accounts by ancient naturalists from the 18th and 19th centuries, in experiences lived by inhabitants of coastal and riverside communities, and are also a subject of constant conservationist policies for defense of certain animal species (some of them, vulnerable to extinction). Possible tensions between environmentalism and extractivism are reflected in the government’s actions to monitoring and regulating subsistence practices - especially fishing - within these communities, as well as in the ecological sensitivities sometimes raised by individual actors (environmentalists, researchers and the local fishermen themselves, among others) in such contexts. In the face of predation as a constant event of interspecies relations in Amazonian environments, it becomes important to consider other possibilities of interaction, beyond more specific cosmologies of a plural Amazon (and that is not exclusively indigenous). Regarding the ecological sensitivities and the legal status of certain animal species - such as aquatic mammals (cetaceans, sirenians, etc.) -, the approach to this theme within the anthropological studies on the Amazon still requires a more accurate contribution. Based on an ethnography carried out in two distinct poles of the Amazon basin, this presentation focuses on human interactions with local aquatic fauna, starting from the approach of predatory practices and their legal and moral developments in fluvial and marine contexts, reconstituting a historicity of these interspecific relations and of the biopolitical condition of the species involved in the extractive fishery of the Amazon.
        Speaker: Guilherme Antunes (Universidade Estadual de Campinas)
      • 11:20 Tales of terror: when dissection awaits 20'
        The paper intends to address a Brazilian short story from 1917, by Gastão Cruls, and a true story from London in the late 18th century. As protagonists, the ailing nurse Paulino, and the 8 ft 4'' tall Charles Byrne, known as the “Irish giant”: two unfortunate men who just realized they are about to die, dreadfully aware that their bodies, regarded as scientific curiosities and rather coveted by certain anatomists, are threatened to undergo dissection procedures, and end up in lab cabinets, medical treatises, or even pieces of collection. Nurse Paulino, object of a master class in pathological anatomy, haunted by his awareness of the medical code “G. C. P. A.” in his report – initials that stood for “keep corpse for autopsy” –, and C.Byrne, persecuted in life by John Hunter — a renowned anatomist trying to bargain a price for his corpse —, are both abruptly condemned by unmerciful doctors, avid for dissecting their remains. Far from conforming to a destiny of scientific objects, wroth and terrified, they urge to scape it, taking measures to make sure they remain masters of their bodies, and rest in peace. Sadly, their agency is no match for the power of men of science’s wills, and they fail to overcome it. Those stories, filled with terror and pitié, are powerful to enlighten debates on the scientific uses of corpses of poor, “monstrous” and ungrieved bodies, that pair to those of a countless multitude of animals in the hands of men of science.
        Speaker: Giulia Levai (University of Campinas - Institute of Philosophy and the Humanities)
      • 11:40 Mutual aid revisited 20'
        This paper considers the theoretical possibilities of the Kropotkian notion of “mutual aid”, when applied to current anthropological debates on interspecies and other relationships. 
          Although coined for a dated debate with darwinism, the notion was fruitful not only for contemporary anarchist social theory, but also for anthropological theory, be it the contemporary evolutionism of Lewis Morgan, or the ulterior approach of C.Lévi-Strauss to interspecies interaction.
          Springing from Romantic radicalism, Kropotkin’s conceptualisation presupposed two crucial correlate premises: the social and solidaire character of all interactions intra and inter-species; and the sentient life network in a hazardous natural world. Parallel to Rousseau’s pieté, mutual aid or solidarity broke through species or other barriers, extendable to sentient life as a whole. Thus, the sentient living being is at the analytical core of Kropotkian theory - a definition which is worth retrieving to address the present dilemmas of the discipline.
        Speaker: Dr. Nádia Farage (University of Campinas)
      • 12:00 Macoushi cattle and sociality circuits 20'
        This paper focuses interspecies solidarity, taking up the case of cattle and the Macoushi, a Carib-speaking people on the Guianese shield, Brasil/Guiana border.
          The Macoushi has been raising cattle for more than two centuries, since cattle was introduced by Portuguese colonizers in the end of 18thcentury. This is an extensive cattle-raising, which follows not only seasons, but also social mobility. The presence of cattle was also a powerful tool in the struggle for land. At first glance, this pattern of human-animal relationships can be said to be present in all pastorialist peoples. However, this paper seeks to explore the peculiar sociality that emerges from such interspecies relationship, in particular the gradient of social distance and how it affects Macoushi conceptualization of cattle’s autonomy and non-ownership.
        Speaker: Paulo José Brando Santilli (São Paulo Estate University)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Culture and Biology of Indigenous People: P 38.1

      Room 3.94

      Indigenous people or tribal/ ethnic minorities constitute a large percentage of global population. They have a historical background and identity, independent of the countries within the boundaries of which they are located. On the one hand, many of such indigenous populations can suffer from malnutrition, high morbidity and mortality. Moreover, some ethnic populations are burdened with certain genetic disorders, such as sickle cell haemoglobin or thalassemia. Poverty, illiteracy, poor nutrition and low health awareness contribute to their poor health status. Little do we know about beliefs, customs and practices of indigenous people in relation to health and disease, and the manner in which their way of life affects health status. On the other hand, studies have highlighted changes in the style and quality of life in indigenous populations, especially the ones from the developing world. In many countries of Europe, Asia and America the economic situation of tribal people has changed along with economic and social transformations. The indigenous groups respond to them by the rising morbidity and mortality rates due to infectious diseases and non-communicable diseases (including obesity, diabetes or hypertension). The epidemiological and demographic transitions are caused by urbanized lifestyle, unhealthy dietary practices and increasingly common sedentary lifestyle. The panel we propose seeks to create a platform for sharing results of interdisciplinary research, concerning changes in fertility, mortality, body size (height, weight and BMI), age at menarche, health and nutrition status over time, setting them in the broadly understood cultural context.
      Conveners: Dr. Grażyna Liczbińska (Department: Faculty of Biology, Institution: Institute of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University), Dr. Rajesh K. Gautam (Department of Anthropology Dr. Harisingh Gour Vishwavidyalaya (A Central University))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.94
      • 11:00 Transforming Healthcare System among Juang Tribe: A Case study of a PVTG of India 20'
        Changing socio-economic scenario and the impact of the developmental plans and policies of government for the upliftment of the tribal communities at large have brought about a lot of transformation among these tribal communities. The major transformation and changes among the tribal societies are prominently visible in the sector of their healthcare system. The tribal communities who were earlier deprived of modern medicine and medical facilities have now gained access to various medical assistances such as healthcare institutions, doctors, medicines, consultation, free medical aid and lot more. While access to modern medicine and facilities has become easier, simultaneously its presence among the tribals has also affected their belief on traditional healthcare system as well. This has led to a situation where the tribal communities are facing problem and confusion to adhere to a single healthcare system, being unable to neither follow the traditional medicine nor accept the modern medicine. The paper discusses about such a situation of healthcare system among Juangs, a Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Group (PVTG) of Keonjhar District of Odisha in India who have been staying in the forest areas for years together being socially excluded from the so called mainstream population. The instances of Iron Nailing (chenka) on skin of new born babies, malaria instances and lethal skin diseases among the Juangs of Keonjhar district is quite prevalent. While some of them have strong belief in the traditional healthcare system, many have also shifted to modern medicine and medical assistance or has belief on both.
        Speaker: Dr. SAMPRITI PANDA (B.J.B. Autonomous College)
      • 11:20 The Process of Kinship: How Ideas Remake the World 20'
        This paper compares, using agent-based simulation, a conventional view of kinship as genealogically based to an approach reflecting entities and relations as interacting processes partially determined by prehensive surfaces emerging from the structure of relationships reflected in kinship terminologies. One remarkable aspect of humans is a capacity to not just generate new symbolic understandings of the world, but to leverage these to change the world in fundamental and material ways. This is achieved, in part, through how shared symbols coordinate community activities, impacting and influencing individual agency within a range that results in sustainable but still adaptive outcomes that can extend the range into new directions in future. Kinship as a system of relationships is deep-rooted in all human societies, and key to stabilising many cooperative interchanges. The conventional view is to see kinship relations as reflecting a culturally specific view of geneological relationships. However, applying this results in anomolies reconciling ongoing demographic processes with the relationships that underlie the structure of kinship terminologies. In part, this arises because in this view individuals are ontologically entities serially buffeted by products of change. An alternative, following A. Whitehead, depicts ontologically individuals as ongoing processes, recognized in most socieites well beyond their lifespan. In this formulation kinship relations increase the potentiality of multiple people cooperating in higher order processes emerging from the instantiation of this potentiality. These relationships constrain agency in a prehensive manner to accomodate the potentialities of the shared local principles governing the relationshps reflected in the kinship terminology.
        Speaker: Dr. Michael Fischer (University of Kent)
      • 11:40 Hope and Quality of Life of Pregnant Women 20'
        This is part of larger study which gives insights into the Croatian Islands' Birth Cohort Study (CRIBS) with a focus on hope and health-related quality of life (QoL). The aims of the study were to investigate determinants of the QoL of pregnant women and hope as potential predictor of QoL domains. Hope is based on an individuals’ perception and thought processes regarding their ability to achieve desired goals; as mental motivation to initiate and sustain movement toward goals, as well as perceived ability to generate strategies or pathways to attain one's goals. The sample consisted of 302 healthy pregnant women (18 to 28 weeks of gestation) involved from February 2016 to June 2018, using WHOQoL-bref, Adult Hope Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and the perceived stress appraisals. Subjective QoL of pregnant women appears to be very high in all four domains but structure of predictors differs. The greatest variance was explained in Psychological health domain (42%) and the smallest in Physical health (25%). Two hope subscales explained greatest variance of all QoL domains (9.5% to 27.5%), except Physical domain. Hope agency was individual predictor of all four domains, where women with greater hope had greater QoL. Women with greater sense of being able to generate successful plans to meet goals (Hope pathway) had greater individual perception of QoL only related to Psychological health and Environment. Results will discuss theoretical and research frameworks of hope, psychological adjustment and health within the cultural context.
        Speaker: Dr. Eva Anđela Delale (Institute for Anthropological Research)
      • 12:00 Forest and Livelihood of Pandos: a Case Study af a Tribe in Surajpur District, Chhattisgarh 20'
          Varsha Sandilya,
          Department of Anthropology,
          University of Delhi,
          varsha.sandilya@gmail.com
          
          India is the home of different tribal groups which reflects its great ethnic diversity. There are 705 (8.6%) tribes living in different parts of the country and from these tribal groups 42 (30.62%) tribal groups are belongs to Chhattisgarh including 5 Particular Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTGs). Pando tribe is one of the important tribal groups residing in the state of Chhattisgarh. It is mainly found in adjoining area of Bilaspur, Surajpur and Surguja district. The overall estimated pando population is 30,000 spreaded and dispersed over 307 villages only. The pando tribe subsist largely on the collection of forest produce and cultivation of coarse grain, making baskets and selling firewood’s is another is another means of livelihood. Pando are one of the most socially and economically backword tribe, still living in the dense forest area and highly dependent on forest. Objective of the study is looking deeply to understand the forest and livelihood pattern of Pandos. 
          The research is based on ethnographic approach and the data was collect from primary and secondary source. It contains both Qualitative as well as Quantitative data, the primary data was collected through schedule, questionnaire, interview, case study, and focus group discussion method. Similarly secondary source of data was collected from Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Ministry of tribal affaires, Tribal research institute and Internet etc.
        Speaker: VARSHA SANDILYA (UNIVERSITY OF DELHI)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Customary laws in natural resource management and sustainable development: issues and challenges for indigenous communities in Asia: P 39.1

      Room 3.160

      Dispossession of traditional lands and natural resources is one of the major problems of the indigenous/tribal peoples all over the world. Very recently, the Millennium Development Goals, Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Act and several regional and thematic workshops have realised that the security of rights to territories, lands and natural resources of the indigenous/tribal communities is the most powerful indicator relevant to indigenous people’s well-being and sustainable development. A global synthesis report on Indicators of Indigenous Peoples’ Well-being, Poverty and Sustainability was submitted to the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in 2008. It stressed that the process of dispossession has been going on for centuries, first as a result of the intrusion of colonial systems and the ever growing search for rich agricultural areas and natural wealth; today, as a result of development policies and globalization. The positivist school of legal jurisprudence along with market oriented economist argue that the rule of law having organized government and legal commands guarantees private property rights in the modern state societies and governance. contrary to it, the empirical/anthropological findings on cases for and against the public production of law and enforcement from the primitive legal systems are questioning; the legal positivists because they apparently represent examples of law and order without a state government and economists who assume that the state must establish and enforce private property rights. This panel tries to explore instances of conflict between customary/depoliticised laws of indigenous communities and the politicised/provincial laws of the modern state worldwide.
      Conveners: Dr. DEBENDRA BISWAL (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF JHARKHAND), Dr. JOAO DANTAS (FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF SERGIPE), Dr. ABEL POLESE (TALLIN UNIVERSITY)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.160
      • 11:00 Beyond Intellectual Property Rights: State Ownership Versus Community Rights over Traditional Knowledge of the Tribal Communities in India 20'
        One school of statutory state environmental laws argue that the indigenous and local communities are alienated from their traditional knowledge on bio-resources, access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilization under the Intellectual Property and Access to Benefit Sharing (ABS) paradigm. These are designed to protect commercial inventions and mostly grant individual and exclusive rights, reflects western laws, there are gaps in their alignment with indigenous peoples’ perspectives, needs and aspirations. Contrary to this approach, the present paper is based on an anthropological fieldwork among the Munda and Oraon tribal communities in the state of Jharkhand, India to prove that the customary principles of reciprocity, duality and equilibrium is seriously lacking in protecting traditional knowledge on forest, plant verities and genetic resources. Secondly, it critically examines the process of privatization of community knowledge due to present state laws in India and how the sovereign rights of the state over natural and genetic resources contradicts rights of the indigenous communities. Finally it argues for customary sui generis system consistent with indigenous and local communities, determining rights over resources, procedures for PIC and equitable sharing. Rather than advocating for state ownership over natural resources as seen by the IPR and ABS paradigm, customary laws often have a strong spiritual character, being closely interlinked with belief systems associated with natural resources and landscapes. They are often based on fundamental values of respect for nature, social equity and harmony, and serving the common good.
        Speaker: Dr. DEBENDRA BISWAL (CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF JHARKHAND)
      • 11:20 Customs and Conflicts in Tribal Areas of Jharkhand, India 20'
        The situation become worst when the concurrent government tried to amend the Chhotanagpur Tenancy Act. The anger burst out in the form of pathalgadi. Pathalgadi is basically a way to demarcate the territories of Mundari villages. The Pathalgadis have accused the government of snatching away the rights of the tribal people of Jharkhand, while the government has declared them illegal. The situation become worst when the concurrent government tried to amend the Chhotanagpur Tenancy Act. This law prohibited the transfer of tribal land to non-tribals while favouring community ownership. The anger burst out in the form of pathalgadi. Pathalgadi is basically a way to demarcate the territories of Mundari villages and it is proclaimed that the outsiders (government officials) are not allowed to in without the permission of traditional gram sabha. The Pathalgadis have accused the government of snatching away the rights of the tribal people of Jharkhand, while the government has declared them illegal. In the above backdrop, this paper has tried to analyse all the incidences of conflicts between Munda tribe and the government after creation of Jharkhand and explored the reasons behind them. It has also analysed few Mundari customs viz- Munda-Manki, Land Ownership and Death Rituals in concurrent situation and myths and facts related with them. The findings of this paper is based on both secondary and primary data.
        Speaker: Dr. GangaNath Jha (Vinoba Bhave University)
      • 11:40 Autonomy, Self-Governance and the dilemmas of Pathalgadi Movement in Tribal Areas of Jharkhand: A Socio-Legal Inquiry 20'
        Tribal communities in India are having a predominantly distinct system of self-governance. It has successfully worked in establishing an orderly structure of their social habitation. Each tribal community in India is having its own system of governance. Of many in India, the system of governance among tribal communities of Jharkhand known as pathalgadi has its own distinctness. It has evolved by time and has resulted in establishing a common system of governance for multiple tribal communities. The State, until recently has maintained a policy of non-intervention in their socio-political organization. But now departing from its previous stand, it has started frequently intervening in their autonomy and system of governance. On the pretext of various issues like prevalent illicit trade and drug-trafficking, the State use to justify its policies. Of many, it is the security concerns which are employed on regular basis. Militant forces called Naxalites, which are at conflict with State are defined as the major threat to peace and security. And on this ground, State justifies intervention. It is alleged that tribal system of governance the pathalgadi is major obstacle that prevent State from implementing its policies. It has now started delegitimizing them only to facilitate its interventionist policies. State is alleged of intervention with the objective of extracting natural resources for private gains of few individual business houses while tribal communities contrarily are alleged of supporting anti-national forces which are threat to peace and security of the region. 
        Speaker: Dr. Ashok Nimesh (Central University of Jharkhand)
      • 12:00 Questioning the legal pluralism: Access to Land and issues to governance in tribal areas of Odisha, India 20'
        Governance in relation to land revolves around four major issues- land ownership, land rights, land acquisition, transfer & alienation and land holding status. In India, A large number of areas predominantly inhabited by Adivasis had been declared to be Excluded/Partially Excluded Areas during the British period. After the Constitution of India came into effect, the Fifth and Sixth Schedules were incorporated into the Constitution by the founding fathers. The Fifth Schedule designates power to the President of India to declare certain specified areas as Scheduled Areas. This paper has tried to examine the instances of conflict between customary/depoliticised laws of indigenous/tribal/adivasi communities and the politicised/provincial laws of the modern state, how the social and cultural customary system of the Adivasi in many respects manifests their community organisation and a system of governance. The new state laws introduced to them accepted their local and village customary practices, but in reality it adversely affected the community system and their political association. How do the Adivasis identify themselves? Could the practice of customary system/ law of Adivasis prove their distinctiveness as a historic community and why do people feel there is a need for reviving these pre-colonial Customary Systems as a model in post-colonial times. Finally, How has the development of the modern State, directly or indirectly been responsible for preventing the Adivasis for developing their own social-political organizations for their autonomous governance? What has it resulted into? In this situation what kind of challenges it poses for the Adivasis of Odisha, India.
        Speaker: NIBEDITA BHOI (BAR COUNCIL OF ORISSA)
      • 12:20 Development Induced Displacement and Tribal Land Rights in Mining Areas of Jharkhand & Odisha 20'
        The tribal inhabited land of Jharkhand and Odisha remained in controversy over issues of development and displacement in India. The tribal communities which were historically ostracized from mainstream have hardly attained any development. Jharkhand and Odisha which together constitutes to one of the largest deposits of natural resources in India have unfortunately deprived its tribal people from access. Contrarily, the State has exploited the natural resources by all possible means. This has resulted in an imbalance which gave birth to mass resentment at various point of time. The militant outfit dominated by tribal people called Naxal is one of its birth-child. It has constantly remained in a state of war with the State of India and has resulted in huge bloodshed. Known as Naxalism in Red-Carpet, the militant outfit grew immensely due to rise in recruitments of tribal people. Majority of them are the victims of State policies. Of many, the resultant displacement of tribal population from their original habitation has caused many to join Naxals. It has exacerbated due to rising State intervention for mining related activities. Industrial establishments under State patronage have grossly violated human rights of tribal people. They are subjected to displacement from their land in lieu of industrial setups. Tribals are least employed and those employed are also marginally paid under discriminated laws. Though State claims for transforming tribal livelihood to better standard of living but that remained in policies papers and not in reality on ground.
        Speaker: SHILPI DOODWAL (GOVERNMENT GIRLS COLLEGE)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 World solidarity with the indigenous peoples of Xinjiang, China: P 42.1

      Room 3.138

      During 2017 and 2018 the Chinese authorities launched an intensive campaign of forced cultural assimilation and mass detentions in Xinjiang, western China. The indigenous Uighur [Uyghur] and Kazakh peoples are the main targets. Their use of local languages, customs and symbols is widely restricted. This includes religious practice and different forms of social gatherings. The adoption of modern Chinese ways of living and acting is strongly encouraged, sometimes coerced or even forced. The campaign includes mass relocations, as well as the internment of hundreds of thousands of people in punitive 're-education' camps, where they are subjected to harsh indoctrination. Officially the campaign targets those with radical religious or separatist views; potential terrorists and subversive “two-faced” cadre. Yet, ordinary people have reportedly been interned for merely having relatives abroad or for being categorized as “unsafe” in the social credit score system – often due to simple infringements of the demands of the assimilation campaign. Hundreds of prominent indigenous cultural and religious figures, intellectuals and business people, most of whom were previously well integrated into the Chinese government and economic system, have also been interned in the camps. The battle for hearts and minds in Xinjiang has in the past two years taken on a new coercive and violent quality. In this panel, we welcome papers on the ongoing campaign of forced assimilation and on the detention camps; and especially also on worldwide solidarity with the targeted indigenous peoples and the Uighur and Kazakh refugee diaspora.
      Conveners: Dr. Magnus Fiskesjö (Cornell University), Dr. Rune Steenberg (University of Copenhagen)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.138
      • 11:00 The Fallacy of Disconnection. The Power and Vices of Managing Kinship in Xinjiang 20'
        Uyghurs around the world are starting to speak up more openly and more freely than they have before. This includes people who have been abroad but stayed silent for decades. Why? The situation in Xinjiang has become significantly worse since 2014 and been dramatically escalated in 2017. There is more to speak up about, but this is not the sole reason. Uyghurs in and outside China have before endured hardship with patience. Rather this paper argues that both the silence and the recent speaking up are closely connected to kinship. Up until 2017 most Uyghurs living abroad still had some, albeit often limited, contact to their relatives and were able to inquire about the health and well being of their parents and siblings. This motivated many to stay silent in fear of retaliation against their closest. But the incarceration policy commenced under Chen Quanguo in 2017 effectively cut this communication as the state threatened internmet for anyone interacting with people abroad, even if they were close relatives. In some cases, infrequent communications with parents could be upheld, but most lost contact entirely. Besides deep pain this has also led to a loss of hope and meaning. The meaning carried by a feeling of responsibility and duty towards the family. The feeling of connection, of "mutuality of being", even across continents. By cutting this connection the Party has removed the main incentive for Uyghurs to remain silent. Instead they increasingly speak out and tell their stories to a wider world audience.
        Speaker: Dr. Rune Steenberg (University of Copenhagen)
      • 11:20 The Uyghurs: Archives, societal amnesia and survival 20'
        Over the past two years, international media has reported more and more from Xinjiang, the area historically known as East Turkestan, of facilities reminiscent of concentration camps where over a million Uyghurs have been imprisoned without trial. Several well-known academics, poets, musicians, singers and artists have been arrested or have gone missing.
          In addition, China has embarked on a fierce assimilation policy in which Uyghurs and other minorities are expected to ""adapt"" and embrace Chinese customs. At present, all school lessons are in Chinese and the Uyghurs no longer have the opportunity to study their own language. Until recently there was a rich publication of books and newspapers in Uyghur and other minority languages. Nowadays, Uyghur publications have been completely replaced by Chinese-language books.
          Within the ongoing systematic assault on a whole culture and its people, appears the important question of what will be left of Uyghur cultural expression in the future. The presentation will discuss what can be done to preserve and care for historical Uyghur written sources and artefacts stored in museums and archives outside Xinjiang.
          As a framework, we will present perspectives proposed by UNESCO for protecting endangered cultures across the world. Swedish collections of Eastern Turki (Uyghur) material is world unique both in terms of its diverse content and of volume. Bearing in mind UNESCO’s definition, we would like to discuss within which parameters this material might be defined as the physical expression of international ‘world heritage’ despite being stored outside the Uyghur homeland.
        Speaker: Patrick Oscar Hällzon (Uppsala University)
      • 11:40 New organisations, hashtags and movements in the Uyghur diaspora since the mass internments of 2017-2019. 20'
        In the wake of the Chinese government campaign of internments of Uyghurs and other minority people in Xinjiang, starting in May 2017, the Uyghur diaspora has experienced a pronounced rise in activities and new organisations. This is in part due to the large number of people who fled or decided not to return to China after the introduction of 'strike hard' policies in 2014 and the increasing policing and militarisation after 2016. But the group of new activists also include moderates who have been living abroad for many years or even decades and who have previously avoided public political positioning. This talk provides an overview of some central organisations of the new solidarity movement developing within and beyond Uyghur diaspora communities. It seeks to explain the reasons for this rise in political activism in several factors including the loss of contact to relatives and the strong media attention given to the issue. Social media have central the the organisation of these movements and their rallying of solidarity, but also an Achilles heal due to poor data security and the questionable factuality of much of the information circulated here.
        Speaker: Halmurat Uyghur (Independent Scholar)
      • 12:00 Teaching methods in Xinjiang: Of primary schools, vocational training and re-education camps. 20'
        The paper presents core elements in political indoctrination in different educational institutions in XUAR. It focuses on the prevalent teaching methods in schools and training centres in the region in order to make sense of the reports and material leaked about teaching in the detention camps in Xinjiang and compares them to similar methods and strategies during the Cultural Revolution. The analysis draws parallels between political training for citizen in daily life, propaganda pictures drawn by farmers and school children and the techniques of political indoctrination practiced in the so called re-education camps and other detention facilities.
        Speaker: Nijat Hushur (Independent Scholar)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Discordant Solidarities: Exorcizing and Channelling Ghosts of Hegemonic Dominance: P 40.1

      Room 3.131

      On the eve of WWI, in The Life of Reason (1905), poet-philosopher, George Santayana declared that “Those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it”. With the smell of WWII still in the air, in Requiem for a Nun (19951), novelist William Faulkner made a character conclude that “The past is never dead. It’s not even past”. In a period of reawakening nationalism, both quotes often become part of injunctions to return to history as cultural heritage, in defiance of earlier, unsuccessful attempts to drive a stake through the hearts of colonialism, nationalism, racism and sexism. In the light of these perennial failures, “ghost” and “ghostly” increasingly serve as analytic constructs for undead, haunted spaces of identity commitment. Proliferating remembrances of diverse, complex, competing sufferings – for example, in racial, ethnic and gendered discriminations - valorize solidarities intended to dismember the hegemonic national. These attempts, however, often serve instead only to reproduce solidarities as discord that also bear the same and new inhumane potentialities. This panel invites papers to consider: 1) “ghost” and “ghostly” as referents for the discord embedded in making solidarities; 2) ethnographic accounts of the haunted places and undead beings that inform the present, motivating conflicts and/or shaping resolutions; and 3) ideologies that, like Succubus and Ghost Rider, can promote solidarity as discord and valorize the capacity to reproduce inhumane moral orders.
      Conveners: Dr. Brackette F Williams (University of Arizona/School of Anthropology), Dr. Marcelo Moura Mello (Federal University), Dr. Diane Austin-Broos (University of Sydney)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.131
      • 11:00 East Indians, Dutch spirits and territorial sovereignty in coastal Guyana. 20'
        The ethnographical material analysed in this paper explores political and territorial sovereignty through the lens of lived and embodied practices of co-habitation between East Indians and other-than-human powers. On the coast of Guyana, spirits of the Dutch, the first colonizers of the country, claim ownership over the land, especially on (former) sites of sugar plantations. In this paper, I focus not simply on living with nonhuman forces, but specifically, on the processes of how people learn to live with them. Through rituals, local Hindus seek to placate these spirits through the incorporation of the powers of Hindu deities in domestic spaces. These rites to Dutch spirits are defined by the traces and marks of the embodied and placed colonial past.
        Speaker: Dr. Marcelo Moura Mello (Federal University of Bahia, Brazil/ Visiting Scholar: University of Lisbon)
      • 11:20 To Inherit the Win?: Ethno-racial Identities in Making a Culture of Belong 20'
        Since 2017, Guyana, like some other ethno-racially diverse Caribbean countries, has had a Ministry of Social Cohesion, the stated vision of which is “A unified Guyana where diversities are embraced, conflicts resolved, networks and collaboration with stakeholders strengthened, equity promoted and decision making processes result in equal opportunities and benefits to all.” This presentation explores meanings of social cohesion in the Guyanese Ministry’s vision and mission statement, supported and endorsed activities, 2017-2019, to consider their implications for exocising the ghost of hegemonic dominance that has made writing histories of solidary identity group writing histories. In an era of resurgent nationalism, are visions social cohesion and respect for cultural diversity likely to expand or contract conditions for writing a Guyanese national or culture history? How might writing such history differ constructively from the previous production of competitive racio-ethnic histories; supplanting identity dynamics that of ghost-controlled history, which I have argued, operate as “a siren that simultaneously calls [the Guyanese], on the one hand, to construct and maintain distinctive group identities, while, on the other hand, encouraging them to engage a nation-building process through which [those] same identities dissolve into a homogenous national identity,” which then seems to belong to no one.
        Speaker: Dr. Brackette F. Williams (University of Arizona/SOA)
      • 11:40 Rendering Familiar Spaces Uncanny: Ainu Ghosts and the Haunting of Settler Japan 20'
        Indigenous Studies scholars have started to critique how research on either colonial oppression or subaltern resistance serves to either victimize or valorize disempowered communities. Given that the binary of oppression versus resistance becomes a catalyst dividing indigenous communities, this paper uses the concept of contemporaneous haunting to unsettle this problematic framework.
          This paper is based upon an ethnography of a Hokkaido University Ecotour that was organized by the indigenous Ainu for the majority settler Japanese. First, I establish that being indigenous indicates a specific form of haunting (Gordon 2008) created by the systematic elimination and continued erasure of the occupants of a land to sustain the production of a settler social world. However, the eliminated specters of the Ainu - past and present - arise in this Ecotour to unsettle the familiar spaces, social worlds and the bodies of people inhabiting these spaces. Furthermore, the uncanny in this Ecotour interrupts the narrative of oppression and resistance because it shifts the burden of haunting from the Ainu to the settler Japanese. 
          As a settler state, Japan requires the continued elimination of the Ainu to sustain the familiarity of occupied spaces, social worlds of the settlers and the legitimacy of the settler state. Simultaneously, they are continuously under threat from the eliminated ghosts that has the potential to render the familiar strange and uncomfortable. I argue that the haunting of settler social worlds unsettles the binary of oppression and resistance, and enables the Ecotour guides to focus on future potentialities and survival.
        Speaker: Dr. Roslynn Ang (NYU Shanghai)
      • 12:00 Ghosts of Return: U.S. Economic Nationalism’s Nostalgic Inventions and Erasures 20'
        Current U.S. administrative calls to protect “American workers” and “American jobs” invoke particular tropes of economic nationalism, each with their own ghosts, including the eighteenth-century revolution for U.S. independence from British colonial rule; labor union campaigns asking consumers to “buy American” in the twentieth century; and current anti-immigrant, anti-internationalist, and localist movements. The violent erasures of each, and their interconnections, are explored in this paper. Architects of U.S. economic nationalism performed their ideological position by appearing publicly in homespun linen clothing that was spun, woven, and sewn by people they held captive on their plantations, and wrote policies boycotting British colonial goods while secretly importing them for their own households’ use (not unlike Trump businesses’ purchasing practices), and calls two hundred years later to save American jobs by “buying American” invoked labor solidarity while supporting the suppression of African American and international workers’ rights (Frank 1999). The ghosts of all those denied economic independence and well-being in each past invocation of economic nationalism haunt the current disconnections of localist and economic nationalist arguments across the political spectrum in the U.S. from their own erasures. An invented economic nationalist U.S., in its ghostly flotilla of nations engaged in theatric self-extraction from a global economy, is haunted by a deeply embedded international system of production and its erasure of workers including imprisoned citizens of other nations in detention centers in what are also “American jobs.” Related examples placing the Brexit policy debates in historical context will also be discussed briefly.
        Speaker: Dr. Ann Kingsolver (University of Kentucky)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Between solidarities and unsolidarities: coping strategies, material adjustments and consensuses in post-welfare Europe: P 36.1

      Room 2.19

      The recent financial crisis introduced a series of neoliberal reconfigurations which took the form of a widely orchestrated policy paradigm change in Europe where the austerity politics provided a framework for the gradual separation of the states from their responsibility to ensure the well-being of their citizenry. Those developments have in many cases been answered by the people with resistance in the political level (massive demonstrations, new anti-austerity movements etc.) and novel forms of collectively and solidary-managed survival strategies. However, the fact that the waves of social unrest of 2010-2013 seem to have faded today, despite the intensification of the neoliberal adjustments, indicates that there might be another aspect in the contemporary sociopolitical scenery that often remains unexamined by the contemporary anthropological scholarship. This is the aspect of consensus. Therefore, this panel invites us to think, discuss and analyze novel forms of post-welfare capitalist hegemonies. In other words, what this panel asks is how the capitalist relations are reproduced smoothly in the context of the abandonment of the classic schemes of hegemony such as the welfare state. In an age that each one is interpelated as a microenterpreneur responsible for negotiating his/hers existence in individual terms, how does the deregulation of the market provide new tools to certain afflicted social strata to create market-based survival strategies and generate income, status or security, in collaboration with or at the expense of other afflicted groups in a national or transnational level?
      Conveners: Dr. Aliki Angelidou (Panteion University), Mr. Giorgos Poulimenakos (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.19
      • 11:00 “It’s my democratic right”: conflictual perceptions of democratic rights as moral legitimation of the use of immobile property in post-welfare Greece 20'
        Immobile property has historically consisted of the main axis around which the modern Greek democratic contract was materialized. Today, after eight consecutive years of austerity policies and neoliberal reconfigurations, the reconceptualization of property is again on the epicenter of conflictual discourses of what is the essence of democracy and democratic rights. The proliferation of platform capitalism, exemplified in the case of the mass spread of Airbnb in Athens, seems, on the one hand, to be functioning as a form of private welfare and investment for survival for the afflicted by the crisis petit-house owners with low or no income from wage labor and devoid of any welfare state politics . On the other hand, this process often leads to a wave of evictions of permanent working class residents which find themselves with no shelter in order for the houses to be rented to tourists. This paper will discuss how different social and class groups understand democracy and attach different meanings to what is the primary content of democratic rights. In other words, we will discuss how the crisis provide moral legitimation to conflictual discourses such as the “right to the use of property as desired” and the “right to shelter” in post-welfare Greece.
        Speaker: Giorgos Poulimenakos (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
      • 11:20 Notes on anthropological understandings of neoliberalism 20'
        In anthropological and more generally social theory, the term neoliberalism has become a buzz word. There has been a lot of research into the characteristics, forms and effects of as well as resistance to neoliberalism, with the neoliberalisation being treated as a set of hybrid processes, structures, institutions and context dependent practices and meanings. As a result, different theoretical approaches have been developed, putting forward a question of defining ‘neoliberalism’ and sometimes even expressing skepticism about the possibility of its conceptual definition.
          My aim here is to propose a critical examination of neoliberalism as an analytic category, firstly because its understanding is crucial in shaping any possible answers to a range of key questions (relations between the state and the social, neo/hegemony, consensus) that are discussed on this panel. Secondly, it is also important to note that, in postsocialist countries, it would not be adequate to see the process of neoliberalisation simply in terms of the withdrawal of the state, though neoliberal reconfigurations did lead to the reshaping of many institutions, norms and procedures of the welfare state, creating thus new social and institutional assemblages. This invites two questions: first, of identifying the types of social realities that can be labelled as „post-welfare Europe“, and second, of examining whether the label is universally adequate for describing all European societies, including the postsocialist ones. 
        Speaker: Dr. Zorica Ivanović (Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade)
      • 11:40 The marketisation of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Greece: coping with and responding to the Greek austerity measures 20'
        This paper will examine how heritage actors in Greece create a new, or in cases, recreate an Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) centred market as a survival strategy to generate income and status as well as the complex relationship between private initiatives and state strategies.
          The topic of this paper arises from the concerns of heritage practitioners in “commercialising” what is called ICH (such as dances, traditional agricultural techniques and products as well as traditional craft techniques). It based on fieldwork in Greece with heritage practitioners as well as civil servants of the Greek Ministry of Culture (MoC) who design the national cultural strategy for Greece and who state that ICH can offer “a way out of the Greek crisis”. This is translated into action by the Directorate of Modern Cultural Heritage (DMCH) of the MoC that promotes traditional techniques and their products under the label of ICH. Their aim is towards an increase in sales in the local industry, the creation of new jobs and the improvement of the image of Greece by demonstrating the “hard work of Greeks” and thus opposing negative stereotypes that Greeks are often associated with, including “laziness” and “backwardness” which have intensified ever since the first years of the Greek austerity. Simultaneously, local heritage actors and “cultural associations” invent or reinvent ways of finding economic benefit.
        Speaker: Dr. Panas Karampampas (École des hautes études en sciences sociales)
      • 12:00 Intended Measures, (Un)intended Consequences, Unavoidable Outcomes: Three Case Studies Addressing the Paradoxes of Neoliberal Reconfigurations in Contemporary Serbia 20'
        Following Geertz's dictum that we must address the splinters in a splintered world, in this paper I propose to analyse three differing, though subtly interconnected mini case studies. All three address, albeit in various ways, the issues of (un)solidarity, (failure of) consensus, material adjustments and survival strategies under partial and paradoxical neoliberal reconfigurations in contemporary Serbia. The first addresses paradoxes related to forms of access to state owned agrucultural land which were officially intended to support those who were most in need of cheap land, but which due to a complex interplay of state regulations and undercover machinations actually further the interests of the organisationally and financially capable “greedy.” The second treats the paradoxical outcomes of policy reforms dealing with issues of disability, whereby the doctrinary enforcement of the social model, coupled with a policy of inclusion that neglects social realities, and campaigns against supposedly incapacitating forms of institutional support which were seen as a legacy of socialism leave certain individuals with disabilities with less resources than they could get access to before the reforms. The third case puts forward issues of bureaucratic whimsicalities and corruption which block access to rural development funds to an experimental ecological tourism initiative set up by an urban couple who decided to “return to nature.” In all three cases, in order to cope with the (un)intended consequences of neoliberalising reforms, some of which were not fully or adequately implemented, the informants had to devise semi-legal or outright illegal evading strategies.
        Speaker: Dr. Slobodan Naumović (Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 WCAA Organizing Committee and WCAA meetings: 1

      Room 1.63

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.63
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Ethnographic Encounters with Reductionism and Essentialism [Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid]: P 41.1

      Room 3.129

      The study of different types of othering is one of the central themes in Anthropology that gained a new sense of urgency. Within the current global rise of populist politics, which systematically preys on essentialist and reductionist representations of the social world, our scholarship couldn’t be more relevant. Ethnographic methods are well suited to study and contest such dangerous narratives, as they both allow for a contextual understanding of the uses and meanings of essentialism and reductionism, while at the same time uncovering the diversity and plurality of human life that escapes any simplistic categorisations. In this panel we propose to explore different ethnographic cases, draw comparisons and construct theoretical framings, that advance our understanding of the role of essentialism and reductionism in people’s lives. We are interested in both politicised and quotidian narratives, actions and projects which are based on reductionist or essentialist assumptions about individuals or groups of people.
      Conveners: Dr. Jonatan Kurzwelly (University of the Free State), Dr. Marie Wallace (Arizona State University)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.129
      • 11:00 Sheep, goats and their blood: Discrepant uses and representations of ritual acts for essentialising and reinforcing difference in contemporary South Africa 15'
        2019 began in South Africa with a flurry of media reports describing, some in vivid graphic detail, the ritual slaughter of a sheep on a popular Cape Town beach by a group of #MustFall activists. Their action was in response to reports that a private security company, ostensibly working at the behest of nearby local commercial outlets and residents, had forced Black people off the beach. Focusing on various media responses to the two reported incidents, the paper shows how those responses reveal a deep-seated endurance, if not a revival and regrowth, of essentialism in the ways contemporary South Africans address persistently overlapping issues of racial and class differences that are made particularly salient through their being marked by everyday discrimination. The paper also considers a subsequent media call for the ritual slaughter of goats to ‘cleanse’ schools where racial discrimination against Black students is reported to persist. It uses the evidence to reveal a particular local manifestation of the global turn to a populist politics that uses ritual acts, and how they are interpreted, to reduce socio-cultural difference to essentialist images.
        Speaker: Dr. Andrew ' Mugsy' Spiegel (University of Cape Town)
      • 11:15 Making a Difference/Making of Difference: A Conjunctural Analysis of Development Discourse in São Tomé and Príncipe 15'
        Transnational discourses that operate at various scales are especially porous to essentialized notions of difference and the unequal moral geographies they naturalize. Using a conjunctural analysis of development discourse in and about São Tomé and Príncipe (STP), this paper aims to trace the relationship between sociocultural constructions of difference and socioeconomic structures of exclusion in the global development project. STP is an independent archipelago situated off the coast of Central West Africa. Originally uninhabited, African slaves were brought to the island beginning 1485 to work on booming sugar, coffee and cocoa plantations. Since independence in 1975, STP has relied almost exclusively on foreign aid. My paper explores how essentialist development discourse about the islands informs the positionality and collective identity of people living in STP, and how this process impacts the country’s engagement with global economic networks. Using ethnographic evidence from a rural fishing village and from local and foreign development organisations, I show how development discourse constructs STP as a place that is perpetually marginal, and assigns essentialist traits to the islands and their people. In response, Santomeans have re-imagined their society as one that is isolated and insular from global processes, even though they have historically always been incorporated into global networks of capital, labour, culture, and commodities. I argue that this process whereby Santomeans imagine and reproduce their own alterity has an under-appreciated impact on their action and potentiality. I ask how the construction of marginality serves a shifting global political, economic, and social order.
        Speaker: Nicola Sarah Soekoe (University of Witwatersrand)
      • 11:30 Ema Keithel: An Ethnographic study of women’s market in Manipur, Northeast India 15'
        Ema Keithel is one of the most historically important and unique market in the whole South Asia for being entirely operated and managed by womenfolk. It stands as a symbol of women empowerment in Manipur society. In the history of world, women’s of Manipur holds a high position, only in terms of domestic and social affair but also in political sphere, the women of Manipur stood firm in forefront of every movement and womenfolk gathered around the Khwairamband Keithel or Ema Keithel. In due course of time, large force labour migration creates a threat to the indigenous inhabitant’s economic network and the cultural integrity of the society. As a result, cultural assimilation among different ethnic groups creates a push and pulls phenomena. The market is one of the second largest markets in Asia. This unique feature of the market attracts lots of tourists and migrants in the city. But, the uniqueness of the market is still intact and firm among the women who are the sole sellers. The fear of losing their livelihood and threat from outsider and multinational company has started among the women (CORE, 2005). The present research attempts to find the real meaning of empowerment among these women. How these women in the market plays a vital role in the market affairs and the state as a whole in bringing solidarity among diverse ethnic groups. The present study used interview and focused group discussion among different categories of women present in the market for livelihood.
        Speaker: Nonibala Rajkumari (University of Delhi/ Department of Anthropology)
      • 11:45 The challenge of essentialism in Philosophy and Social Sciences 15'
        This paper consists of three parts. In the first part, I will analyse the essentialist positions in Philosophy and Social Sciences. The essentialist doctrine assumes that the referent units of abstract names share one or more characteristics. This tradition traces back to Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. In modernity, essentialism became the foundation of certain social movements and radical ideologies, such as nationalism. In the second part of the paper I will propose to consider a historical and ethnographic example, namely, the Polish messianic nationalism and its contemporary avatars. This example will serve as a foundation for arguments against both philosophical and political essentialism. In the third part of the paper I will present an alternative to essentialism, namely, the notion of Familienähnlichkeit or the family resemblance analysed in paragraphs 66-67 of Philosophische Untersuchungen. Finally, I will analyse the political consequences of accepting this Wittgensteinian alternative.
        Speaker: Prof. Witold Jacorzynski (Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropologia Social (CIESAS))
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Contextualizing Human Rights to Rights of Marginalized Categories of the World with Special emphasis on Women’s Rights [ Commission on Marginalization and Global Apartheid and International Women’s Anthropological Conference]: P 37.1

      Room 2.104

      Human Rights are viewed in international law and discourse as universally applicable to all humans, but paradoxically the definition of who is human varies in different contexts. Racism, Sexism, Xenophobia, and other social marginalization processes deny the very humanity of “others.” At crucial historical moments, many kinds of domination and violence have been justified thus. Under the most liberal political context of the Enlightenment, natives of colonized continents were denied even the most basic of rights because they were not considered as fully human. To this day children are torn from their parents, women are raped, people are starved and tortured, livelihoods torn away all because – it is said -- the victims are not human enough to be granted even the most basic human rights. Women’s human rights are regularly contested and denied, with women of socially marginal social groups suffering from the intersection of patriarchal and class or caste disadvantages. For the female half of humanity, however, the glass is still half full: no matter what, women are still struggling and in every context to assert their identity as fully human. As women gain some voice it is becoming more and more apparent that the most basic of human rights, the right of survival, for many comes at a psychological and physical price. In this panel we invite papers that deal with issues confronting people of socially marginal or low status categories based on “race,” ethnicity, sexuality, religion, gender or any other criterion.
      Conveners: Dr. RAGINI SAHAI (Amity University A unit of Rinand Baldev Education Foundation), Dr. SUZANNE HANCHETT (International Women Anthropology Conference (IWAC))
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 2.104
      • 11:00 Human rights and cultural rights: the fields of conflict in Latin America. 20'
        The concepts of multiculturalism and legal pluralism, in being very valuable assets, may in the context of their various interpretations serve as tools for resolving social conflicts, but conversely they can also generate them. The assumption is that multiculturalism and legal pluralism lead to harmonious coexistence of different societies within the same state. However, it is necessary to talk about difficult "critical issues", especially in context of women, children and other marginalized groups rights. Using examples from several Latin American countries this paper intends to: 1) present negligence on the part of the state as an institution which is responsible for the implementation of legal provisions that recognizes multiculturalism, including the use of traditional law of indigenous peoples, and that usually fails to comply with its obligations; 2) identify elements that are catalysts for generating processes in which the principles of multiculturalism may be incompatible with the concept of multiculturalism as promoted by UNESCO. A reflection on these processes and elements seems to be essential for intercultural dialogue, as well as for the debate on multiculturalism and legal pluralism that assumes communicational (consensual) rationality of the subjects.
        Speaker: Dr. Magdalena Krysińska-Kałużna (American Studies Center & CESLA Research Group on Latin America and the Caribbean, University of Warsaw)
      • 11:20 Looking for women's justice in the Circles of Women. A legal-anthropological approach. 20'
        The presentation's main objective is to introduce a feminine model of justice built on an empirical pilot research study of women’s empowerment groups: circles of women in Poland.
         
        CW also known as red tents or women’s hut of healing power, existed in different indigenous traditions. Women were getting together during a menstruation during full moon to go through changes in their bodies together. This idea inspired women around the world so CW become a grassroot activity to share their experiences, support and heal each other.
         
        A model of how women experience justice and power during the group process in the CW is utilized to build a theory of the feminine approach to the concept of justice framed by the legal - anthropological approach of living law. (Ehrlich 1922, Petrażycki, 1959).This is to frame the intuitive process of restoring justice on women's own rules.The concept of living law highlights bottom-up social processes as part of an intuitively recognized law (Petrazycki, 1957), a part of the current behaviour of people, which is dynamic and fluid, like a river capturing the freshness of social processes (Ehrlich, 1922).
         
        The main result of the presentation shows that CW as the empowering practice reformulates the classic understanding of justice giving them a feminine meaning. In particular, women by going through a process of healing, build their own sense of justice based on the restorative way of thinking where one meets the truth in the condition of receiving care and support by community members.
        Speaker: Dr. Lidia Małgorzata Rodak (University of Silesia)
      • 11:40 Projects, Programs, and Services for Marginalized Groups: The Case of Women in Bangladesh River Islands (Chars) 20'
        Suzanne Hanchett, IUAES 2019 - REVISED ABSTRACT 
          This talk reviews some women’s issues and human development needs in socially marginalized river island (char) populations of Bangladesh. Char people’s needs and concerns have low priority in  policy circles and government offices. Hundreds of NGO programs and three large donor-funded projects have tried to improve the livelihoods and reduce the vulnerability of these very poor populations. All of the donor projects have focused on women’s concerns. Evaluation studies have shown some positive results, but projects are always temporary. Providing health, education, and other essential public services to them in their island settlements is very very inconvenient because of the lack of infrastructure and hazards of water travel and regular flooding and land erosion; but without this step, little will improve for char dwellers. Women’s direct participation in future planning is essential.
        Speaker: Dr. SUZANNE HANCHETT (International Women's Anthropology Conference)
      • 12:00 Rural-to-Urban Migration as an Escape from “Harmful Traditional Practices”?: A Study of the Life Stories of Female Household Servants in Addis Ababa 20'
        Most of the young women and girls in Addis Ababa who work as household servants, construction workers or prostitutes are migrants from the Amhara region and other parts of North Ethiopia. They have fled from so-called harmful traditional practices, e.g. early marriage, abduction and rape. This article presents the life stories of young women and girls who have escaped to Addis Ababa, where they try to make a living as female household servants. Their struggle for survival in Ethiopia’s capital is documented, but also their will to take control of their own destiny. These life stories illustrate that their decision to leave their family and migrate to Addis Ababa is a subversive act against structural violence and the above mentioned practices. The discussion of these practices makes it clear that early marriage is a reaction of the Amhara region and other parts of North Ethiopia to economic pressures to which this society in turn responds in a cultural specific way. This interplay of economic and socio-cultural elements has triggered a dynamic with unprecedented consequences not only for the female part of the population but for the society as a whole.
        Speaker: Abinet Shiferaw (Wolkite University, Ethiopia)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Migrating and/as future-making [Commission on Migration]: P 31.1

      Room 3.4

      With a clear focus on the presence and the recent past, peoples’ futures and aspirations have been, until recently, neglected by studies in anthropology. However, as Appadurai stated rightly, humans are future-makers and future is a cultural fact. Appadurai’s call for anthropologists to investigate the future by describing people’s aspirations has received attention lately and brought forward a new debate on future anthropologies and the future in anthropology. A good case to understand people as future-makers is the study of migration. Migrating individuals embark on a journey with certain aspirations. These imaginings of their future are not merely abstract products of their consciousness, but are, according to D'Onofrio, embodied and embedded in their present actions. Our panel wants to pay attention to exactly these actions of future-making. Presentations may include: - Practices of saving/insuring - Imaginations and working towards the “good life” - Social mobility - Precarity and downwards mobility
      Conveners: Dr. Sophia Thubauville (Frobenius Institute), Ms. Vinicius Kauê Ferreira (École des Hautes Études de Sciences Sociales)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.4
      • 11:00 Aliens on conveyer belts. Aspirations of immigrants from Nepal in Poland 20'
        Research on immigrants indicate that the scale of the imigration from Nepal is growing (from 2017-2018 released on nearly 800 thousand work permits). In Poland immigrants from Nepal are quite new "guest workers". The migrants work mainly in construction and industry in positions that do not require qualification. They are coming in order to seek better life opportunities but they have to cope with new barriers they could not anticipate. They experience culture shock and many barriers stemming from stereotypes, bureaucracy and bad labour conditions. They try to adjust their hopes to new circumstances. The " conveyer belt" not only refers to the work in factories, common for Nepali people, but also in a metaphor of "being moved forward" (social and space mobility). In the paper we are going to report the data from our research (interviews, quantitative data) focusing on aspirations of the Nepali people, their definition of good life, projects of future in the context of nomadic and uncertain nowness and their endeavor to change “no(w)ness” to something better.
        Speaker: Dr. Joanna Bielecka-Prus (UMCS)
      • 11:20 Future-making of the displaced: Images and narratives of South Sudanese refugees in Uganda 20'
        This presentation will address future-making and aspirations of the displaced, taking some examples of South Sudanese refugees in Uganda. Refugees are often seen as beings deprived of agency, different from ""migrants"". However, wartime migration can be induced by aspirations for 'good life' as well as life-preserving endeavors. It is often overlooked that becoming and being a refugee is a transformative experience and practice. Migration can facilitate people to obtain new opportunities, reshape their future and become agents of change. This presentation reveals how South Sudanese youth make efforts to better their life and imagine their future, connecting narratives of their life-course, everyday practices and livelihoods for survival. Here, I take a war orphan as an example. He experienced the bereavement, repeated displacement and structual disadvantages as many other orphans did. In 2014, when he took a refuge in the small town close to the camp where he was raised, he decided to start a small-scale business to earn money, borrowing a small camera from his friend. He moved up and down in and around the camp to take portrait photos of people including refugees. The aspirations of refugees are projected on the photos. They prefer the utopian or even dreamy images to 'real' one by changing the background of photos. Such images are often reflected by the image of the third countries that refugees, including him, hope to get the chance to resettle in. I discuss how displaced people plan to shape their future in contingent conditions. 
        Speaker: Dr. Isao Murahashi (Kyoto University, Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies)
      • 11:40 Migrant Youth Envisioning Their Futures in Hong Kong 20'
        This paper explores the dynamics between migration and aspirations through the lens of teenage migrant students in Hong Kong as they adapt to education and life in a new home. The focus is on their educational trajectories, senses of belonging and identity negotiation. Data are drawn from ethnographic research of the first year upon arrival of two incoming teenage groups to Hong Kong – from mainland China and from South Asia (predominantly India, Pakistan, and Nepal). These two distinct cultural groups, with the Chinese group sharing cultural similarities with Hong Kong locals and the South Asian group being fundamentally different, provide insightful comparisons.
          
          This study finds that the future-making of Mainland Chinese students is based on an aspirational anticipation that they will achieve a middle-class lifestyle through a good education. This is a promise that points to the future – a hopeful future which they imagine Hong Kong education will promise. In contrast, the South Asians envision their future as being part of an imagined international Hong Kong consisting of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. This is an imagining that points to an idealized global metropolis. Building on Appadurai’s idea that aspiration is a cultural capacity – a navigational capacity that enables an individual to envision and explore the future, this paper discusses the factors that shape the aspirations of these migrant youth, and the way their aspirations in turn shape their present practices.
        Speaker: Dr. Wai-chi Chee (Hong Kong Baptist University)
      • 12:00 Future-making through informal savings associations in the Ethiopian diaspora 20'
        Being a worldwide phenomenon, also in Ethiopia informal savings and insurance associations constitute an important aspect of society. In parts of the country their membership amongst married adults is nearly 100 percent. They can be found in all classes of society, from shoe-shine boys to successful business men. The same informal saving and insurance associations are also popular and practiced in Ethiopian diaspora communities in countries that have diversified and comprehensive formal financial institutions. Practices of migration as well as saving are deeply entwined with personal and collective ideas about futures and a ‘good life’. The presentation will therefore focus on ideas of ‘good life’ and the future-making practices of the described associations and their members.
        Speaker: Dr. Sophia Thubauville (Frobenius Institute)
    • 11:00 - 12:45 Issues of Kinship Theory: Solidarity or Logic? [Commission on Theoretical Anthropology]: P 49.1

      Room 3.135

      The 14thcentury scholar, Abdul Rahman Ibn Khaldun, was the first to develop a theory of society and societal change based on the notion of ‘asabiyya, translated from the Arabic as ‘solidarity’. Ibn Khaldun’s theory is embedded in kinship – ‘asabiyya being the genealogical bond among relatives-- four centuries before Emile Durkheim bifurcated solidarity into mechanical and organic. As a construct, kinship has been a defining foundation in the development of anthropological theory. Ethnography continues to show the centrality of the kinship domain in people’s lives. The past decade has seen visceral debates across the four fields of anthropology regarding the position of kinship study in anthropology. Attempts have been made at synthesizing ethnographic, linguistic and population-genetic approaches to human kinship into a single theoretical paradigm. This session proposes to build on early conceptualizations and emergent issues, presenting a new theory or new cross-cultural data, or both. Analyses of data on kinship formed by non-procreative means raises the issue of what procreation really means. A new look at old debates leads to questions such as: Must there be an atom of kinship and what would be its content? To what extent, and how, does, the incest taboo become a fundamental and shared feature of the domain called kinship.? Kinship terminologies have a long and rich history of analysis. How can a focus on the study of kinship terminology today advance our understanding of kinship as a universal category of analysis and a pervasive human activity around the world?
      Conveners: Dr. Dwight Read (University of California), Dr. Vladimir Popov (University of St. Petersburg), Dr. Fadwa El Guindi (American University in Cairo)
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 3.135
      • 11:00 Social units, (the logic of) kinship terminology and (the work of) exchanges among the Gawigl people (Papua New Guinea) 20'
        This paper presents data on the Gawigl speaking people, living in the Western Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea. In particular, I look into the correlation between kinship terminology and the composition and maintenance of social units. The terminology of this complex system shows certain dissymmetries concerning affinal relationships which give important clues for understanding the kind of interconnectedness existing between the groups, their spatial and temporal development. Some insights that the analysis of the terminology provides will be put into the context of two prominent social activities, namely marriages and life-cycle exchanges. These will allow to see the specific spatial, generational and temporal features of the terminology ‘at work’. Special attention will be given to the shallow depth of the vocabulary, the ephemeral character of affinity and the development of the brother-sister relation over time.
        Speaker: Dr. Almut Schneider (Goethe University, Frankfurt (Main))
      • 11:20 Kinship in Sudanic Africa: Fiction of"tribe", "clan" and "tribal\clanic" solidarity 20'
        The concepts of ""tribe"" and ""clan"" have been widely used throughout Sudanic Africa or in reference to this region. Both “tribes” and “clans” have been seen as kinship-centered entities cemented by “tribal” or “clanic” solidarity among their members. Such perception of kinship does not, however, hold up at a closer look.
          
          Fiction of ""tribe"", ""clan"" and ""tribal\clanic"" solidarity is discussed in the paper within the context of Islamic and European legal and political terminology.
          
          Islamic terminology explicitly includes the term “tribe” (qabīla). The concept of “tribal” solidarity has been present in Sudanic Africa for several centuries. In the colonial period, the European authorities divided the local population in “tribes”, “clans” and even “sub-clans”. Most post-colonial African states then retained this terminology, supported by various foreign sources and scholars.
          
          The entities referred to as “tribes” or “clans” do exist, but in a rather vague, imprecise way. They may be defined as communities based on some real (“by blood”) or fictitious (“Yemenite”, etc.) kinship. Participation in such entities is connected to a kind of “tribal” or “clanic” solidarity between their members. This solidarity may become an element of unity, but not necessarily, mostly in the time of conflicts with neighbours or the authorities.
        Speaker: Dr. Nikolay Dobronravin (St.Petersburg State University)
      • 11:40 On the origins of Crow-Omaha terminologies 20'
        For the anthropologist interested in the evolution of kinship terminologies, the position of Crow-Omaha terminologies presents a somewhat knotty problem. Strengthened by Lévi-Strauss’s labelling of them as ‘semi-complex structures’, we have become used to seeing them as an intermediate stage between ‘elementary structures’ (linked with cross-cousin marriage; cf. Needham’s ‘prescriptive alliance’) and ‘complex structures (or systems)’ lacking cross-cousin marriage. In this view, Crow-Omaha terminologies are characterized not by prescriptions for but proscriptions of certain kin types, but still deal with marriage choices to some extent with reference to kin types identified and sometimes linked, especially vertically, by kin terms. However, detailed ethnographic studies providing proper evidence that Crow-Omaha terminologies may have evolved from elementary structures is patchy at best and speculative at worst. This paper draws together a number of such attempts and case studies in order to discuss their feasibility in a comparative manner.
        Speaker: Dr. Robert Parkin (University of Oxford)
      • 12:00 Eliciting Kinship Terminologies as Generative Idea Systems 20'
        Every community has multiple recognized types of social organization.Each type usually involves multiple actual organizations.Each organization is built up interactively by the use of a specific idea system: governmental organizations are built up by the use of governmental ideas, military organizations by the use of military ideas, economic organizations by the use of economic ideas, and so on. Each idea system has distinctive contents and a distinctive, coherent, logic. They are distinct social geometries. Kinship systems are built up by the use of kinship idea-systems. For brevity, we call kinship idea systems kinship maps.
          Kinship maps have been studied for over a century under the heading of “kinship terminologies.” This characterization involves assumptions that have distorted and obscured their true character, just as it would distort the true character of Euclidian geometry to call it a “geometrical nomenclature.”This paper describes a method for the field elicitation of kinship maps that both depends upon and confirms their logical structure as generative systems.It is an experimental method in the sense that every time it is applied, the application amounts to experimental test of a theory of kinship, and of social organization in general, as constructed from such idea systems and their instantiations. Every time the method works it serves as an experimental confirmation of the theory. So far, it has worked in every society where it has been applied.
        Speaker: Dr. Murray Leaf (University of Texas at Dallas)
      • 12:20 Kinship Logic and Ecological Property - a Comparative Look 20'
        The practical business of living with one’s kin and neighbours, and with people who are neither, changes with the economic basis of society – and this is reflected in changing descent and marriage rules, and in terminological systems. At the same time there are certain formal features of these rules and systems – their ‘logic’ if you like – which strongly persist through all or several of the environmental / economic stages. The purpose of this paper is to pick out and describe the most salient features of both kinds (including terminologies, rules and practices), as a background for the discussions in this session. It will be based primarily on Ethnographic Atlas data, but with some references to aspects which the Ethnographic Atlas does not cover.
        Speaker: Dr. Patrick Heady (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology)
    • 12:45 - 13:45 Lunch Break
    • 12:45 - 13:45 WAU Steering Committee: 1

      Room 1.63

      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.63
    • 13:15 - 14:15 Book Launch: 2
      Location: Library foyer
      • 13:15 Twilight Zone Anthropology: Voices from Poland 1h0' ( Library foyer )
        Edited by Michał Buchowski. Canyon
        Payon: Sean Kingston Publishing, 2019.
    • 13:45 - 15:00 Keynote Lecture 2
      Location: Morasko Kampus, room: 1.71; 1.43; 1.44
      • 13:45 Keynote Lecture 2 (Imagining World Solidarities for a Livable Future) 1h15'
        On the last pages of Upside Down: A Primer for the Looking-Glass World (2000), the Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano dares readers to exercise the right to dream. “Suppose we rave a bit?” he asks, and he offers a long list of possibilities for an alternative world. In this keynote address, I take up Galeano’s challenge to explore the possibilities of a livable future by means of world solidarities. I explore ways to work towards “universal liberation” (Roger Lancaster 2017), which is what the world needs now in order to move past the horrors wrought by radical evil (Richard Bernstein 1996; Hannah Arendt 1994). In imagining a livable future and forging world solidarities, I offer an anthropologically informed focus on the historical role of difference as ideological infection (Edward Said 1995) and as central to the anthropological endeavor, on tensions between identity and class politics and the fragmentations that result, and on the political economy of conflict that reproduces the impasses that make world solidarities seem so impossible. The current condition of the world, marked by war, ethnic conflict, nationalist fervor, environmental crisis and everyday structural violence, adds urgency to the multidimensional task to: understand the profound challenges facing humanity; transcend seemingly impossible impasses; and build productive connection and collaboration in the effort to sustain the earth and the living things in it.
        Speaker: Alisse Waterston (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York)
    • 15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break